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stage planning: minimizing time spent on shooting a field course


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here is my algorithm, please critique:

 

1. build a mental map of all targets and their positions

2. identify "mandatory" shooting positions (these are positions where targets are only available from, you have to go there)

3. plan the rest of targets: minimize the time to shoot the rest of the targets between mandatory positions, by:

 

a) minimize the number of shooting positions (shoot as many targets from one position as possible)

b) avoid movement without shooting or reloading

c) avoid very wide transitions

d) avoid very hard shots, pay extra attention to steel, no shoots etc.

e) avoid moving backwards as much as possible

 

4. then figure out the rest: reloads (easier for high cap), DQ traps, where to shoot on the move, feet positions etc.

5. memorize, visualize, air gun

 

Of course, this is way too complicated and takes a long time, so I typically default to doing only 1, 2 and reload positions when I dont have much time to study the stage.

 

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One thing you’re missing (but probably doing anyway) is to review the written stage briefing for the start position and number of targets. Then, before you do anything else, make sure you’ve actually found all the targets. If the stage is confusing as far as which targets are which, with stuff available from multiple positions, etc (a “memory stage”), it can help to step outside of the shooting area to figure out the targets, then go back to the regular planning process. To me, finding all the targets is the most important thing because the biggest (non-DQ) penalty that a single mistake can cost you is 2 mikes and a failure to shoot at. 

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4 hours ago, DKorn said:

One thing you’re missing (but probably doing anyway) is to review the written stage briefing for the start position and number of targets. Then, before you do anything else, make sure you’ve actually found all the targets. If the stage is confusing as far as which targets are which, with stuff available from multiple positions, etc (a “memory stage”), it can help to step outside of the shooting area to figure out the targets, then go back to the regular planning process. To me, finding all the targets is the most important thing because the biggest (non-DQ) penalty that a single mistake can cost you is 2 mikes and a failure to shoot at. 

yes, my #1 rule already assumes I did that

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4 hours ago, Tango said:

yes, my #1 rule already assumes I did that


I figured as much, just wanted to emphasize for others who might skip that step. 
 

The biggest key for me is to stop walking the stage over and over again after you have a solid plan. Once you have a plan that’s good enough, stop trying to improve it, memorize it, and start visualizing it. A decent plan well executed will usually best a great plan poorly visualized and executed. 

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Content is great; format seems overly complicated. 

 

When doing my walk throughs, particularly on a really big squad, I prioritize critical positions. If the start position is simple, there's no need to practice standing with hands relaxed. I'll spend more time walking tough/technical/critical positions. 

 

What I did was create doctrine; this helped me simplify my stage prep. There's no need to make decisions when they're already made. My default doctrine is:

 

1. Engage and move left to right. 

2. Draw to easiest target

3. When in doubt, engage targets from as close as possible. 

4. Fight for alphas. 

 

Those are not absolutes, but definitely makes my stage prep easier, especially with huge squads. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 7/1/2020 at 11:53 PM, Tango said:

a) minimize the number of shooting positions (shoot as many targets from one position as possible)

b) avoid movement without shooting or reloading

c) avoid very wide transitions

d) avoid very hard shots, pay extra attention to steel, no shoots etc.

e) avoid moving backwards as much as possible

 

 

 

I would consider changing "A" to shooting into and out of positions.  Even though you stated in "B" to avoid movement without shooting or reloading the thought of shooting as many targets from one position can get you standing still too long without getting the body ready to explode to the next shooting position.  Does that make sense?

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  • 4 months later...
On 7/3/2020 at 9:39 PM, konkapot said:

Content is great; format seems overly complicated. 

 

When doing my walk throughs, particularly on a really big squad, I prioritize critical positions. If the start position is simple, there's no need to practice standing with hands relaxed. I'll spend more time walking tough/technical/critical positions. 

 

What I did was create doctrine; this helped me simplify my stage prep. There's no need to make decisions when they're already made. My default doctrine is:

 

1. Engage and move left to right. 

2. Draw to easiest target

3. When in doubt, engage targets from as close as possible. 

4. Fight for alphas. 

 

Those are not absolutes, but definitely makes my stage prep easier, especially with huge squads. 

Agree!  Good stuff.
Thanks

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  • 1 month later...
6 hours ago, TWHaz said:

If possible squad yourself with the top shooters at the match. Watch ask and learn. You will advance. 
unless you are a GM already. 😁

not true, if your a GM shooting with other good shooters will help keep you advancing, there is something to learn from almost everyone.

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On 1/29/2021 at 3:10 PM, MikeBurgess said:

not true, if your a GM shooting with other good shooters will help keep you advancing, there is something to learn from almost everyone.

I don't think it is necessarily class that makes the difference as much as experience does. Shooting with people that have a lot of match experience, even if they are a lower class than you, often helps because they (should) be good at stage planning. And since everyone looks at a given stage a little differently, they might see something you don't. 

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22 hours ago, Gooldylocks said:

I don't think it is necessarily class that makes the difference as much as experience does. Shooting with people that have a lot of match experience, even if they are a lower class than you, often helps because they (should) be good at stage planning. And since everyone looks at a given stage a little differently, they might see something you don't. 

As my dad used to say, everyone on earth knows something you don't. I've learned alot from discussing stage plans with complete noobs just because they are different people from me and sometimes pick up on things I miss. It's very easy to get into a rut of doing what you're comfortable doing instead of looking at different ways (even ones that seem dumb at first) and analyzing them.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/2/2020 at 5:53 AM, Tango said:

here is my algorithm, please critique:

 

1. build a mental map of all targets and their positions

2. identify "mandatory" shooting positions (these are positions where targets are only available from, you have to go there)

3. plan the rest of targets: minimize the time to shoot the rest of the targets between mandatory positions, by:

 

a) minimize the number of shooting positions (shoot as many targets from one position as possible)

b) avoid movement without shooting or reloading

c) avoid very wide transitions

d) avoid very hard shots, pay extra attention to steel, no shoots etc.

e) avoid moving backwards as much as possible

 

4. then figure out the rest: reloads (easier for high cap), DQ traps, where to shoot on the move, feet positions etc.

5. memorize, visualize, air gun

 

Of course, this is way too complicated and takes a long time, so I typically default to doing only 1, 2 and reload positions when I dont have much time to study the stage.

 

 

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