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Solscud007

Twins loading from a sidesaddle.

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That was WAY smoother than I expected to see when I read the title. Interesting idea for those who run side saddles either in competitions or just on a tactical shotgun. Seems like it requires a bit more dexterity than "normal" twins loading from a belt. Would take some practice Im sure.

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It does require a little more practice, but not as much as you might think. After about two weeks after I came up with it I was beating a 4.5 second par time (not every time, but on the flawless runs). It won't beat a quad load from a twins rig, but it's the best I can do from a side saddle

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Excellent job at taking a competition technique and adapting it to a defensive use. I'm impressed.

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Look great, indeed. Though I wonder how good that side saddle will hold the shells on recoil. Especially facing down...

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I have an old 500 with a saddle somewhere in my safe. I'll have to try this

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Look great, indeed. Though I wonder how good that side saddle will hold the shells on recoil. Especially facing down...

Through over a thousand rounds of buckshot and slugs I've literally never had a round fall out.

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Through over a thousand rounds of buckshot and slugs I've literally never had a round fall out.

That may depend on specific side saddle, as I am regularly observing an exact opposite of your experience.

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Through over a thousand rounds of buckshot and slugs I've literally never had a round fall out.

That may depend on specific side saddle, as I am regularly observing an exact opposite of your experience.
Oh I agree it'll be 100% dependent on what side saddle is used.

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Not bad actually.

I thought he was going to have a straight up twin loading system mounted on his shotgun, which I have seen already a couple times.

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Not bad actually.

I thought he was going to have a straight up twin loading system mounted on his shotgun, which I have seen already a couple times.

We have seen several of those. A few SWAT officers are using them.

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That's pretty impressive. Although fine motor skills and dexterity under pressure/time constraints is exactly why I've moved on from old school weak hand loading...

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I have a side saddle I bought from Wilson combat with the plastic clips. Mine doesn't seem to have as much clearance as the one in the video. What brand are you using?

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I have a side saddle I bought from Wilson combat with the plastic clips. Mine doesn't seem to have as much clearance as the one in the video. What brand are you using?

Prototype of the Aridus Industries (my company) Q-DC

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please dont take this as a criticism, I think its awesome technique and great thinking outside of the box, but the only strong hand loading in a tactical situation that Ill be doing is loading my hand with a pistol.

and I feel stupid actually saying "tactical", but you guys who matter know what i mean.

Edited by mike cyrwus

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I don't take it as a criticism (and I too hate the word tactical). But if you are loading, you can't be shooting, do what difference does it make which hand is doing it (assuming the strong hand load isn't slower.) If it is the same speed or faster, what's the difference? (There's no hostility in there, I'm genuinely curious to hear your take)

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strong hand on the gun gives you the ability to fire, assuming at least one still in the chamber. if the chamber is empty and you need to return fire, a pistol transition is the faster way to "reload".

I know this is totally the wrong forum for this, so I think we shouldnt let this side bar get too far.

When a shotgun reload can or should be performed vs a transition is very much up for discussion, always has been and prob always will.

Thats why cops stick to weak hand feeding of pumps for the most part.

Training is everything and I know that with sufficient training anything can be rendered moot.

Spyder, if you want to delve into some of the nuances of the soon-to-be-lost art of defensive shotgunning, grab John Farnams defensive long gun book, and maybe one of suarez'.

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Very Cool demonstration ; I've never had much trust using a side saddle with the rounds pointing up. They seem to start slipping down during recoil. Pointing down they hag up on the brass. The Dummy rounds your using do not look weighted, but Thank You for your video, and thinking out side the box. Again Very Impressive to watch :o

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Very Cool demonstration ; I've never had much trust using a side saddle with the rounds pointing up. They seem to start slipping down during recoil. Pointing down they hag up on the brass. The Dummy rounds your using do not look weighted, but Thank You for your video, and thinking out side the box. Again Very Impressive to watch :o

Adam has been testing his Remington with over 1,000 rounds of just buckshot. No idea how much bird shot he has fired. Not once has he experienced shells walking from recoil.

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Very Cool demonstration ; I've never had much trust using a side saddle with the rounds pointing up. They seem to start slipping down during recoil. Pointing down they hag up on the brass. The Dummy rounds your using do not look weighted, but Thank You for your video, and thinking out side the box. Again Very Impressive to watch :o

Adam has been testing his Remington with over 1,000 rounds of just buckshot. No idea how much bird shot he has fired. Not once has he experienced shells walking from recoil.
This. To clarify, in alpha testing for the Remington Q-DC I've got over 550 rounds of birdshot/slugs, and over 750 for the Mossberg. For testing I don't even shoot birdshot anymore. In all those rounds there has never been a single round shift from recoil, let alone fall out (and I've been watching closely).

I understand concern about brass down.. I've been seeing it a lot in response to tactical twins. It seems clear that many other shell carriers will drop rounds brass down. The Q-DC has a totally different retention system. No rubber tubes or gaskets, no flexible plastic, no elastic. It uses stainless steel springs that give consistent and reliable retention regardless of temperature, recoil, dirt, sand, dust, snow, or any other variable I've encountered.

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