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noylj

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Everything posted by noylj

  1. Why use hard alloy for .45 Auto? To me, 11-13 BHN is hard and more than hard enough for .45. If worried about leading, get coated bullets. I have never gotten bad bullets from a commercial source, though I have had a couple that were undersized for my gun (and, yes, HARD lead does do a lot more leading then "soft" if fit isn't there), but even the really ugly National Bullet Co. bullets shot very accurately out to 25 yds. All you need with lead bullets and handguns is to have the base completely filled out without any wrinkles at the base.
  2. Well, they did say it had flash suppressors in the formulation. Most won't discuss competitor's products.
  3. Since seating is only based on contact between the seater stem and the bullet and the case head to the shell plate, where would case length come into the equation—assuming seating and crimp are separate.. Next, for almost any pistol shooting, normal COL variance of +/- 0.010" makes no difference to POI out to 50 yds and you'll never notice any pressure variance..
  4. Lee and Hornady size down the furthest of common sizing dies, and Hornady and Redding size easier than other common sizing dies. I run mostly Lee on my 1050s, with some Hornady New Dimension. If dies don't chamber after sizing, Bulge Busting takes care of the problem.
  5. It simply isn't an issue other than the aesthetics of not having kernels on your arm. The gun doesn't care and accuracy is unaffected, so why sweat it? You can increase the charge to reduce the unburned kernels even more. Ask at an indoor range how much "unburned" powder they have to sweep up every day. I would rather not worry about a non-issue then to clean my gun between runs as I would then need 2-20 fouling shots to get it back to known accuracy.
  6. TG and pressure spikes: That is my "opinion" as I have shot many TG loads and at low starting loads, with rounds that have all been weighed to +/- 0.05gn, I will get maybe 1 or 2 out of 10 rounds that have significantly different recoil impulse and more flattened primer than the other 8-9 rounds. I also get this occasionally with N310 and Clays. This doesn't happen every time, but enough to make me wary. NEVER with any other powder. I also always check bullet tension after seating the bullet and before "crimping," so I don't think that I have bullet set-back and, if I did, it wouldn't only show up with these three powders so consistently.
  7. Never used the Dillon powder check. I already had the Lock-Out die before I ever got a 1050. Very sensitive—it fails charges that are in cases with a slightly different case capacity. I use it "loose" on the press and, when I get a Lock-Out, note if it is by very much, adjust just a little and then inspect the charge in the case and weigh it. After several years, I have not found a charge out by more than 0.2gn, but I STILL use the die and still look in the case.
  8. TG produces pressure spikes at low loadings. TG also does not handle even minor over-loads very well. TG is a fine powder, if it works for you. Personally, I would get a standard Lee sizing die. Standard Lee and Hornady sizing dies go down almost as far as any sizing die can. Dillon is very sloppy and the rest fall in between. If your round feeds and chambers, ignore the bulge. If it goes all around the case to the same extent, then it is a result of the undersized sizing die and an expander plug that doesn't go down far enough. If it is only on one side of the case, it is the result of seating the bullet crooked (where a better expander plug, more case mouth flare, and a better fitting seating stem might be good investments). Always, always inspect the powder charge in the case before placing a bullet on top. Use your eye or an RCBS Lock-Out die, no matter the cartridge or powder being used.
  9. Any fan or ventilation is the room? The cover is to let you get a good reading without the effects of air moving over the pan. Use the shield at all times, including setting zero and calibration.
  10. Plunk test: The solution to chambering problems is to determine the cause: Take the barrel out of the gun. Drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth a few times. Remove and inspect the round: 1) Scratches in the ink on bullet--COL is too long 2) Scratches in the ink on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp 3) Scratches in the ink just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case 4) Scratches in the ink on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit 5) Scratches in the ink on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster. Usually, if the round hangs up on the feed ramp, it is due to the COL being too long—but your round looks like a short COL. In your case, with gun empty, pull slide back and check if barrel is lifting up from the frame/feed ramp due to compensator. Before loading ANY bulley, first create two inert dummy rounds so you can slower reduce COL until the rounds fit the magazine, feed and chamber without issue. Too many folks seem to think there is just ONE COL that covers all bullets and this is NOT so. Just a few minutes testing will almost always establish a COL that will work with any particular gun.
  11. I run my 9x19 and 9x21 cases through the Lee 9mm MAK FCD as a bulge buster. First, get a Lee or Hornady sizing die--they go down the case much further than other brands, particularly Dillon. This is the only reason I can imagine an undersized sizing die could be of any use with case bulges not being removed during sizing. Next, you should learn to do a "Plunk" test so you KNOW where the problem is. Plunk Testing: The solution to chambering problems is to determine the cause: Take the barrel out of the gun. Drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth a few times. Remove and inspect the round: 1) Scratches in the ink on bullet--COL is too long 2) Scratches in the ink on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp 3) Scratches in the ink just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case 4) Scratches in the ink on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit 5) Scratches in the ink on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster.
