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leave on case lube after reloading, or get if off somehow


davsco

One-Shot Case Lube - leave it on reloaded ammo on or get it off somehow?  

94 members have voted

  1. 1. so you sprayed your brass and loaded it. do you remove the one shot and if so, how? 2011 guns if it matters.

    • Leave it on
      49
    • Wipe it off (perhaps with a towel or rag when putting rounds into chamber checker)
      9
    • Tumble it off (but don't want media clogging hollow points). Don't want any detonations either!
      14
    • Some other method to remove the lube after loading
      4


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i generally try to wipe it off with a rag when i remove the rounds from the hopper and place them in the chamber checker.  but that doesn't get it all off and i've noticed a little buildup in the mags, but no issues.

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I use carbide dies, so no need to use lube. I occasionally use a little on my 9mm's to make it easier, and just leave it. I also use it for reloading 38-40 and 44-40 rifle rounds and just leave it.

Edited by Postal Bob
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i'm using new starline 38 super brass and it sticks a little on the powder nipple as well as the crimping die.  was hoping with new brass (and not depriming and sizing) i wouldn't need lube, but with it catching, powder is bouncing out of the cases.  spray lube in a bag and i did a couple hundred almost smooth as butter.  it really hasn't caused any problems but still i'd prefer it go away.

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Tumble in corn cob, 99.9999% chance of no detonation. I've put them in (jacketed bullets) and forgot about them for hours before...no issues.

 

There is an astronomically small chance of getting killed by a sloth falling off a building in New York...but it is never no chance.

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2 hours ago, davsco said:

i generally try to wipe it off with a rag when i remove the rounds from the hopper and place them in the chamber checker.  but that doesn't get it all off and i've noticed a little buildup in the mags, but no issues.


I make my own case lube with lanolin and HEET.

 

So this doesn’t necessarily answer your question, but I spritz or spray rubbing alcohol on an older (washed multiple times so it is lint free) terry cloth towel.  Then I put the reloaded rounds into the middle of it and do this:

 

 

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But I have tumbled lubed rounds in a regular vibratory tumbler with crushed walnut shells before.

 

No issues.

 

And with regular pistol rounds, no worries about an accidental detonation.

 

I can’t remember what the base is in One Shot.  But a splash of whatever that solvent is into the crushed walnut shells MIGHT help things along.  MIGHT….as long as it isn’t something hot that flashes off like lacquer thinner.

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I used to know a guy….

 

he would sprinkle teflon  powder into his casefeeder.

 

He said he noticed that it took less “uumph” to operate the handle on his 650.

 

of course, if you keep birds in the house as pets, having teflon powder floating around will probably kill them.

 

The advantage is you don’t have to tumble it off.

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I tumble after loading because I don't want a bunch of case lube and crud on my fingers when I load my magazines.  Fifteen minutes in the cement mixer with untreated corn cob and they look like factory ammo.  As for having a detonation during tumbling, that seems highly unlikely.  I've tumbled more than a half-million loaded rounds over the years and never had one detonate.  And even if one did go bang, so what?  Not like it's going to set off the whole lot.

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6 minutes ago, ltdmstr said:

I tumble after loading because I don't want a bunch of case lube and crud on my fingers when I load my magazines.  

Exactly. My fingers would be black after a day long match. Figured it was normal. Then started tumbling after loading and hands stay clean.

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To slick up the brass for reloading, I add a few small globs of paste wax with carnauba to the treated corn cob media and then tumble in a large Dillon tumbler before adding the brass.  I also use Dillon case lube and remove after reloading.  Works great with reduced effort for loading on my Dillon 550.  A little extra work, but then I do not shoot the volume many of those on this forum do.  

 

Michael

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On 11/28/2023 at 8:47 PM, GrumpyOne said:

They won't stick as much on the next loadings.

Exactly. New cases have no carbon fouling inside, which actually acts like a lubricant when resizing. That's why wet tumbling, which can strip out the carbon fouling inside the case, soetimes makes for harder resizing and reloading.

You can also try tumbling new brass in some old, dirty tumbling media. It will leave a slight dusting within the case, which will make for easier resizing and reloading. That's what I've always done with brand new brass.

Also, take out the powder nipple, and polish it with a dremel polishing wheel. That will also help the brass from sticking to it.

Edited by Postal Bob
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The easiest way I have found to remove One Shot is to spread out about 100 rounds on a medium size towel and spray it with a foaming glass cleaner. I use Sprayway but any will work. It can not have ammonia in it!

Roll the bullets in the towel to dry and then case gauge. This works with One Shot, I don't know about other lubes.

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I usually don't lube pistol brass brass but a few years ago I found some like Blazer Brass sticks in my resizing die to the extent it sometimes get a flair on the rim. So I dry tumble for a short time to get the big crap off then lube to resize/de-prime and then wet tumble it before I rollsize it.

I probably wouldn't have noticed that flair but I have several Barsto barrels on Sig's that don't have a chamfer inside the rear lug so these wouldn't chamber or would jamb. 

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On 11/29/2023 at 5:41 PM, Chills1994 said:

I used to know a guy….

 

he would sprinkle teflon  powder into his casefeeder.

 

He said he noticed that it took less “uumph” to operate the handle on his 650.

 

of course, if you keep birds in the house as pets, having teflon powder floating around will probably kill them.

 

The advantage is you don’t have to tumble it off.

Or clean up after the birds anymore

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