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Wrists locked?


JD45

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I've always tried to lock my wrist joint I guess, but I'm rereading Brian's book again.

I had missed the part about keeping your wrists flexible the first few times. Could you explain this , benos? Do top guys do this now?

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I might have missed something along the way, but I don't even quite get the concept of locking the wrists. I can tense the muscles in my hands, or in my forearms, but can't consciously lock my wrists.

I'm with this guy. Both my wrists are jacked up but now that somebody else has said it maybe I'm not so specail. I can lock a knee, elbow, finger maybe a few other joints but I have yet to figure out how to lock a wrist.

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By "locked" I believe folks mean keeping the support hand in your two handed grip at the downward limit.

Thumb more aligned with forearm. Extend your support hand in a handshake and tilt hand to downward limit... add to firing grip...tense muscles up...."locked wrists."

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Thinking about it, grip pressure effectively locks the wrists, or makes them less prone to moving. Forearm muscles are involved in exerting grip pressure, and forearms are connected to the hands through the wrists. If I relax my hand, the wrist is also relaxed. If I exert grip pressure, the wrist becomes more rigid.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I read an article from the " Great One". He suggests locking the wrists for better recoil control and muzzle flip. I tried it and seemed the front sight returned faster and the same spot on the target a lot faster. As someone suggested. Try it. Works for me.

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  • 2 weeks later...

You can lock the wrists somewhat by tensing your forearms. This naturally tenses the hands somewhat since the forearm muscles controls the hands.

That plus a tight grip locks the wrists as much as they can be locked.

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I think my issue ( haven't had a chance to test this with live fire yet) is not gripping hard enough. I have a firm grip but I'm thinking and hoping clamping down on it will make a difference.

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  • 8 months later...

By "locked" I believe folks mean keeping the support hand in your two handed grip at the downward limit.

Thumb more aligned with forearm. Extend your support hand in a handshake and tilt hand to downward limit... add to firing grip...tense muscles up...."locked wrists."

This.

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WristS. Plural. Rotating the support hand forward affects one wrist. And even when the support hand is canted forward, that wrist can still move. If consensus is that support hand forward-canting is what is meant by locking the wrists, fine.

If you need to cant your support hand forward to mitigate your muzzle flip sufficiently, of course you should do that, and a lot of shooters do.

Whether I use a fully forward-canted support hand or simply increase my support hand grip, I get the same muzzle-flip-mitigating effect. Anyway, the angle of my hand is scarcely different between when I consciously cant fully forward, or not. My thumb tends to stick up and if I simply relax it, my grip looks just the same as the fully-canted version.

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Anyway, I really have no religion about it. I use shooters like CHA-LEE as models for what I'm striving for. Near-zero muzzle flip, as he shows in a video on the forum, would be nice.

I practiced yesterday with runs using consciously fully forward-canted support hand gripping, and then my more "natural" support hand grip. The two are not far apart.

Muzzle flip is evident in this video but I'm hitting all A's.

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