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Tuning stock 2 for reliability


Honeybooboo

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I just bought a new stock 2 in 9mm. Pretty much an impulse buy so I don't know much about them. Going to shoot it stock to get a feel for it but I know I'm going to want to work on the trigger and stuff.

I want to set off factory ammo with no problems. I see guys are using 13lb mainsprings. If I use a 14lb will I keep that reliability?

What about the extended firing pin and reduced firing pin spring?

I also see that everyone recommends the 1 piece sear. What benefits does that provide? How about the Titan hammer?

Finally, what recoil spring weight? I plan on shooting Atlanta arms' 147g round that makes 130pf with a 4.5" barrel.

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Everything you said makes sense...a 10lb recoil spring would be good...although you could go 8lb. The 13 lb hammer spring may not set off some harder primers in DA.

Cool. Guess a 14 or 15lb mainspring and 10lb recoil spring it is. Does the mainspring help SA too or just DA?

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I use CCI primers with stock hammer and the xtreme light hammer spring and FP spring. I tried the Wolff hammer spring and it stacks too much. I wouldn't recommend them at all. Always use the same weight springs together. Example, use the light hammer and light FP spring together. Don't mix and match with the medium and light.

I also have an extended FP. I believe that is a must.

I have the one piece sear and other work done to it, but that won't affect lighting off primers. The one piece sear will take 8oz off the trigger pull.

After you do all the work, make sure the FPB still works.

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I use CCI primers with stock hammer and the xtreme light hammer spring and FP spring. I tried the Wolff hammer spring and it stacks too much. I wouldn't recommend them at all. Always use the same weight springs together. Example, use the light hammer and light FP spring together. Don't mix and match with the medium and light.

I also have an extended FP. I believe that is a must.

I have the one piece sear and other work done to it, but that won't affect lighting off primers. The one piece sear will take 8oz off the trigger pull.

After you do all the work, make sure the FPB still works.

Ok so maybe the EGD medium hammer spring and medium firing pin spring with the extended firing pin?

Then the Titan hammer, 1 piece sear, and 10lb recoil spring.

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Polish everything (following the instructions in posts here). Extreme sear, firing pin, titan hammer, extended firing pin block and 13# hammer spring.

Before starting, put a new #2 pencil in the barrel (eraser first) and shoot it straght up in da and sa. Mark down those distances. After swapping parts and through polidhing it should shoot the same pencil very close to the same distance. If not, you need finer polishing and/or have something hanging rubbing. I found the holes in the frame and slide (trigger plunger, hammer strut, firing pin and FP block) needed to be really worked over on three of four I did. The firing pin block is commonly found to slow the firing pin.

Doing all that stuff has made mine reliable.

But! A buddy shooting factory ammo had issues. The primers were NOT seated fully (yeah, even the factory can bugger stuff up). I manually set them deeper on a single stage press and reliability went back to 100%. The "pencil test" helped figure it out. It's also good to validate everything is still working the same prior to a match. Maybe I'm nuts, but I want a definitive test to show springs and things are still good.

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You don't have to do any sear change or hammer change if you don't want to.

Just change the hammer spring, plunger spring, firing pin spring, extended firing pin and recoil spring. Other than that, smooth and polish everything!

I have 2 of them and that is all I have done to mine and I've shot them for 3 seasons now on just those changes alone.

There is no fitting involved at all with those changes. If you change sears and hammer there will be fitting involved. It's not hard to do, but if you want small changes and no fitting, go the route I did. My trigger pulls are 6.5#da and 3#sa.

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You don't have to do any sear change or hammer change if you don't want to.

Just change the hammer spring, plunger spring, firing pin spring, extended firing pin and recoil spring. Other than that, smooth and polish everything!

I have 2 of them and that is all I have done to mine and I've shot them for 3 seasons now on just those changes alone.

There is no fitting involved at all with those changes. If you change sears and hammer there will be fitting involved. It's not hard to do, but if you want small changes and no fitting, go the route I did. My trigger pulls are 6.5#da and 3#sa.

Yes if you want reliability do this ^^^^^^

I personally like to run a clipped Wolff 14. Clip the flat coil off to reduce stacking.

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You don't have to do any sear change or hammer change if you don't want to.

Just change the hammer spring, plunger spring, firing pin spring, extended firing pin and recoil spring. Other than that, smooth and polish everything!

I have 2 of them and that is all I have done to mine and I've shot them for 3 seasons now on just those changes alone.

There is no fitting involved at all with those changes. If you change sears and hammer there will be fitting involved. It's not hard to do, but if you want small changes and no fitting, go the route I did. My trigger pulls are 6.5#da and 3#sa.

Yes if you want reliability do this ^^^^^^

I personally like to run a clipped Wolff 14. Clip the flat coil off to reduce stacking.

This sounds like a solid plan. I'll go this route to start and can always add the hammer and sear if I want to go further or get a 2nd gun if I like it.

