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Problems with Xtreme bullets


Waterfowl-widowmaker
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I recently ordered 500 each of 230 gr 45, 180 gr 40's and 124 gr 9mm to try. The 45's and 9mm turned out great. They had smaller SD's and better accuracy than the bullets I have been using.The 40's are a different story. I'm shooting them out of an STI Edge and all shots were off a bench @ 15 yards.

I weighed several of the bullets and they all weighed between 179.8 and 180.3 and all were .400 in diameter.

My first load was loaded with Solo 1K to 130pf at 1.180, once fired Federal brass with just enough crimp to remove the bell. SD was 93 with a 5 inch group. I thought that I may be over crimping them so I pulled a loaded bullet and there were no marks on it.

I've tried OAL's of 1.120, 1.155 and 1.135 with Solo 1K, Titegroup and Bullseye. Tried 130pf and 180 pf with all the different OAL's. SD's are between 90 and 105 and all groups were about 5 inches.

Went back to 180 gr Zero's and Bayou Bullets and everything went back to shooting a ragged hole with SD's between 8-12.

I'm at my wits end. Is it possible that the gun just doesn't like those bullets.

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It is possible the barrel does not like plating. Remember coated bullets are .401 and Zeros are copper. I would try my 40 loads with xtremes in a friend's gun.

A lot people use Xtreme 40s.

I was also wondering if the actual diameter of the bullet might be what is causing the issues. If they are perfect to size they they would be undersized compared to other coated bullets being used.

For example, my Blue Bullets in .45 are supposed to be .451 but on my calipers they measure between .452 and .453.

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Maybe you could try increasing your crimp. The tension on the bullet in the case may be different between each cartridge leading to the wide variation in velocities. The majority of the tension comes from resizing the brass. If the bell is not exactly uniform between each case and the bell is barely removed then the tension can be different between each round. I make sure to not only remove the bell, but to crimp the case mouth to the bullet. I find I can adjust my crimp die quite a bit from just removing the bell until it starts making marks in the plating or coating of lead bullets.

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  • 4 years later...

Micrometers DO vary a little.  I used to manage an ISO 9001 certified lab, and we had to calibrate all the measuring instruments in the entire facility.  It isn't uncommon at all to see a thousandth (or even two) variation between two micrometers of the same brand and model.  Even when they are NEW from the manufacturer!  The only way to know how accurate your micrometer is for certain is to check it with a precision gauge pin.  

 

On top of that, different users of the SAME micrometer can get different results, because of differing techniques, especially on compressible materials like soft lead.  That is why it can sometimes be meaningless to compare measurement from two different users using two different micrometers. 

 

I have found that bullets on the larger side of "nominal" for caliber to be more likely to shoot well for me, but that isn't a hard and fast rule either.  

 

In the end, it really matters very little what the diameter of your bullets are.  Either your pistol likes them and shoots them well, or it doesn't.  Feed it what it likes!  

 

Now, as for X-Treme plated bullets, I get pretty good results from the 147 gr. RN 9mm.  They measure 0.3555" to 0.3560" on my (calibrated) mic.  Their 230 gr. 45's work well for me too, but I haven't used any of their .40's.  Coated lead usually shoots as well or better for me though.  

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7 hours ago, redryder0023 said:

Ken, you think my micrometers are off? Both pair? The 9mm bullets I purchased measured .355 as advertised. Being a retired tool & die maker, I think I'm qualified to make an accurate measurement. The bullets measured .452.

 

Not necessarily, but it wouldn't shock me either.  I've seen some highly regarded manufacturers' micrometers with unacceptable tolerances, and straight out of the box.  We used NIST certified standards to calibrate them.  Micrometers with NIST certificates are available, but not without unacceptable cost.  Even then, one drop can throw them out of specs.  

 

I'd say your technique is probably spot on, but not everyone's is!  You may be surprised at the numbers someone else may get using your mic...!  

 

My main point is, it doesn't really matter WHAT diameter your bullets are.  (Within reason...) 

 

All that matters is whether your pistol shoots well with them.  

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O.K. guys ,I give. Starrett mic's are not to be trusted. Bullet dia. doesn't really matter. And put your faith in trial&error. I have to wonder if you approach your powder charges the same way?

Don't trust your powder scales.Powder charge weight doesn't really matter . All that matters is how your gun  shoots that load. I stand by my original post. I ordered .451 dia bullets from X-Treme Bullets and received bullets .452 in dia. I have contacted X-Treme Bullets about this matter, but they have yet to respond. I was merely trying to determine if anyone had a similar experience with this manufacture? I didn't mean to ruffle any feathers.

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You order cheap, you get cheap.

 

I shot a bunch of Armscor .452" jacketed bullets with every sign of satisfaction while they were on sale .

 

I once got some .450" coated bullets in the early days of that type product, they were dreadful. 

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  • 3 years later...

Reloading 10mm is not as forgiving as 45 ACP and 9 mm. I tested almost all powders until I settled for 13.5 to 14 gn of AA#9, 180 gn FP plates Xtreme and 180 HP bullets. I has good results using aa9. I believe it’s a powder things rather other fathers. 

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I generally give just a little more crimp, like .0005-.001 and have had better accuracy than just an even crimp. Years ago I bought two cases of Winchester 230 grain bullets, one FMJ and the other JHP. The FMJ’s miked barely .451 while the JHP were .4505-.450. I figured they were seconds so that’s why the good deal of $75. Per 1850. Anyway in my Rugers the accuracy is meh, but they shoot good out of my Springfields. If steamed up they will shoot fairly  well out of the Rugers. You may have to soup them up a little to fill the bore, just a thought. 

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