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Dry Fire without a Timer


Eli_a
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Most weeks i dry fire everyday even if sometimes it is just 10 to 20 minutes. Past few months I have been so focused on chasing par times that i used a timer in every dry fire session. Listening to some old podcasts someone mentioned putting the timer away for a bit and just focus on what you are trying to achieve. I put my timer away and honestly dry fire has been a lot more enjoyable. I can focus on the techniques and skills i want to improve on instead of just trying to beat the buzzer. This is probably not new to most shooters but i figured i would share since it has helped me out a lot. 

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Coming from a martial arts background, I treat dry fire without the timer as drilling individual skills. Generally this ends up being breaking down large items like full reloads into smaller drills aiming for 100% correct rather than par times. 

I treat training with a timer as the portion of my dry fire to push both to speed up over time but also find where the skills break down to drill again. 

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5 hours ago, motosapiens said:

perhaps it's an individual thing, but I started getting better quickly when I started using a timer less in dryfire. I still use it for a few drills to try to improve my natural sense of urgency, but 80% or so of my dryfire is without a timer.

Do you think it’s because you started fixing the issues instead of just going fast ?

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5 hours ago, rowdyb said:

You are likely to chase times and create pathways that are successful for the time versus actually doing the action correctly. 

Use the timer less and focus more on doing it right. As fast as you can do it right.

I think you’re spot on, and going back through my videos I can see a lot of those errors in matches 

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1 hour ago, Eli_a said:

Do you think it’s because you started fixing the issues instead of just going fast ?

i started being more honest with how much grip and vision I needed to make a shot, instead of cheating those things just to beat the par time. When using the timer all the time, I was doing some drills MUCH faster than i could ever hope to do them in live fire. Steve Anderson says that's not a bad thing, but I think it probably is. I think the more realistic my dryfire is, the better off I am.

 

It's still worth it to chase speed.... just not *all* the time for me. I think it can be pretty valuable in live fire tho, to push until the wheels fall off and figure out what you need to do better to faster and keep the wheels on.

 

I suspect that every person is a little bit different in their mental makeup. Part of getting gooder at shooting is figuring out what works for *you*.

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