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JohnS23

9mm Load 124/147gr Titegroup

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Hello,

 

Just wanted to ask if some of you can share your load data? Primarily for competition.

 

Thanks!

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You might want to check the Search button …..   :) 

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This topic has been covered to death in this forum, but some very common loads with TG are 3.2 grains under a 147 or 4 grains under a 124. These are for coated bullets, which you didn't specify what you were using. Also, like any reloading question, it will vary with your specific gun/environment/OAL that you can get away with

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Been running 3.0 gr at 1.145. For the 147 gr. Way over power factor at 138.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

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17 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

You might want to check the Search button …..   :) 

Sorry about that, I’m new to the forum, there’s a lot I don’t understand in other topics! Haha.

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17 minutes ago, ajblack said:

This topic has been covered to death in this forum, but some very common loads with TG are 3.2 grains under a 147 or 4 grains under a 124. These are for coated bullets, which you didn't specify what you were using. Also, like any reloading question, it will vary with your specific gun/environment/OAL that you can get away with

I’m going to be using coated RN bullets. So far the data I’ve got from their website was for a different type of bullet, and a much shorter one I believe. 

 

Thanks for the info!

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12 minutes ago, 223to45 said:

Been running 3.0 gr at 1.145. For the 147 gr. Way over power factor at 138.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

Thank you! Will give this a try.

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Theres a lot of good info on this forum, but you sound like you're new to reloading so make sure to start on the low end and work your way up. Overall length and gun make/model will affect your results with the same bullet and powder combo. Especially with a fast powder like TG there's not much room between safe ammo and overpressure ammo.

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52 minutes ago, ajblack said:

 sounds like you're new to reloading so make sure to start on the low end and work your way up. Overall length and gun make/model will affect your results 

 

Be sure to run The Plunk Test to determine the longest you can seat

those bullets in Your Gun     :) 

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You'll encounter different ogives in different bullets makes, particularly in coated bullets.  This will have a say in your OAL, which in turn can have a say in powder charge required.  The OAL for one 124 gr bullet might not be the same as another.  You'll have to determine all this based on your bullet and your chamber.  Do the plunk test.  For instance, the newer style Acme 124 gr RN bullets have a narrower ogive than the 125 gr RN Blue Bullet and can be loaded to a longer OAL than the Blues.

 

For better information why don't you post the actual bullet you plan to load and in what pistol?  I bet there's a multitude of load data for your specific requirements.

 

To answer your original question, in general for coated bullets I use 3.1 gr Titegroup for 147 gr bullets and 3.7 gr Titegroup for 124/125 gr bullets but I use a much shorter OAL for the 124/125 gr bullets.

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3 hours ago, BJB said:

You'll encounter different ogives in different bullets makes, particularly in coated bullets.  This will have a say in your OAL, which in turn can have a say in powder charge required.  The OAL for one 124 gr bullet might not be the same as another.  You'll have to determine all this based on your bullet and your chamber.  Do the plunk test.  For instance, the newer style Acme 124 gr RN bullets have a narrower ogive than the 125 gr RN Blue Bullet and can be loaded to a longer OAL than the Blues.

 

For better information why don't you post the actual bullet you plan to load and in what pistol?  I bet there's a multitude of load data for your specific requirements.

 

To answer your original question, in general for coated bullets I use 3.1 gr Titegroup for 147 gr bullets and 3.7 gr Titegroup for 124/125 gr bullets but I use a much shorter OAL for the 124/125 gr bullets.

I plan on buying coated RN bullets from Missouri Bullets and Gallant Bullets.

 

I’m going for 124 gr and 147 gr to test which one is best for me. I currently have a Glock 19 and a Springfield 1911 Range Officer in 9mm.

 

I was thinking of using Alliant Sport Pistol, since the load data for their types of bullets are posted on their website. However several competitors in my area suggested the Titegroup instead. Having said that, I wanted to try both powders, but I do not have data on Titegroup yet. 

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Sport Pistol will be more accurate and cleaner.

 

3.8 titegroup and a coated 124

3.2 titegroup and a coated 147

 

Load as long as your guns chambers will accomodate.

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3.2 tg 1.145    147 grain.     125 grain 3.7 1.15 ovl

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5 hours ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

Be sure to run The Plunk Test to determine the longest you can seat

those bullets in Your Gun     :) 

Do this so you can get an idea how long you load your bullets in your barrel.  Then you can start experimenting.  What I do is get the ideal length and put the bullets in pill bottles labeled 9mm, 40, 124's, 147's & etc.  I'm older so I have a lot of pill bottles.

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7 hours ago, JohnS23 said:

I plan on buying coated RN bullets from Missouri Bullets and Gallant Bullets.

