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Steve Anderson's Dry Fire Drills


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The above tag line says it all...if you are willing to work, these drills will help you get there.

There are 38 drills in three categories: Core Classifier Skills, Match Skills, and Simulated Plate Rack Drills. (a 2x4 and paper plates :))

I put these drills together after identifying the weaknesses in my shooting that I wanted to correct. I was also inspired by the realization that most classifiers were 6 reload 6 on fairly similar target arrays. After every match, I designed a new drill to remedy whetever went wrong. These drills are the result of that process, and I am very confident they will help anyone the way they have helped me.

Ordering is easy at andersonshooting.com, and I can/will ship anywhere in the world.

For international orders, please email for a shipping quote.

For a limited time, our host Brian Enos will send a FREE copy of his book, "Practical Shooting: Beyond Fundamentals" to anyone who buys a Pact timer from his online store after buying a copy of my book. I'll send the secret code for the deal with your copy of my book.

I plan to feature a different drill in this space every month or so to help give everyone an idea of what to expect in the book. Please feel free to post questions and/or comments and reviews here as well.

Many thanks to Kyle "Flexmoney" Farris for the technical editing, SigLady for the graphics and Kathy Littman for the refinement.

Steve Anderson

mr.anderson@prodigy.net

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When either dry-firing at home or practicing at the range, if you've ever wondered - "Well, what should I practice today?" - then Steve's book is a must have. His organized drills will guide you from beginning presentation skills to advanced multiple-target engagement and transition techniques. It's the practical shooting student's perfect compliment to Practical Shooting, Beyond Fundamentals.

:D

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I couldn't agree more!!!! I would dryfire, but I never had a purpose as to what to work on or how to go about it, eventhough I knew what I needed to work on!! I didn't have something keeping me focused on the task at hand. With a busy life and children, it's easy to loose sight and not focus on what needs to be practiced and what doesn't. It's easy to practice the things that are fun but as you know, what it boils down to is practicing the things that aren't fun and that makes the difference in the end. This book/manual forces you to want to work on your weak points and make your strong points better. You can't go wrong buying this book, and if you don't have Brian's book, Practical Shooting, Beyond Fundamentals, you definately need that too. It'll be the best money spent!!!!!!

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Here is the first drill, with help from Flexmoney:

drill1.jpg

This is the first dry fire drill I did on a regular basis. It aids draw speed, draw consistency,

and most important, it teaches you what you need to see to fire your first shot out the holster.

The catch is, you won't pull the trigger. When doing dry fire drills, the temptation to mash

the trigger to beat the par time is huge, and is also counterproductive.

Instead, get that thing outta the holster and into an acceptable sight picture and stop. Then do

it again, only a little faster.

I just recently got into .5 on this one after pushing it hard one night.

The other 37 drills in the book follow the same format.

Thanks for looking,

Steve

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I just received a copy of Steve's book today. It's so good and so well done, that's actually tough to describe qualitatively. I will say this:

A gazillion books have been written about shooting. Until now, there was only one book that really mattered: Brian's.

Now there are two.

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My copy of the drybook arrived the other day, and I'm loving it. In just the little time I've spent dryfiring (with drills and help I culled from these forums) I am completely convinced that regimented, purposeful dryfire practice is the answer to the question: how do I get better? Especially for those of us with limited funds and a non-shooting day job. :) This book is the course syllabus. Brian is on the money when says it's the perfect compliment to The Book. It's The DryBook!

- Gabe

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SVI,

You'll make a great guinea pig! :)

What problems are you having?

This is the first drill I ever designed and has gotten me down in the high .50s dry, and the low .60s live fire for the first shot at 15-21 ft.

If you want to do this "on the air" post you current par time on the drill. OR, message me so I can see where you are starting.

Remember, do NOT pull the trigger on this drill in dry fire. Draw to an A at 15 ft.

Thanks for "biting" :)

SA

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Fireant,

It's all explained in the book, but basically you need to figure out what your current time is for each drill. That's your baseline par time.

