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Revopop

Removing a stuck bullet from a revolver barrel?

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Revopop   

Had a squib load at the range today in my Model 14. I had one on my last range trip with a 1911, got the bullet out just fine, but with the revolver I can't figure out exactly how to hold the gun while I push the bullet out with the rod. For the 1911, I took it to a local gun shop and the guy did it for me, but he took the barrel out and stood it up on a bench in order to keep it still while pushing out the bullet.

Can you help a brother out?

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chirpy   

First, do a search for this problem......

Grab a shooting buddy....Have him hold the grip and barrel muzzle end up, cyl. open. A glove to protect his hand from the front sight would be a good thing. I have used a hardwood dowel (different sizes available at Loew's or Home Depot) and a small hammer. Most of the time the bullet will come out buy hitting the end of the dowel. Sometimes more persuasion is needed but a bigger hammer is not necessarily the answer here. I have read where some people soak the bore in various solvents overnight and or use rods of different material but at the range this wasn't possible. I have never seen a case where the bullet didn't come out but I am sure others have. Others will, I'm sure, offer other fixes.

Richard

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Brownells sells brass rods for different bore sizes. Theses won't harm the bore and won't splinter when driving a stubborn one out.

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HSMITH   

Be careful with wood dowels, if they do break they can be harder to get out than the stuck bullet you were after to begin with. Soft brass rod is the best choice.

If you don't have a helper or lead jaws for your vice pull the cylinder out of the gun, hold it by the barrel and pound it out.

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Carmoney   

Just hammer on the rod and the bullet will dislodge. If you don't have access to a hammer (such as when you're at a match or something) or a brick or big rock, stick the rod down the barrel and then smack it against a fixed object (bench, tree, etc.). They're usually not in that deep or stuck that tight. Do the very best you can not to damage the barrel crown.

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If you have some oil handy use it to lubricate the bore in the direction the bullet's traveling. It'll be hard to start (no lube under the bullet) but once it gets to the lubed part it'll slide a lot easier. Multiple bullets in the barrel, now that's a different story...

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Bubber   

Glockopop, All very good advise. Hopefully the cylinder can be opened and cleared of the rest of the ammo. I have seen lodged bullets in a revo before, even read stories about them .... I of course never had one <_< ... well maybe a couple.... :unsure: Whatever rod you use it should be flat where the rod meets the bullet so as not to expand the bullet anymore. By myself I have simple held the revo by the barrel and struck the rod with whatever was handy, sometimes a brick building. If the cylinder is locked you still can use a rod to drive the bullet back into the case, It is a little scary but should not be, I just hate doing it .

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I carry an old cleaning rod with a 22lr casing stuck on the end. Slide it down the barrel, whack it a few times and there it is. Cost me ZERO DOLLARS. Everyone has old cleaning rods or sections of rods laying around.

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Friend of mine was shooting PPC, the 18 shots in 45 seconds stage, I think, when he stuck one. He grabbed his clearing rod out of his box, punched out the bullet, reloaded, and finished the stage in time. His rod has a broad head for whacking with the bare hand, and a swaged wadcutter doesn't jam in too tight, but that was a real performance.

Had a squib load at the range today in my Model 14. I had one on my last range trip with a 1911

But the O.P. has worse problems than picking a clearing rod.

You need to closely study and improve your reloading procedures, Glockopop.

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I keep a one pound lead ingot in my range bag. It fits nicely in the hand and is just right to pound on the rod and drive the bullet out when nothing suitable is a handy.

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Carmoney   
I keep a one pound lead ingot in my range bag.

That way if you're shooting PPC and you stick one in the barrel, you can build a fire, pull the bullet while you're waiting for the lead ingot to melt, cast a 148-grainer, let it cool off enough to reload the round with a Lee Loader, and still finish the stage!

Edited by Carmoney

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alellis   

If it is tightly stuck and you have to use a hammer, support the cylinder else you could damage the yoke screw.

al

Edited by alellis

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RogerT   

For the record.

Multiple bullets stuck in barrel (has happened...) are best removed by drilling and tapping and then drawn out FORWARD through the lubricated barrel.

NOT a range DIY-job.

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dajarrel   

I watched a shooter friend of mine stack six in a revolver barrel one night. Couldn't get them out and the revolver had to be rebarreled. I always wondered how the barrel didn't burst.

FWIW

dj

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I watched a shooter friend of mine stack six in a revolver barrel one night. Couldn't get them out and the revolver had to be rebarreled. I always wondered how the barrel didn't burst.

FWIW

dj

I dont think i would be using his reloads. :surprise:

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Revopop   

Well, I got the bullet out last night with some Rem Oil, a cleaning rod, and a meat tenderizer. I seem to have misplaced my hammer. :rolleyes:

But the O.P. has worse problems than picking a clearing rod.

You need to closely study and improve your reloading procedures, Glockopop.

Good point, but the two loads that squibbed were completely different, loaded in completely different ways. The one in my 1911 was a .45 with Clays loaded on a Dillon SDB, the one in the revolver was a .38 loaded on a Rockchucker. Before I seated the bullets, I looked in all the cases with a flashlight, but I was mostly looking for double charges. The load I was using was a mere 3 grains of Clays, so I'm not terribly surprised I didn't notice that one was light. I shot the rest of the .38 loads I had with me, and none of the rest of them were light. The stuck one almost made it out the 6" barrel, so I figured I'd burn through the rest of them with my 640.

I think it was probably just a run of bad luck, hopefully it's over. Thanks for all the help, guys!

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Toolguy   
Had a squib load at the range today in my Model 14. I had one on my last range trip with a 1911, got the bullet out just fine, but with the revolver I can't figure out exactly how to hold the gun while I push the bullet out with the rod. For the 1911, I took it to a local gun shop and the guy did it for me, but he took the barrel out and stood it up on a bench in order to keep it still while pushing out the bullet.

Can you help a brother out?

I made a tool out of 5/16 dia. x 8 in. long brass rod and 3/4 dia. x 4 in. long brass rod. Drilled a 5/16 hole 1/2 inch deep 2 in. from one

end of the 3/4 rod and pressed the 5/16 rod in the hole. Keep in range bag. This tool will knock out a stuck bullet in seconds, slide

hammer style, and never damage the hand or the bore. This one has a groove and number every inch on the 5/16 part to show

where the end is in different length barrels. It is cheap enough to make and one will last forever.

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I've been there. Once even cleared a stage with the timer running and two squibs! Very informal match. Wooden dowels are a cheap fix, but they splinter under the pressure.

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Revopop   
Do we have a new nominee for "Captain" of Team Bunny Fart?

I'll settle for "honorary co-captain" :blink:

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I thought all good IPSC shooters carried squib rods. If you don't you need to because if you shoot long enough you will. My son ruined a schuman 40 barrel with a squib. The problem being he was using precision black bullets and the primer drove the bullet in the barrel just far enough to let a live round chamber. When fired it split the 40 barrel right down the top.

You need to use at least 5/16 brass rod and cut it about 2 inches longer than the barrel. Brass rod can be picked up at any steel yard or machine shop and is well worth any money you have to spend on it.

Larry

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Carmoney   
I thought all good IPSC shooters carried squib rods.

You must be referring to those who are better IPSC shooters than handloaders, right? :)

Edited by Carmoney

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