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Kita brings a girlfriend to the range.


kita
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I've been bringing friends to the range to try and get more females involved in the shooting sports. I took a home video of teaching my friend to shoot for the first time. Is there anything I am missing? Is there anything I need to do differently? I plan to continue getting my friends involved in shooting and would appreciate any pointers.

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I think the first thing I would do is put a few more rounds downrange myself just so they got used to the noise. Then I would have them dry fire a little, as it's hard to pay attention to learning how to work the trigger straight to the rear with the distraction of the round about to go off.

Also, I double plug to this day... and would highly suggest any beginner I was working with to do the same.

Otherwise nicely done!

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I thought you did a good job of putting her at ease. Just some suggestions;

1. There are a few YouTube videos like this one -->

that show an animated semi-automatic, if you search around you can find one for several types of guns. They are great for showing how the gun works and what happens each time the trigger is pressed. It may be a good idea to show your students that before you get to the range.

2. Also before getting to the range, show them how to hold the gun while its empty and some indication of how to stand, this is a lot of information to take in all at once. Perhaps show them at home how to dry fire, get some snap caps so you can show them how to load, unload, show clear, what to look for to check that the gun is clear.

3. On the subject of stance, get them to stand upright with their arms locked out in front of them, then push them backwards to simulate the push of the gun, keep pushing backward and tell them to adjust their feet and legs until you are no longer able to push them around, this will be a good indicator of how they can absorb the kick of the gun by adjusting their stance.

4. How the sights work can also be done away from the range, perhaps do all this dry-fire stuff a day before range day so they can let it sink in, then go over the basics again while at the range for live-fire.

I learned something from your video, the student was confused by down-range... I always take that for granted that everyone knows what it means, I thought the way you explained that was excellent.

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I had to laugh several times but I also came to a realization that some people do not know the very simple terminology. The way I thought my girl to shoot was almost completely through dry fire and she does great at that. She is a left as well and that's terrible haha. One thing she has a problem with is aligning the sights properly and pulling straight back on the trigger. I have drawn examples and shown her proper techniques and no matter what she dips the shots low right when she's shooting at a little range. I can not seem to figure out why she does it and want someone else to show her just in case my technique just doesn't work for her.

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I had to laugh several times but I also came to a realization that some people do not know the very simple terminology. The way I thought my girl to shoot was almost completely through dry fire and she does great at that. She is a left as well and that's terrible haha. One thing she has a problem with is aligning the sights properly and pulling straight back on the trigger. I have drawn examples and shown her proper techniques and no matter what she dips the shots low right when she's shooting at a little range. I can not seem to figure out why she does it and want someone else to show her just in case my technique just doesn't work for her.

Low right (for a lefty) is a flinch. Many want to tighten the grip of the string hand to "hold" the gun better when it goes off. Doing so, they milk the grip.

IMO, fixing it is a matter of fixing the grip and stance.

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How do you give advice to someone who is married to one of the world's top shooters? I would rather ask you for advice. ;)

You want advice on how to marry one of the top shooters?

Sure, well maybe. Can you send a picture of her gun?

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I would try to talk less and have the student do more, because a lot of perfectly sensible advice means nothing to someone who doesn't have any context for it. So, bring plenty of snap-caps, have the student load the magazine, insert the magazine, rack the slide, etc. as soon as possible and get through those first dozen reps of learning how to manipulate the gun, get a good grip, get into a solid stance, etc.

I might also recommend a .22 to start.

Edited by Not-So-Mad Matt
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  • 7 months later...

Overall, I would say very good instruction.

These are my thoughts and please just take them for what you think they are worth. Me personally, I would give a bit of instruction in a class room setting (where you can use a white board or paper to draw or write information and certain concepts) prior to going to the range. That instruction would include the gun safety rules, grip, stance, sight alignment, loading the magazines, chambering rounds into the semi-auto pistol, etc. I think it would also take a new shooter out of the "hot seat" and make for a slightly more relaxed setting.

If you have a semi-auto in 22LR, that might be a better start for teaching basic gun handling fundamentals and then move up to a larger caliber weapon.

I also use this video when working with certain women or people that may lack strength and hand dexterity:

Again, overall I think you did a great job and keep it up! We need high profile people like you to introduce as many new shooters as you can to the sport.

Edited by JMike
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I'm going to let the instructor side of me take over for this.

While it isn't strictly necessary, a checklist is a very good thing to have, even with a friend. Treat this the same as if you were being paid to teach a course. It's very easy when you are going over things to get side tracked by questions so that you forget something. Forget the wrong thing and there could be a problem.

It's also good if the shooter has some kind of checklist that they can make notes on.

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