Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Dry fire draw...


JaeOne3345
 Share

Recommended Posts

Any pointers/tips in regards to my draw?

I feel like I can minimize wasted movement but not really sure where or how to go about doing so.

Am I moving my shoulders too much going for the draw?

0.7 set on the timer (which is probably too fast for me right now but was trying to push it) to 1/3 scale target 10 feet away. Just for a sight picture. No trigger press.

Getting batteries for the smoke detector in the morning. Started going off tonight. LOL.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nroCbSOvM-E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or5LHsyUaDo

Thanks!

Edited by JaeOne3345
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you prepping the trigger? I line the top of my head up with a point behind me and look in the mirror to make sure my uead is not moving, dropping. Keep it still. About the only way to improve is to push yourself. The way I did ( I have about the same set up as you, DAA and limited gun) I started at 1.0. The grip has to be perfect every time. Then work it down to .7 by dropping a tenth at a time. grip still perfect. Then go to .65 - .60 -.55 - finally the .50. About 30 days of dry fire and the added speed should feel normal. Then when you dry fire you can start at .7 or.6 just to stay ontop of the speed and perfect grip. Hope this helps. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Start from a state of relaxation. In that second video you started out smooth then midway through, it looked like you weren't giving yourself a chance to settle before drawing again. Also, having too much tension slows the muscles down. Try getting a plyometric explosion off the beep, then coast into the shot. Think about throwing a punch. If you hold tension though the entire punch it will be slower than a punch that is launched quickly and powerfully but allowed to travel to the target without tension.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm just a noob, so this is more of a question for you and the other posters than it is a suggestion to you, JaeOne. In dry fire practice, can bad habits be created by not finishing the draw with a controlled trigger press on target? I have been "racing the clock" with my dry fire at the end, not sights on target. In my mind, that seems like a better way to skin the cat. Any motion you repeat enough times will be resorted back to under stress (buzzer). I am in the process of reading Dave Grossman's book "On Combat". In there, he tells of an old police training tactic that got a couple of guys hurt. At the qualification/practice range, they were having the trainees draw, fire two rounds, and reholster. In the heat of a deadly force encounter, a few of those officers drew their weapon, fired two rounds at the suspect then holstered their weapon while the assailants were still firing back! lol.. Now I don't really think you, JaeOne, are going to forget to shoot the target after your draw in a big match. But the habit of not prepping and pressing the trigger with the front sight on target could cost you a split second hesitation that could add up. Or maybe in your practice you inadvertently just start concentrating on your draw mechanics so closely that you get lazy with finding the front sight at the end without even realizing you're doing it? For me, I need all the help I can get. I don't want to do anything that will cost me any more time than I'll cost myself! So from you more experienced guys, am I thinking about it a little too hard or is this valid reasoning?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish the racemaster could be dropped just a bit lower.

Kinda frustrating that they won't produce a longer hanger.

I ask Saul about an extended/longer arm. He said that it is a long as he can make it, and the holster still he legal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you think about canting the holster just a little bit more so the muzzle is a little more forward and the grip is a little more level? It looks like your bending the wrist a little more than you should have to, and kind of reaching back or canting the hand rearward in order to a grip on the gun. Something isn't looking as smooth as it should be as your gripping the gun in the holster, and I think more rearward cant might help that. But, my perception may not be your reality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I wish the racemaster could be dropped just a bit lower.

Kinda frustrating that they won't produce a longer hanger.

I had the exact same thought last when when I used my racemaster for the first time. I dont need it right away so I'm giving the hanger to my machinist friend to copy just an 1-1.5" longer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish the racemaster could be dropped just a bit lower.

Kinda frustrating that they won't produce a longer hanger.

I had the exact same thought last when when I used my racemaster for the first time. I dont need it right away so I'm giving the hanger to my machinist friend to copy just an 1-1.5" longer

When you get yours done, if you will let us know the 411 about it $ and such. If you can or want to do more, I'm in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try:

Left hand over closer to the gun as soon as you get the beep.

Don't push down on the gun when it is in the holster (doesn't look like you are doing it that much)

I think you are looking good, just keep pushing and see where you end up.

Creepy. I see what you see. I've been brainwashed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to go fast---just let it happen, relax, react and do more i.e. mag change, movement. How many times do we just stand and shoot?

For those who are just starting out, would it be a good idea to practice the movements at a stand-still first to learn muscle memory of the basic draw and reloading functions? Then as that becomes second nature, incorporate movement?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It appears you have a bit of a lean forward at the start of your draw stroke and then a lean back as you push out to present the gun to target.

I was tracking your body/head/neck position in relation to the bottles on the top shelf and there was a definite to/fro going on. Not necessarily a dramatic observation and it was not clearly evident on every draw. I'd think it (keeping the head/neck upper body still) might matter most on a stand-n-shoot where there is no movement. Probably doesn't matter much, if at all, on a field course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aren't hands supposed to be "relaxed at sides"? Your gun elbow is bent and your off hand is in front of you.

Not picking on you JaeOne, this seems to be a common trend.

If I'm ROing, I wouldn't start you in that position.

Edited by BillD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Too much head movement.

The other thing to consider is that physically drawing the gun and pointing it out in front of you is only half the equation. You need to be able to hit what you are shooting at with a high level of consistency. There are a lot of people who can physically draw the gun, point it and drop the hammer within .70 second. There are NOT a lot of people who can do a .70 draw and actually hit exactly where they are shooting at. If you are simply slamming the gun out in front of you trying to beat a par time but sacrificing your ability to actually hit what you are shooting at then you are wasting your time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aren't hands supposed to be "relaxed at sides"? Your gun elbow is bent and your off hand is in front of you.

Not picking on you JaeOne, this seems to be a common trend.

If I'm ROing, I wouldn't start you in that position.

I understand about the weak hand being in front of you. But Your elbows are bent, "hands relaxed at sides" most people's elbows are bent. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...