Most timers (you will need a timer) have the ability to sound a second tone after a programmable amount of time has passed. This is called a par time, you just start with a generous par time, and see if you can complete the drill, seeing all A's in the amount of time between the first and second tone. If you can, decrease it until you can JUST complete the drill before the second tone. That's your baseline par time. Now, let's beat it. :)

Thanks for the order, and let me know if you have any other questions.

SA

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Got my book today, thx Steve (hats off the the postal service 4 days across the ocean) looks like what I've been looking for, but my timer went to timer heaven after 5min of the first drill... bummer...

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Hi, my name is Kevin and I'm a ... dry fire addict!

It all started when this guy sold me a book - well, that's not quite true, it had started a few months before but that was just dabbling and easily managed in 10 minutes a day. Then this book appeared listing lots of drills, emphasizing specific practices and generally promising real progress. It had been proven to work by the author and if we'd just follow the steps, we could all stop getting sand kicked in our faces at the range (Aside: Steve really could use a Charles Atlas ad for the book :lol:)

So, I set aside 30 minutes every morning to work through the book. It's only 30 minutes, I thought, I can handle it.

But there's always 1 more rep, or doing the next drill as well, or going back to work on an earlier drill again 'cause you've noticed something. There's never the "I don't know what to do next, I must be done" feeling. The 30 minutes regularly becomes 40 (or more) ... and I often find myself going back in the evening and doing more. Like all addicitions, this one seems so innocuous at first but be warned, it can take over your life ...

However unlike most addictions, it seems that this one actually has some positive effects on some aspects of your (shooting) life, so "THANKS, STEVE".

More seriously, the book is great and any one who is serious about training in this sport *needs* a copy.

:P:P:P:P

Kevin (who's managed to climb a few places up the ladder from last over all in the past few months and now has ambition to continue that trend :ph34r:)

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Hey guys, here's a video of drill #16 in live fire!

bill reload drill

Thanks again for the kind words and support. It means a lot that this sytem is helping other shooters.

On the time it takes, I've never kept track of the total time it takes to do them all, and I've never done all 38 in one session, but I did do the core classifier drills every day during my GM quest. I varied the reps based on how each was going, sometimes less, sometimes many more.

thanks again,

SA

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Steve,

I finally got my hands on a timer and have been doing the drills for the past week, all at least once some several times. It helped me win my first match (local lv II) this past weekend. :D

Have you ever felt that your live time was quicker than your dry time?

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Dalmas,

Live fire times may indeed be quicker than dry for some people.

I wish I could tell you exactly why, but I do have a theory:

I think tha sometimes the rhythm of the gun's recoil can speed things up a little, especially if we are seeing it in excellent detail.

With a gun that has no recoil between shots (dryfire) we are limited by the speed at which we pull (or think we can pull) the trigger.

Sometimes (hopefully all the time)in live fire, we are watching the gun return faster than we thought we could pull the trigger. Therefore, we don't know how fast we are firing...we are just shooting.

Does that help at all?

SA

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Steve,

Interesting, I was figuring along the same lines. My times are a bit slower because I use letter size targets at 21 feet (longest distance I could create in the house). A-zon is not very big. It was great goin to the match sunday shooting normal size targets - they feelt impossible to miss.

Have added two excersies with the gun on a table. Loaded and unloaded.

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Steve,

My timer hates you, it used to just lay around in the bag and maybe once a week would stick it's head out and say beep. It's been talking more than a ladies sewing circle and got tired and ate the battery. Well I bought it a 4 pack so now it is in trouble every day. I'm retired so the schedule is, Mon-Wed-Fri 30-45 min in the morning with 45-60 min at night. Tue-Thur range time mornings (200-300 rounds) 30 min dry fire evenings. Range time and drills are dependent on wind (30-40 MPH not unusal).

To stop shooting on brown and aim for a spot, I have placed a paster in the upper 3/4 of the A zone looking for that Kodak moment (TJ). Only if the sights are there can I pull the trigger, I am slower that way but at least I am able to call the shot. I am now able to keep my 50 yards shots in the A-C zone.

I have no doubt that a few months with your book will raise the average shooter a class or two.

Thank you. But I get to keep any trophys.

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