Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
speederlander

How much better are Titanium Cylinders when action tuning?

Recommended Posts

Just soliciting comments from those with experience about the degree to which the lighter titanium cylinders impact how much a revolver's action can be tuned/improved. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm on the titanium cylinder is more gooder band wagon.

 

Less rotational mass to turn

Less likely to peen at cylinder stops

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you pull the cylinder out of a 929 and a 627 5" PC, and weigh them......the 929 cylinder will weigh exactly 4 ounces less.

Back when we were shooting 6 shot major, the 5" 625 was the gun to have. But at the end of that era I shot a match, and the better shooters in my squad had 625's with 6"-6.5" Model 25 barrels and titanium cylinders. 

When we went to 8 shot major and got 627's with 5" barrels, those shooters got 627 Pro's, put on 6"-6.5" Model 27-28 barrels and titanium cylinders.

The 929 gives the shooter a great starting setup. Still a lot of shooters like the style of the 627 series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure either turns out a better trigger. I think it's a preference thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ignatz said:

 

The 929 gives the shooter a great starting setup. Still a lot of shooters like the style of the 627 series.

 

This is exactly where I’m at in my quest for an 8 banger. That and I’m leaning toward the 627 to keep my calibers the same so I’m just doing one revolver load.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well some did go with 6" barrels, I think Olhasso and Bagakis used them.  But Jerry never did nor did most others.  

The Titanium Cylinder was more popular and did seem useful.

Once the 929 came out it was popular at the last few serious nationals, but that could have been buzz?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ignatz said:

If you pull the cylinder out of a 929 and a 627 5" PC, and weigh them......the 929 cylinder will weigh exactly 4 ounces less.

Back when we were shooting 6 shot major, the 5" 625 was the gun to have. But at the end of that era I shot a match, and the better shooters in my squad had 625's with 6"-6.5" Model 25 barrels and titanium cylinders. 

When we went to 8 shot major and got 627's with 5" barrels, those shooters got 627 Pro's, put on 6"-6.5" Model 27-28 barrels and titanium cylinders.

The 929 gives the shooter a great starting setup. Still a lot of shooters like the style of the 627 series.

 

So the SS 8-shot is 4 ounces heavier than the titanium?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually prefer the feeling of a stainless cylinder in the trigger pull if you are shooting precise DA shots.  It feels better to me.  High speed stuff it makes little difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 4 to 6 lb double action pull is still the 4 to 6 lb with a steel or titanium cylinder. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, speederlander said:

 

So the SS 8-shot is 4 ounces heavier than the titanium?

Yes, the 929 cylinder.  Remember the 929 cylinder is slightly shorter than the standard .357" size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the bigger deal is the fact that the cylinder notches peen less with titanium cylinders. Wish I had one for the 625.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can get a great trigger with the Ti cylinders, but my experience with my 627-5 38/357 has been  3 cylinders that flame flame cut, especially when you get split cases, they also have what look like erosion where the bullet initially pushes out of the case.  I've since went back to the steel cylinder.  On my 4" and 6" 625, I've no issues with both Ti cylinders, the cylinders look the same as when I installed them.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never drank the Ti kool-aid.  I agree it will pretty much prevent the notch peening thing, but that problem is caused mostly by abusive handling, and can be fixed fairly easily. There is no other real advantage, and I have shot (and tuned) LOTS of both types.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×