With the egw hammer spring what pound is the medium weight one comparable to? I imagine 14-15lb if the stock is 16lb. And I'd guess the light is around 13lb?

O and a link to the plunger spring?

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Thanks for the help. Based on this and more research here is what I'll do.

EGD medium hammer spring

EGD medium firing pin spring

EGD firing pin

EGD guide rod with 10lb recoil spring

18 or 20lb plunger spring.

Then maybe I'll have a gunsmith do a light polishing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I personally like to run a clipped Wolff 14. Clip the flat coil off to reduce stacking.

^^^ I was force to buy the 14# since 13 are out of stock....... isn't it the 14# shorter ?? How the stacking if the 14 trimmed is used ???

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have my parts and will be going to the gunsmith tomorrow. I want to have a pro polish everything. I don't want to bubba smith anything, even though it's just polishing and putting some springs in. EGD medium mainspring and firing pin spring, henning firing pin, and an 18 or 20lb plunger spring. Interested to see what this results in with all the polishing.

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I would be selective of whom tunes an EAA or CZ type gun..... or do it your self with the help of all the great guides posted here on this site. Just because there is a sign that says "gunsmith" over their door, doesn't mean they won't butcher your piece if they haven't worked on the type before.

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I would be selective of whom tunes an EAA or CZ type gun..... or do it your self with the help of all the great guides posted here on this site. Just because there is a sign that says "gunsmith" over their door, doesn't mean they won't butcher your piece if they haven't worked on the type before.

What could be butchered if you are paying attention to not changing any angles?

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I would be selective of whom tunes an EAA or CZ type gun..... or do it your self with the help of all the great guides posted here on this site. Just because there is a sign that says "gunsmith" over their door, doesn't mean they won't butcher your piece if they haven't worked on the type before.

What could be butchered if you are paying attention to not changing any angles?

The hard part is knowing what to pay attention to.

What's that old saying? Mistakes are what you get from not paying attention. Experience is what you get after making mistakes, wisdom is what you get from experience. Or something along those lines.

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I would be selective of whom tunes an EAA or CZ type gun..... or do it your self with the help of all the great guides posted here on this site. Just because there is a sign that says "gunsmith" over their door, doesn't mean they won't butcher your piece if they haven't worked on the type before.

What could be butchered if you are paying attention to not changing any angles?
The hard part is knowing what to pay attention to.

What's that old saying? Mistakes are what you get from not paying attention. Experience is what you get after making mistakes, wisdom is what you get from experience. Or something along those lines.

Well now I don't know if I should. This shop seems pretty legit but it seems like they do a lot of 1911 trigger jobs, slide and bushing fitting, milling and machining, etc.
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I strongly recommend sending it off to a reputable gunsmith who knows the mechanism. It's cheaper in the long run and you're less likely to ruin the frame. Jim Bodkin does outstanding work.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk[/quote

Good point. I've heard good thing about Jim. Contacted him and hopefully will get it out to him soon.

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If you feel comfortable tearing the gun down to the frame and you have patience, I would say there is not reason you shouldn't be able to swap the parts and do the polishing yourself. Especially if you have shot the gun for a little while already, you should be able to look at the action, figure out how it works, and just polish all the surfaces that rub, slide, or rotate against other surfaces. You should be able to see what is rubbing because parts that started black will now have shiny spots where they make regular contact with other parts. There are plenty of detailed threads here too, just take the time to read through them and get comfortable with the mechanism.

Also BTW, the standard CZ firing pin spring works as a great plunger spring in tanfo's if you already haven't spend the money on the Henning one. The cz part is just a lot cheaper...

Good Luck!

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If you feel comfortable tearing the gun down to the frame and you have patience, I would say there is not reason you shouldn't be able to swap the parts and do the polishing yourself. Especially if you have shot the gun for a little while already, you should be able to look at the action, figure out how it works, and just polish all the surfaces that rub, slide, or rotate against other surfaces. You should be able to see what is rubbing because parts that started black will now have shiny spots where they make regular contact with other parts. There are plenty of detailed threads here too, just take the time to read through them and get comfortable with the mechanism.

Also BTW, the standard CZ firing pin spring works as a great plunger spring in tanfo's if you already haven't spend the money on the Henning one. The cz part is just a lot cheaper...

Good Luck!

Probably could do it taking my time but I'd rather just have a pro do it. Went out to Bodkin today so I'm excited to get it back.

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I use CCI primers with stock hammer and the xtreme light hammer spring and FP spring. I tried the Wolff hammer spring and it stacks too much. I wouldn't recommend them at all. Always use the same weight springs together. Example, use the light hammer and light FP spring together. Don't mix and match with the medium and light.

I also have an extended FP. I believe that is a must.

I have the one piece sear and other work done to it, but that won't affect lighting off primers. The one piece sear will take 8oz off the trigger pull.

After you do all the work, make sure the FPB still works.

Completely inaccurate.

The Wolff is sprung lighter, allowing you to feel the 'stack' that is in the interrupter. Springs don't 'stack;' it's the angle of the disconnector.

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