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fmiller

being an idiot

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On ‎8‎/‎9‎/‎2017 at 7:17 PM, sfinney said:

Well, that was uncalled for.

or was it exactly what he needed to hear? too many "mommies special little angels" these days...tough love is often required

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This forum exists as an exchange of knowledge. Telling someone he needs to "be a man" is awfully easy over the internet. Not every one at a match is stone cold operator.

If you read the thread, not once did he complain for the DQs, only asked for help in mentally planning a stage to so he would make less mistakes. I think he got some sound advice.

Sometimes that experience comes with time, practice.... other times, some never do really get it and move on slower paced endeavors.   Either way, asking for help is not being less of a man - I'd say more so.  Each to his own.

 

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You are correct when you come to the firing line after your walk thru to make ready and your mind goes blank.  But first, make sure your plan is solid, you have your foot positions and stance down, and your round count and target positions before this happens.  Your feet and body should follow what your rehearsed time and time again.  There may be targets missed the first time or two, but this falls  back on stage walk-thru and preparation.  It will start to become natural the more you do it.  Also, read the stage description and round count before the walk-thru.  Where your mistake occurs is when you watch other shooters just before you and think, "Man, I think I'll do that too!"  Then you may end up chasing that shooter's time/ movements and you've just aborted all the preparation you have done by changing your plan up.  Most likely, you will totally screw up the stage.  Stick to YOUR plan once it's locked in, visualize each shooting position and the targets on each before you get to the firing line and everything should go pretty well.  As far as being DQ'ed, chalk it up as a learning lesson for things to practice and not do in the next match.  Be cognizant of your muzzle at all times and practice movement with a clear weapon before you get to the range with movement in all directions, to include the draw facing uprange.

Edited by xd1977

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On 8/20/2017 at 3:24 PM, sfinney said:

This forum exists as an exchange of knowledge. Telling someone he needs to "be a man" is awfully easy over the internet. Not every one at a match is stone cold operator.

If you read the thread, not once did he complain for the DQs, only asked for help in mentally planning a stage to so he would make less mistakes. I think he got some sound advice.

Sometimes that experience comes with time, practice.... other times, some never do really get it and move on slower paced endeavors.   Either way, asking for help is not being less of a man - I'd say more so.  Each to his own.

 

LOL read his name it and his signature screams troll from the mountain top. prob just a static shooter that hasnt even shot a match.

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On 8/9/2017 at 7:04 PM, benchmstr said:

have you considered the technique I refer to as "being a man"? it requires you to focus and get the job done instead of being violently shaking and nervous like a virgin on her wedding night....highly recommend you try it

 

Just now read this. 

What a low-life thing to say, but probably expected from someone named bench master. Always sitting on the bench. Never in the game.

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Everyone in this post seems to be spot on in one way or another, when you are first starting out, "slow is smooth, smooth is fast" is the mantra I was trained with, that goes back to my Navy AT/FP and VBSS team days. But that same mantra is still taught at most military shooting & CQB schools, so trust me, it works; as stated in other posts dry-firing is an awesome tool to make yourself a better shooter and competitor; when I was at the top of my game, and getting ready for the 2011 World Shoot in Greece, I dry-fired an hour a day minimum and I also incorporated visualization training, which really helped; Saul Kirsh does a good job on that subject in on of his books, and Dr. Jason Selk also covers it well in some of his works. You can check out the "Sharpening the Warriors Edge" by Bruce Siddle also; Hope this helps.

Edited by MQW

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