 

I’m going for 124 gr and 147 gr  

 

It's a great plan - testing 4 different bullets in your gun to see which is "best" for you     :cheers:

 

Be aware, that it's possible that you might need a different OAL for each bullet -

should really run FOUR Plunk Tests.     :) 

 

Don't run a Plunk Test with one of those, and set your OAL for all four bullets -

might not work.

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7 hours ago, JohnS23 said:

I plan on buying coated RN bullets from Missouri Bullets and Gallant Bullets.

 

I’m going for 124 gr and 147 gr to test which one is best for me. I currently have a Glock 19 and a Springfield 1911 Range Officer in 9mm.

 

I was thinking of using Alliant Sport Pistol, since the load data for their types of bullets are posted on their website. However several competitors in my area suggested the Titegroup instead. Having said that, I wanted to try both powders, but I do not have data on Titegroup yet. 

 

 

 

For Blue Bullets, the 3.1 for the 147 and 3.8 for the 124's is about right in my CZ. I recently loaded up a bunch of the Gallant 135 grain rds, used 3.3 of TG, but the really nice factor about the Gallants is I found they will seat in almost any brand of case, (yes, even the dreaded CBC and Aquila villains) at a decent OAL. I'll stay with the Blues for match ammo, but will stick with the Gallant for the sole reason I can load even the most obscure 9MM brass I have on hand. 

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46 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

It's a great plan - testing 4 different bullets in your gun to see which is "best" for you     :cheers:

 

Be aware, that it's possible that you might need a different OAL for each bullet -

should really run FOUR Plunk Tests.     :) 

 

Don't run a Plunk Test with one of those, and set your OAL for all four bullets -

might not work.

In doing the Plunk Test, should I be worried if I’ll need to seat the bullet deeper depending on the barrel? Or is the minimum OAL usually much shorter than the longest I can load in a glock barrel for example.  

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5 minutes ago, mont1120 said:

 

 

 

For Blue Bullets, the 3.1 for the 147 and 3.8 for the 124's is about right in my CZ. I recently loaded up a bunch of the Gallant 135 grain rds, used 3.3 of TG, but the really nice factor about the Gallants is I found they will seat in almost any brand of case, (yes, even the dreaded CBC and Aquila villains) at a decent OAL. I'll stay with the Blues for match ammo, but will stick with the Gallant for the sole reason I can load even the most obscure 9MM brass I have on hand. 

Is there a specific book/manual I can purchase to see load data for hodgdon powders? They seem to only have a few data in their website, compared to alliant for instance. 

 

I plan on getting a Cz as well, will take note of this. Thanks!

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7 minutes ago, JohnS23 said:

Is there a specific book/manual I can purchase to see load data for hodgdon powders? They seem to only have a few data in their website, compared to alliant for instance. 

 

I plan on getting a Cz as well, will take note of this. Thanks!

 

Other then what they have on the website, no.

 

You can try going to http://www.handloads.com/loaddata/default.asp and look up various charge there. I also recommend WSF for the 9MM. But, everyone has a favorite on here, and really, most of them are right on, it is just a matter of preference. I would stay with faster powders for 9MM since the lighter bullets work better with the faster burners.

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7 hours ago, oddjob said:

Do this so you can get an idea how long you load your bullets in your barrel.  Then you can start experimenting.  What I do is get the ideal length and put the bullets in pill bottles labeled 9mm, 40, 124's, 147's & etc.  I'm older so I have a lot of pill bottles.

This is a great idea. Thanks!

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8 hours ago, MemphisMechanic said:

Sport Pistol will be more accurate and cleaner.

 

3.8 titegroup and a coated 124

3.2 titegroup and a coated 147

 

Load as long as your guns chambers will accomodate.

I will be getting this powder as well. Good thing they post their load data on their website. Thanks!

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8 hours ago, JohnS23 said:

I plan on buying coated RN bullets from Missouri Bullets and Gallant Bullets.

 

I’m going for 124 gr and 147 gr to test which one is best for me. I currently have a Glock 19 and a Springfield 1911 Range Officer in 9mm.

 

I was thinking of using Alliant Sport Pistol, since the load data for their types of bullets are posted on their website. However several competitors in my area suggested the Titegroup instead. Having said that, I wanted to try both powders, but I do not have data on Titegroup yet. 

I don't load those specific bullets but I bet somebody who does chimes in soon. 

