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Nik Habicht

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Everything posted by Nik Habicht

  1. I like the Comp-tac beltfeed quite a bit, with Glock mags..... Never grabbed more than one, rare for me to start with second rather than first, when it happened the second load was done with first mag, without consciously thinking about it....
  2. I have multiple thoughts - and we probably agree more than we disagree: Troy is right -- the word "ruling" makes 10.5.3 the only correct response Kevin is right -- that to correctly evaluate the situation and issue the DQ under 10.5.3, one also needs to consult or be aware of the definition of "dropped gun" in Appendix A3 I'm less certain that this isn't well-known; that may be a geographic thing, or it's possible that it's less widely known in newer clubs than in more established ones. It is covered in the RO course, to the best of my recollection. I almost want there to be a follow-up question -- what other section of the rulebook needs to be consulted to fully evaluate the situation....
  3. Spinning this around for a second, and looking at it from the point of view of an arb panel: I can also see this as a question of discernment -- if I'm sitting on an arb panel, and you only cite the entirety of A3 as your reason for DQing a competitor, I may vote to overturn. Cite 10.5.3, and it becomes much easier to uphold a DQ. Easiest would be 10.5.3 and definition of "dropped gun" in Appendix A3. So, seen as a hierarchy 10.5.3 trumps A3. I'm interested in Troy's take....
  4. Kevin, Troy can probably provide the formal answer. I've always answered this question by citing 10.5.3 as that is really the info I need to rule. Appendix A3 defines a dropped gun for me, but it doesn't provide guidance of what to do about it -- i.e. that it's a match DQ. That's my best guess on why A3 was not acceptable.....
  5. Pretty sure that hits too close to home to be allowed here. Closed.
  6. I know a guy who shot his way to B and probably Expert with a 26, so I don't think you'd be giving up much with a 19, unless you have Gorilla hands -- then the reloads can be a little trickier than with a fullsize frame....
  7. Glock 34 with 10 rounders for matches; Glock 19 with 15 round mags for carry. Or go crazy and use the Glock 19 for everything.....
  8. Realistically, if you're to make a competitor hold or carry something and put it in a specific place, then the prop should activate or unlock something when correctly placed..... That way the item serves a purpose, and there's an incentive for putting it someplace....
  9. How loose/tight is the shell plate? Too much wobble? Generally speaking, when I've encountered similar issues in the past, and had the correct seating stem for the bullet profile installed, I found it helpful to run through the machine set-up procedures as outlined in the owner's manual. Occasionally I found that something on the list was loose, out of adjustment, etc. And while running through the complete list may not have been the most efficient fix, it always worked....
  10. Sort of -- and I hate to quibble. You've got 180 days to take the short exam. Once it falls off you have up until a year after expiration to contact DNROI and take the long version (50 questions) to have certification reinstated..... Once you're past the year though, it's most likely over, but I'd confirm with DNROI.....
  11. I acknowledged that it was a stretch -- but lets pretend that you're the RM: CRO calls you to a stage because a competitor wants to bag his gun at the end of a run in a Ziploc bag, and carry it that way to the next stage. Do you approve or not? Please use the rulebook as a basis for your decision...... There are calls that need to be made at most matches that are not explicitly and specifically addressed by the rulebook. My philosophy is to consider the impact of the situation on safety and/or competitive equity, and to consider what the rules say about similar situations. When it comes to safety concerns, the onus is on the match staff to make those decisions. I try not to make those arbitrarily and strive to come up with a ruling that addresses the problem at hand, while minimally affecting the competitor.
  12. Reach out to DNROI -- I suspect Mike's answer is what you'll hear, but at least you'll know definitively.....
  13. I'd guess that if you're a Master, win Nats in your division, and there are three GMs scoring 90% or better, you just might earn a G card that way..... I'd think making it on classifiers might be easier....
  14. If you're grabbing it out of your bag a few feet away from the safety area and then carrying it there by the handles -- I have no issues, unless you put your hand inside the bag on the way, or do something else unsafe...... If the safe table is large enough that you can drop your entire bag, to pull your gun out of and holster up, that works for me too.... For me its all context. I try to treat competitors the way I'd like to be treated, when officiating a match. When shooting one, I try to treat my fellow competitors and the match staff the way I'd lie to be treated.....
