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Paul B

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About Paul B

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    Indiana
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    Paul B Nielander

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  1. Recently had the opportunity (unwanted) to sample the warranties of two manufacturers. While both were pretty good, one is just outstanding. First my Romeo 1 lost its zero on my X5 after less than 1000 rounds. Called Sig, sent the sight back and had a new sight within 7 working days. They paid the shipping both ways. Only bad part was finding a fedex hub to send the sight. Outstanding service. Then a few days later the laser on my S&W Bodyguard went out after less than 100 rounds and no amount of new batteries would bring it back. Called S&W and they sent me a free shipping label but had to return the whole gun rather than just the laser module (which comes out easy). This process took over 3 weeks but found out why when the gun came back with a new frame with a crimson trace laser rather than the original insight one. Overall, 3 weeks would be considered great service if Sig hadn't set the bar too high. Appears Sig is very eager to maintain a great reputation right now.
  2. I can only second how really good Dillon has been about their warranty. I have two of their machines, a 650 and a 450 (that's right an antique 450) between the two the reloaded round count is well over 500,000. The 650 has had 3 broken cranks and 1 broken frame (probably from a "U" die for 38 Super) along with many many small parts. The 450 also has had many small parts replaced and new primer system parts continually. If the 450 has a weak point it is the primer system. Dillon always sends me the new parts free and even asks me to go through the rest of the machine to be sure I do not need anything else - you just do not get service like that anywhere else.
  3. Wow, 15 -20? Personal opinion, but I have seen the trend to larger squad sizes and I really think it is a major factor in shooter burnout. More than the work, standing around for 6-8 hours for a little over 1 minute of shooting just became a major turnoff for me. Heck even bullseye which is like watching paint dry is more active. We have to lower squad sizes either by limiting sign ups or adding stages or both. 10 to 12 is max with 8 being best.
  4. I agree that we cannot ignore the reality of being able to see through a mesh wall and be prepared for breaking the shot as soon as the target is visible through a port or at the end of a wall but Jodi went one step further. Essentially she said that you could stick your gun through a port or around the wall, bend your arm and aim it through the wall taking a shot. This is the part I have trouble with not to mention the safety problem.
  5. Sorry, but with all due deference to Jodi, this is a wrong headed interpretation of the rules and a safety problem. 1. Rule 2.2.3.4 - "All such barriers are considered to represent a solid plane and are considered hard cover unless designated as soft cover..." Aiming through a solid plane should be difficult unless we consider walls to all be glass. An obviously intentional shot through a mesh barrier on steel should be grounds for a DQ. 2. One of the original reasons for mesh barriers was to prevent a down range straggler from being missed when a stage is started - so now we have to add vision barriers to stop downrange visibility!!!!! This just sounds like more dilution of the rules to me but so be it.
  6. Not sure if we really need to make all stages idiot proof. Remember the old saying if you make something idiot proof they will just invent a better idiot. The shooter is responsible if they break the 180, not the RO or the stage designer.
  7. I may be wrong, but I think certain mag gauges have been deemed to be the correct way to measure the mags. The problem is that the gauges can be inaccurate for certain mags. The rulebook always shows the measurement on the back wall of the mag from the base to the very back of the feed lips. unfortunately some of the gauges are angled at the top to conform with the angle of an ideal magazine. If your mag feed lips don't fit the angle of the gauge (are at a sharper upward angle) then it probably will not bottom in the gauge (the gauge width is assumed to be infinity). The rules allow for an alternative measurement with a ruler for different basepads but say nothing about the angle of the feed lips. I guess we have to have a gauge to look official but a ruler should be the preferred method in my opinion.
  8. Thanks to RadarTech for quoting an applicable rule. Contrary to those who always say there is a rule, there is no rule on how to word a WSB. At this point as when this thread started, the meaning of standing in the shooting box is still clear to me and backed up by other rules regarding fault lines and stance in the shooting box - pretty sure one foot 2 feet behind would not comply with 8.2.2. Any interpretation by a RM is nothing more than their opinion which would certainly hold for a match but subject to criticism later.
  9. Your opinion does not matter either. If I am your RO you are welcome to hike for the RM.
  10. Standing in box is pretty clear to me. I would have done the same as the OP. We should not need a lawyer to do our WSB's. The only way the shooter can have only one foot in the box is if he is doing a yoga pose with one foot in the air.
  11. Just when I thought I would try a match after 5 years off I overstress both shoulders lifting a ladder ---- AARRGG!
  12. For me loading 9mm on anything -- ugh.
  13. Remember the sear assist spring on a Colt Gold Cup. About the size of a small ant. If you did any work on Gold Cups you had to have at least 10 spares.
  14. Least favorite: Rule allowing RO warnings - "finger" or "muzzle" should be silence or "STOP". At best concentration is lost at worst it can cause an AD. Favorite rule: No limit on mag capacity in Open or Limited. Really makes some stages interesting deciding on mag changes or none at all sometimes.
  15. Since we are reminiscing, one of the most fun stages I ever shot was at a local match in Richmond, Indiana several (maybe more) years ago. The stage was set up as a jungle course on the "back 40" of the range. It was heavily wooded with a very rutted, winding road running through it. The shooter was in the back of a pickup truck on a seat bolted to the bed with plywood blinders on 3 sides leaving only the back open. It was at least 40 shots as I remember reloading at least 3 times mainly to be sure I could engage all the targets The course was a surprise and it really was because even shooters that had been through it could not remember where the targets were to tell those who followed. The pickup ran at a fixed speed of only 3-5 miles/hour in the ruts of the road and the course was about 200 yards long. The targets came into view at random intervals with one here and 3 there. You did not want to be caught low on ammo as a reload lost you an array. It took constant attention as some targets were partially obscured and you had to shoot as fast as you could. At the end I remember a big smile on my face and I do not even remember my score. I suppose there are a lot of current rules broken by this stage but I also suspect it could probably be modified to fit current rules. I doubt it would ever be as much fun.
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