aahunt03

in your opinion...

64 posts in this topic

There's a wealth of knowledge in this thread, thank you. I especially like the idea of practicing pertinent match skills. Analyzing my dryfire, i probably do too many draws and DA trigger pulls. And my best improvement comes when i call my shots in a match. I'm still working on honing that and doing it on every target though

Daniel K

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Also, leaning how to practice speed and accuracy independently of one another. That took a huge amount of frustration out of practice.

(Thanks, Steve Anderson!)

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Learn how to get a good sight picture and shoot bullseyes and then work on speed. Develop good sight picture, front sight focus on far targets and on close targets point and shoot as fast as you can.

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Taking Max's class was great, but only after I started practicing what he laid out for my training (live & dry fire) did i start to really see and feel a difference. Good luck.

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Read Brian's book

1. Learn to see everything faster

2. Dry fire practice

3. Video

4. Transitions and movement

5. Shoot more than you can afford--practice

6. Practice

7. Shoot as many matches as you can

Practice

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For me the biggest leap in skill I experienced was from taking a class. There are lots of people who can help you shave years off your learning curve. Find one you like, save up the money, and go.

Until then, you need to take a hard (and very honest) look at your own performance and figure out the one thing that's costing you the most time. For example, it won't do you much good to shave .2 off your draw if you can't call your shots, have to take three pokes at every popper, and get 5 Ds per stage.

Early on I was extremely fast but dropped tons of points. Eventually I figured out that my own problem was in stage programming (as opposed to planning). I would program the pace I imagined shooting, and I found myself shooting that pace regardless of what I saw. Now I program the acceptable sight picture for each shot I plan to fire. The speed ends up being the same in most cases, but now I know where all the bullets went.

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not pull the trigger unless the sights were where they needed to be and how they needed to be for that particular shot. the discipline to let that change and adapt and accept it, at speed and on the fly.

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Dry Fire every day...

Grip the gun hard...

Realize that speed will only come if you practice outside your comfort zone..

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The one thing I see in this entire thread is "commitment."  When we are committed to something we identify where we need to improve and seek out the resources to make that improvement.  At some point in my shooting career I decided I was committed and THAT'S the one thing I did to really improve.  (this may have been the point at which I decided to get a USPSA tattoo! HAHA!) 

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Buy Steve Anderson Books. Practice the dry fire and live fire drills regularly. Create a real practice schedule. Listen to his podcast for all sorts of tips and good info on how to improve your mental game.
Call your shots and shoot at your current level of skill on match day.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Just want it bad enough. You will figure it out. 

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On ‎8‎/‎18‎/‎2014 at 5:56 PM, aahunt03 said:

What is the single best thing you have done to improve your shooting abilities.

time behind the gun, live and dry fire practice.

 

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On 10/14/2016 at 1:59 PM, rowdyb said:

not pull the trigger unless the sights were where they needed to be and how they needed to be for that particular shot. the discipline to let that change and adapt and accept it, at speed and on the fly.

 

Sights every time, even on close burner targets. Dry fire practice watching the sights on transitions and the draw and etc....sights sights sights.

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