  12. I find the 1050 perfect as it comes. If I am going to stop loading, I turn off the case feeder. I may pull the case tube if I am in a hurry to stop. For load development, I only feed 10 cases into the case feeder. If I am mass producing, I simply turn off the case feeder finish up. (I really HATE the way this site sets a URL for certain phrases (like case feeder), and then moves the cursor in FRONT of the phrase, since my typing then starts to overwrite what I have typed) The very best thing to do is to get the DVD and watch everything the technician does. He does things without thinking that make the job easier. Very good thing to watch carefully. I don't check powder weight, I run an RCBS Lock-Out die to check the powder. VERY sensitive. So far, after several years, there have been no charge rejects, but the die detects powder height changes due to differences in brand of case. I keep the Lock-Out die sort of loose, so when it lock up, I can make a ver small change and get it to unlock. I then check the weight anyway and it has always been within 0.1gn of target. Just as a point of contention, I find my Lee Pro Auto-Disks and Hornady powder measures to be a bit more consistent than the Dillon, which will throw the rare 0.2gn charge from target.
  13. I have only found the rare case that has walls too thin and FC has not been one of them, ever.Almost all are foreign and one was RP. I don't need an undersized die, I need to eliminate that one in 1000 or even rarer case that I pick up at the range with absurdly thin walls. I think I might throw out one or two cases every couple of years. No big deal. If you are finding a lot of FC cases that can't hold the bullet, then a good sizing die is the answer (where you might complain to the die manufacturer)--where a u-die with minimal chamfer on the carbide would be a decent choice as you KNOW it will be sized better than the sizing die you have. Almost all my sizing dies are Lee or Hornady. These two brands size a bit lower than the others and work very well. The Hornady sizes a bit easier, but it also costs more and, with my 1050s, I really don't notice the sizing effort. Alternatively, if you shoot JACKETED bullets, you can simply lightly chamfer the case mouth inside and out, as you should do for every case ONCE, and seat the bullet with just a little case mouth flare, if any. For this, I find a Hornady seating die works great, as it has a sleeve that helps to keep the bullet aligned to some extent. Don't try with lead or plated.
  14. Primers look fine. Primers also aren't that good an indicator of pressure. Measure the expansion ring about ⅜" above the case head (this bulge is with all fired rounds and not due to unsupported chamber). Carefully mic around the case and you'll get a good measure of the expansion ring, and you can track it as you work up a load. Fire a few factory rounds so you know what the "max" expansion ring is. Also, better to note felt recoil and where the cases land vs factory rounds.
  15. 1) As stated, too much crimp will loosen the bullet. Just remove the case mouth flare (~0.358" at the case mouth) 2) Some cases have walls that are simply too thin. Rather than order an undersize sizer, I simply toss them. 3) Do a push test on the seated bullet and then again on the crimped round. 4) I love MG bullets, but they priced themselves out of my reach, when I can get PD and Zero for less. 5) I love 0.357" jacketed bullets in all my 9mm guns. 6) If you still have the other bullets that you were successful with, try them with your current set-up just to see if the set-up is still as good for them. I simply can't imagine MG being an issue and the others not. 7) Always do a finger/thumb push test on all 9mm rounds, as the 9mm as a wide range of case walls from various manufacturers. Should do it on all rounds, but 9mm seems to be very worst in terms of case variation.
  16. Per reading about factory ammo, they get several million rounds through the carbide before replacing.
  17. I'm probably off a mile, but what I see is not enough crimp--looks like some shine at the case mouth and some residual case mouth flare in the photo, but that could just be from lighting for the photo.
  18. Plunk Testing: The solution to chambering problems is to determine the cause: Take the barrel out of the gun. Drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth a few times. Remove and inspect the round: 1) Scratches in the ink on bullet--COL is too long 2) Scratches in the ink on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp 3) Scratches in the ink just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case 4) Scratches in the ink on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit 5) Scratches in the ink on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster.
  19. you can find the same variation when you switch powder lots. ANY change in powder should be addressed by dropping the charge some and working back up.
  20. noylj

    PCC

    A fast powder will not produce the same velocity as a slower powder. Next, A slower powder will produce more gas and give higher velocities in longer barrels. Odds are your using TiteGroup or other FAST powder and CCI is using a normal slower powder.
  21. Also, if using large primers, make sure you are not using a small primer swage rod.
  22. Powder would NOT produce the exact same scratches on two different metering bars. Looks like tool marks, so I would inspect the base plate it slides along and sand it smooth or contact Dillon.
  23. One Shot CASE LUBE or dry lubricant and degreaser? Should NEVER use any oil or grease on powder measure.
  24. And, as MikieM said: "You realize, of course, if you measure the case mouth of a factory loaded round you'll have the solution to this dilemma" or, just use the factory round to set the crimp and not bother measuring anything. Just do a "plunk" test. Factory ammo seems to only have enough "crimp" to keep taper of case straight and the case mouth does not contact the bullet hard enough to leave a mark. Years ago I played with crimp and found that it did not make a statistically significant or repeatable difference in accuracy.
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