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Is there a procedure for calibrating steel?


ProGunGuy
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  • 3 months later...
  • 5 months later...

Comment [TT33]:

Added to help MDs and ACs fulfill their requirements to ensure all repeat shooters are IDPA members.

Comment [TT34]:

Added to improve accuracy of target scoring and to removes any perception of impropriety.

Comment [TT35]:

Added to improve accuracy of target scoring and to removes any perception of impropriety.

Comment [TT36]:

Added to provide consistent reactive target performance during a match and match to match

4.24

Calibration of Reactive Targets

4.24.1.

Reactive targets must physically react to score. All reactive targets in a Sanctioned Match, poppers, plates, etc., will be calibrated so they will react properly with a "good hit" using the lowest power factor ammunition allowed in any division. The Match Director or designee will calibrate all reactive targets in a match before the first shot is fired in competition each day and at the Match Director’s discretion throughout the match. The stage SOs can call for a reactive target calibration on their stage at any time if deemed necessary.

4.24.2.

The Match Director will provide a 9mm or 38 Special firearm and ammunition that together does not exceed the lowest power-factor (105PF) of any division. This firearm and ammunition combination will be used throughout the match for calibration and calibration challenges with no changes.

4.24.3.

Targets must be situated to minimize shift, twist, or move during a match, so that proper calibration is not lost as the match continues.

4.24.4.

To calibrate a reactive target, fire one round at the target from the most likely firing position in the stage and hit the calibration zone of the target. If the target does not react properly, change the target setup and repeat. The target must react correctly three times in a row to be deemed properly calibrated. If the calibration zone is missed, repeat this step.

4.24.5.

If during a CoF a reactive target does not react properly when hit, the competitor has three choices.

4.24.5.1.

The competitor shoots the target until it reacts properly, the target is scored as hit, and the stage score stands. In this case, no calibration challenge will be allowed.

4.24.5.2.

The target does not react properly and the shooter does not challenge the calibration, the target is scored as a miss and the stage score stands. A challenge after the shooter knows the stage score or individual target scores will not be allowed.

4.24.5.3.

The target does not react properly to a hit and the shooter wishes to challenge the calibration. The challenge must be made to the SO running the shooter, immediately after the "Range Is Clear" command is given, and before the shooter knows the stage score or the individual target scores. Challenges occurring after this point will not be allowed. Whether the shooter completed the stage or not does not affect the challenge process. When an appropriate challenge is made the reactive target and the surrounding area will not be touched or interfered with by anyone until calibration is checked. As part of the challenge process, the SO will immediately collect 7 rounds of ammunition from those used in the stage from the shooter and these will be sent to the chronograph for testing.

4.24.6.

If the target is touched or interfered with by match staff, MD, SOs or another competitor, the shooter will be given a reshoot.

4.24.7.

If the target is touched or interfered with by the shooter or designee the target will be scored as a miss and the CoF will be deemed completed. If the shooter did not complete the stage then Incomplete Stage scoring will be used to determine the shooter's score for this stage.

4.24.8.

Should the target fall without interference prior to calibration (i.e. wind, etc.) the shooter will be given a reshoot.

4.24.9.

Calibration Checking Process

4.24.9.1.

One round will be fired at the reactive target calibration zone from the same position as the shooter used to engage the target.

4.24.9.2.

If the target is hit in the calibration zone or below and the target reacts properly, the calibration is deemed correct and the target will be scored as a miss. If the shooter did not complete the stage then Incomplete Stage scoring will be used to determine the shooter's score for the stage.

4.24.9.3.

If the target is hit above the calibration zone, the Calibration Checking Process failed and the shooter will be given a reshoot.

4.24.9.4.

If the target is hit anywhere on the score-able surface and the target does not react properly, the target calibration will be deemed improper, and the shooter will be given a reshoot after the target is recalibrated.

4.24.9.5.

If the target is missed, fire another round at the calibration zone.

4.24.9.6.

No matter what the outcome of this process may be, the shooter's ammunition will still be tested to see if it meets or exceeds power factor. Normal chronograph processes and penalties apply.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Our MD went around using a 9mm with loads that were just under the needed chrono numbers and hit each of the steel targets at or below the bottom of the "good hit" or round sections to do it. Worked really well, no calibration calls during the match at all.

Close... I used a GP100 with over the counter Remington UMC .38 130's. They would not pass chrono unless you pointed the muzzle up first. And I did have to "check calibration" a couple times.

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  • 3 months later...

It doesn't matter if the gun is legal for IDPA does it? As long as it's either 9mm or .38 special and the ammo, through that gun, doesn't exceed 105PF.

While there isn't a definitive rule about this, if you're having to use the gun to "check calibration" you should definitely use an IDPA legal gun.

One less thing for someone to protest.

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Who cares if it's a legal gun? If the gun and ammo make the right power factor, god bless you for doing it.

I know you haven't done it yet Steve, but when you have to step in front of a whole squad and "check calibration" with a pistol that's not IDPA legal you're asking for an argument. Why make it difficult? You're at a sanctioned IDPA match, just use an IDPA legal gun.

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I think if you were to challenge the calibration and someone strolled out with a 6" revolver and you were a SSR shooter.

It would cause more problems than if they had a legal gun.

The loads may only make the 105PF thru the Gun but I think it would just get ugly.

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I was asking because I don't want to have to use my IDPA legal 9mm and try and keep the "bunny fart calibration ammo" seperated from my makes SSP PF 9mm ammo. I'd rather load some .38 special up and use my safe queen revolver. I'd have to double check, but I think the barrel is too long to be IDPA legal.

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It is also important to remember that just becasue steel is calibrated at the beginning of the match, doesn't mean it will not change at some point during the match. All it takes is for the angle to change slightly due to the base being pulled up, or the nut working itself in.

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Exactly. At our last State Match it had rained the day before. During Match day the poppers slowly beat themselves into the soft ground. We had to reset and check calibration a couple times. I also had a prop failure which required swapping in a spare tip-out. All of these things took time. ANYTHING you can do to get up and running quickly, while doing things correctly should be done.

Avoid conflict where possible. Every question takes time.

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I liked it better when a balky popper was just considered a range equipment malfunction. The benefit of the doubt went to the shooter and he got an automatic reshoot.

A popper, either fortunately or unfortunately, is designed to recognize power, and it's also a mechanical device that is susceptible to the laws of nature. That's what the calibration procedure is trying to address. Sometimes there are bona fide failures, like when subtle changes in the environment throw it out of calibration, or when someone whacks it and it falls partway. I don't think it would be fair to call every ding on a popper where it doesn't fall range failure.

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