  15. It's a stretch, but there's a rule that gives the RM final authority over holster suitability. If there was really a dispute, and I was working as RM, I'd hang my hat on that rule to determine that a Zip-Loc bag was not legal, and that if a zippered compartment or bag was available, to request that it be zipped closed, when storing a handgun. In the alternative, I might rule that a competitor who did not have an appropriate bag, but did have an appropriate holster, be required to keep the gun holstered between runs.... That would set up a quandary at the end of the match -- but we could probably find a solution.... I'm ok with the stage bag, most likely, though I'd ask if there was a more secure alternative available. And I'd warn a competitor using that bag, that a hand inside the bag, would trigger a DQ under handling the firearm.... (Trigger accessible, right?) So bottom line -- try to make the best decision you can given circumstances. Try hard not to be a dick to the competitor, while at the same time considering and ensuring the safety of all others on the range -- it's a tricky balance but most of our ROs pull that off every day..... And for competitors -- try to think about it from the other side. I think there's an obligation on each of us to make sure that our equipment is as safe as we can make it.
  16. BTW - on the road to improvement it's not time vs. points -- rather the goal should be maximum points in the shortest time possible..... Need to focus on both, not treat them as separate things....
  17. The part I emphasized is the biggest bunch of nonsense I hear on a regular basis. I joined this forum before I'd ever shot a USPSA match -- and still managed to weigh in. It's not just about knowledge, it's also about experience, mental attitude toward shooting, problem solving, home repair, ability to tell a joke or look up a rule, or to say a kind word to a member who's hurting. This forum is about much more than shooting -- or the classifieds. Find your zone, open your mouth, and you'll be contributing....
  18. There's guidance in the classifier course book..... In some ways I think IDPA has the right idea -- where the classifier is usually its own stand-alone thing, not part of a monthly match.... There'd be less gaming - maybe....
  19. Oddly enough, while a nice fringe benefit, that's not what the forum was created for......
  20. There's always a simple solution -- limit capacity to whatever a 141.25 can hold in .40, and keep major/minor where they are...... Want to shoot a 9mm at major -- go for it. If it chronos above 165, you're good to go. You may find it a tad unpleasant, and you may find that it's a handicap still, but hey......
  21. Classifiers should not be gamed -- according to the classifier course book. So, eye-level ought to mean that hands are at roughly the same elevation as the competitors eyes. And I wouldn't start a competitor with feet on fault lines on a classifier.....
  22. Go post in the thread that discusses in the context of Limited. Closing this one down.....
  23. So we should ignore our customer base when making rule changes for divisions. OK, sure....... And tell me -- what do you hope to achieve by the elimination of Major? Can you map out the benefit to USPSA, to its members, to future potential members?
  24. Like I said Burkett came close -- and I don't think anyone's ever made a serious effort since..... The rest of it matters very much -- because the Nats is one match a year, with stages that are tightened down to the point where options aren't always readily available. Then there are far more members competing in Limited at Area, Sectional, State and local matches each year. Kinda arrogant to think that all everyone of them cares about is winning the division.
  25. Could it be indicative of anything else? Can you allow for the possibility that not breaking the top 60 at Nats simply indicates that the top 60 shooters in the division looked at the rules for that division, and then chose appropriate gear? Yep -- if the goal is to win Limited at Nats, you ought to bring a .40 and shoot major. About 10-15 years ago, Matt Burkett hit fifth place, I think, while shooting a 9mm. I wondered at the time whether or not Sevigny could pull it off, but he was smart enough to bring a .40 every time he tried. Currently, if Stoeger decided to do it on a lark -- that's a match I'd like to watch. On the other hand, if you're working your way up, and you cross over from Production or 3Gun, or something else, you can do ok with a 9mm shooting minor, against others in your class, once you learn a couple of things: 1. Shoot mostly Alphas fairly quickly -- if you're in C or B this alone will set you apart. If you're dropping a lot of Cs and some Ds, this is why you didn't do well in Production. Fix that. The only targets where you should be giving up points are movers and head box only targets. 2. Develop your own stage plan -- one that caters to your strengths. Don't blindly attack the stage the exact same way as everyone else; if you're playing follow the pack, the pack must be shooting the stage in a way that's optimized for your skill level, or there's only one way to shoot the stage -- rare. 3. Plan your reloads -- the extra capacity in the 9mm may allow you to skip a reload on some stages (Anything 20-22 rounds in length for sure) or to throw your reload earlier or later than the rest of the pack -- in a place where you have the most opportune window to get it done on the move. Most in B & C can't execute these on the level they need; I'd argue that even a number of A class shooters will struggle with 2 out of 3.
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