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in your opinion...


aahunt03
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Let me add that having friends to shoot who were working towards the same basic goals and having a few choice local mentors were huge benefits.

having friends to shoot

Disclaimer: don't shoot your friends :ph34r:

Fixed! I really need to look over my posts a bit closer before before submitting.

Edited by alma
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Video of myself, all the little mistakes are much easier to see and identify when you watch yourself vs your memory of your last run. Work on the lowest hanging fruit from a time wasting perspective and identify how you can do things sooner.

Oh and learning to actually watch my sight, that's been helpful as well

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  • 3 weeks later...

Commiting to the game. This meant regular dry fire, regular live fire, regular video review and study. Went from production C to master in a season and a half. Basically, you have to spend the time, money and effort on it.

Edited by lawboy
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  • 1 year later...

Dry fire.

Live range drills/practice.

LOTS of local matches.

And as many majors as you can get to.

All the equates to spend the time and be committed. Work on weaknesses and you WILL improve. It might not be as fast as you'd like, but year after year when you look back, you'll be able to see how far you've advanced.

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Developed the ability to diagnose my own problems and then design drills to work on them.

a corollary I think of learning to call your shots. Everything else starts to come together then, in live fire and dry fire. You can see what you are doing wrong and correct it.

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Developed the ability to diagnose my own problems and then design drills to work on them.

a corollary I think of learning to call your shots. Everything else starts to come together then, in live fire and dry fire. You can see what you are doing wrong and correct it.

Very cool, now you can learn to trust your eyes see what your sights did when things are happening at speed. Cool stuff to come still.

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First identify what you need to work on and focus on that. Most will continue to do what they are good at which really doesn't help at all.

Next break down that need into it's smallest components. Run drills that focus on those components. Spend real time on these drills.

I see a lot of people working on everything at the range. Pick 1 or 2 things and really get after it. Also don't spend more than 2 hours at a time without a break. When you get tired you get sloppy and sloppy teaches bad habits.

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Practice. Occasionally you want to double tap something, but aren't certain you posses the technique / skill set to accomplish the task. When you are on the range and there is no pressure, give it a try. In Sporting clays true pair targets there is (a perceived) obvious target order to shoot. IE Target A first then B. A group of bored shooters created a game called Xtreme Clayz. They force you to shoot 2 pairs AB then 2 pairs BA the final pair being the shooters choice. When out shooting with some buddies I would experiment and occasionally be surprised that the easy looking way was actually easier in reverse. good luck, practice practice practice. Oh yea, focus on the Front Sight!!!!!

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Just recently started training seriously after hip surgery and subsequent recovery time. So here is what I am doing.

Dry fire five times a week.

Work with a personal trainer 3 times a week on strength and agility.

Made a commitment to go to https://www.tacticalperformancecenter.com1-2 times a month (every handgun class they offer) for a year to train. Leaving for my fourth visit tomorrow and I can already tell the difference in my shooting both in accuracy and speed. Goal is to get classified as "C" in Limited (have only 2 matches under my belt so far), and make it to "B" class by the end of the year.

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forcing the discipline to see the sight picture/sight alignment i need for the A hit I want. (still very very much a work in current progress)

shoot with people better than me who can accurately and truthfully articulate the differences between us.

shoot with a person who has the same goals and me.

check my ego.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Being driven to excel had me seeking out knowledge way back then. It didn't take long to find 'beyond fundamentals', which led me to the internet and the pooling of resources and knowledge on this site.

There may be a few things I have learned for myself, but what has kept the fire burning brightly, are the daily updates, innovations, thoughts and techniques from the good people on the Enos forum

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Video by far. I am new to the competitive side of it and when I started having my daughter shoot vid of me I started noticing things that I didn't notice while shooting. Really helped cut time out of my days.

Looking over the sights after each shot, some kind of odd hip swing on the draw, and a couple of other dumb things.

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