 

As stated, plunk test them all.  The OAL in one barrel might be too long in the other.  Plunk test, find your OAL, then shorten it a little more.  Also, when you chrono keep in mind that each firearm will produce a different power factor with the same load because the G19 has a 4" barrel and the Springfield has a 5".  You can produce different OAL loads for each barrel if you so desire but that isn't strictly necessary, and can actually get confusing with a lot of guns in the mix.  My short leade chambers dictate my OAL when loading 9mm, so for the longer leade chambers the OAL would seem much too short.  In reality I haven't see a change in accuracy at 25 yards with a very short OAL versus what would be considered the optimum OAL.  One thing to be aware of if you have to go to a very short OAL is spiking chamber pressures, so you might have to back off the powder just a smidgen.  The required OAL can vary considerably d/t the different bullet geometry, ogive, etc.  What will stay somewhat more consistent is the volume remaining under the bullet inside the case, the boiler room if you will.  When you start compressing this volume is when spiking can occur.  Titegroup can spike very fast.

 

Also, if you haven't loaded coated bullets before you'll find crimp can play a big factor in accuracy and/or leading.  Please use the search feature and investigate crimp for 9mm reloading.  A lot of guys new to reloading will crimp the piss out of the casing thinking it holds the bullets better.  For coated bullets this is incorrect.  The resizing die constricts the casing and this is what holds the bullet, the crimp for 9mm is a taper crimp and only removes the bell you put in the case.  Don't over crimp and damage the coating or accuracy will suffer and leading will occur.  Just remove the bell, crimp to 0.379" and never worry about the diameter of the bullet you load again.

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37 minutes ago, BJB said:

I don't load those specific bullets but I bet somebody who does chimes in soon. 

 

As stated, plunk test them all.  The OAL in one barrel might be too long in the other.  Plunk test, find your OAL, then shorten it a little more.  Also, when you chrono keep in mind that each firearm will produce a different power factor with the same load because the G19 has a 4" barrel and the Springfield has a 5".  You can produce different OAL loads for each barrel if you so desire but that isn't strictly necessary, and can actually get confusing with a lot of guns in the mix.  My short leade chambers dictate my OAL when loading 9mm, so for the longer leade chambers the OAL would seem much too short.  In reality I haven't see a change in accuracy at 25 yards with a very short OAL versus what would be considered the optimum OAL.  One thing to be aware of if you have to go to a very short OAL is spiking chamber pressures, so you might have to back off the powder just a smidgen.  The required OAL can vary considerably d/t the different bullet geometry, ogive, etc.  What will stay somewhat more consistent is the volume remaining under the bullet inside the case, the boiler room if you will.  When you start compressing this volume is when spiking can occur.  Titegroup can spike very fast.

 

Also, if you haven't loaded coated bullets before you'll find crimp can play a big factor in accuracy and/or leading.  Please use the search feature and investigate crimp for 9mm reloading.  A lot of guys new to reloading will crimp the piss out of the casing thinking it holds the bullets better.  For coated bullets this is incorrect.  The resizing die constricts the casing and this is what holds the bullet, the crimp for 9mm is a taper crimp and only removes the bell you put in the case.  Don't over crimp and damage the coating or accuracy will suffer and leading will occur.  Just remove the bell, crimp to 0.379" and never worry about the diameter of the bullet you load again.

Thanks for all this info. Definitely helps a lot. I will Plunk test them all when they ship. Hopefully the OAL from the plunk test will not be too close to the Minimum OAL stated in the load data. Alliant provides this, while titegroup does not. Since they will be the same type of bullet (Coated RN) can I use the same Minimum OAL as reference? 

 

For instance, Alliant sport pistol shows minimum OAL at 1.05 for 124 gr coated RN. Can I use this minimum OAL with titegroup? 

 

Not sure if I’m explaining it correctly, but my question is, is OAL relative to powder type? (Sport pistol) vs Titegroup Or bullet type? (Coated RN, FP, etc)

 

 

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11 minutes ago, JohnS23 said:

Not sure if I’m explaining it correctly, but my question is, is OAL relative to powder type? (Sport pistol) vs Titegroup Or bullet type? (Coated RN, FP, etc)

OAL for you is relative to the bullets you use and your gun. Powder data should be used as a safe starting load once you have found the OAL for the bullets you're using in your gun/s. Good suggestions from Memphis Mechanic above:

"3.8 titegroup and a coated 124

3.2 titegroup and a coated 147

 

Load as long as your guns chambers will accomodate."

 

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As stated by previous posters, OAL is specific to your bullet & your chamber leade.  You have to determine it.  The OAL listed in manuals is a kind of guide if you will but it is still only relevant to that particular bullet and chamber leade.  These powder charge weights guys are giving you are all good suggestions and are on the lower end if you look at it.  They should all power factor at 130 to 135 or so.  This is not pushing it as far as safety goes by any means.  

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