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Dry Fire: Short vs Long sessions - Which is more productive?

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I ask this question because, it seems like there are 2 camps when it comes to your daily dry fire and how much you need to do to get to a very competitive level.

 

I suppose the mentality behind the short (and when I say short, I mean 10-20 minutes) dry fire sessions, is that, perfect practice makes perfect. These people are more concerned with getting their correct reps in, and then calling it a day. (I've personally heard Eric Grauffel, and Keith Garcia mention these methodologies.)

 

Where as the mentality behind the longer (1.5 - 2.5 hours) sessions seems to be the same, but more focused on really dialing in the muscle memory portion, improving as fast as possible, and being a little less concerned with, for lack of a better term, "bad" practice. (I think as long as you're always cognizant of what you're doing and making sure you're not pushing for speed's sake, and getting clean, correct reps in, I don't see any reason why you couldn't go for that long personally). (I've personally heard a couple GM's mention recommend more this method of practice for fast improvement. And I think Ben Stoeger would lean towards this as well. He mentions both modes in his dry fire book, but labels 1.5 hour sessions as "Hardcore" sessions).

 

My hunch, is that, the professionals who do only recommend their 10-20 minutes of dry fire training a day, are probably more in "maintenance mode". They want to get their reps in to reinforce what they already are good at, and they are also probably in the camp that gets waaaaaaay more live range time than the average person. And again, my guess would be that they aren't striving for that vast "improvement" that a lot of us are, so they don't need to push that hard in their dry training (I.E. 10-20 minutes, I'm sure they're pushing in their training, but I'm talking more in bulk time invested).

 

With all that being said.

My question is:

What are your guy's opinions on how much daily dry fire one should be doing if they're looking to improve a lot, and as fast as is productively possible, and how much dry fire do you guys find yourselves doing daily?

 

Thanks!

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I think 15 mins a day can produce results over a long period of time. It makes you more consistent... blah blah blah. To make large strides in a skill set, you need to put in serious time. 45 mins + per session.

 

Consistency is the key with dry fire. If you do it daily... you will see massive results (Assuming you are honest with yourself). Going a week on... week off... or 3-4 days a week is not the way to do it. 7 days a week... 30-45 mins is a good goal to shoot for.

 

When I was grinding to GM I was doing 1 hour+ daily for a few months. Then tapered off as time went on. To the point I now take full breaks during the off season/winter. I'm just starting to ramp up dry fire now for major season. 30ish Mins is what Im going for now. Ill ramp that up when I get closer to matches/classes.

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I would say go as long as you can stay focused, but you can make great gains doing moderate training, 15-30 minutes a day 4-5 days a week.

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9 hours ago, Maximis228 said:

I think 15 mins a day can produce results over a long period of time. It makes you more consistent... blah blah blah. To make large strides in a skill set, you need to put in serious time. 45 mins + per session.

 

Consistency is the key with dry fire. If you do it daily... you will see massive results (Assuming you are honest with yourself). Going a week on... week off... or 3-4 days a week is not the way to do it. 7 days a week... 30-45 mins is a good goal to shoot for.

 

When I was grinding to GM I was doing 1 hour+ daily for a few months. Then tapered off as time went on. To the point I now take full breaks during the off season/winter. I'm just starting to ramp up dry fire now for major season. 30ish Mins is what Im going for now. Ill ramp that up when I get closer to matches/classes.

 

How rapidly did you improve on average with the hour daily of dryfire?

Edit: I guess a more specific question, how long did it take to go up x amount of classifications (B-A, A-M, etc.)

Edited by AJA
Clarification

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11 hours ago, AJA said:

 

How rapidly did you improve on average with the hour daily of dryfire?

Edit: I guess a more specific question, how long did it take to go up x amount of classifications (B-A, A-M, etc.)

 

I classified as a C initially. Didn't really dry fire at all and got to B. Started to dry fire regularly 15 mins a day and went from B - M in about 1 year. Then I quit my job. During my 3 months of unemployment I ramped up dry fire and live fire very hard and ended up making the M-GM jump in about 4-5 total months. I was dry firing over 1 hour per day and live firing 3-4 days a week. I tapered off dry fire length as time went on. Once I made M I was also running my local club and designing stages for the surrounding area clubs as well. Truth be told... 3 years later I ended up burning out a bit and cancelled a bunch of majors planned last summer. Took a nice long break and now im back and ready to grind again. I never took classes from anyone. Maybe that could have sped this process up a bit? IDK. Ill be taking my first USPSA class with JJ in a few weeks. Hope to revamp my training from it as my current practice sessions can feel stale.

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3 hours ago, Maximis228 said:

 

I classified as a C initially. Didn't really dry fire at all and got to B. Started to dry fire regularly 15 mins a day and went from B - M in about 1 year. Then I quit my job. During my 3 months of unemployment I ramped up dry fire and live fire very hard and ended up making the M-GM jump in about 4-5 total months. I was dry firing over 1 hour per day and live firing 3-4 days a week. I tapered off dry fire length as time went on. Once I made M I was also running my local club and designing stages for the surrounding area clubs as well. Truth be told... 3 years later I ended up burning out a bit and cancelled a bunch of majors planned last summer. Took a nice long break and now im back and ready to grind again. I never took classes from anyone. Maybe that could have sped this process up a bit? IDK. Ill be taking my first USPSA class with JJ in a few weeks. Hope to revamp my training from it as my current practice sessions can feel stale.

Thank you! Very helpful and insightful.

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23 hours ago, waktasz said:

I would say go as long as you can stay focused, but you can make great gains doing moderate training, 15-30 minutes a day 4-5 days a week.

Got it, makes sense. I suppose the way you worded your response kinda sums up the situation. If you think you can do it for x amount of extended time, go for it, but 15-30 minutes a day is really beneficial. Makes sense.

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The key is to not be distracted during it. No point pushing yourself to dry fire for an extended amount of time if your heart isn't in it.

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You know, I have won the annual Dry Fire Championships 3 TIMES just last month. I am so amazing. 

 

But really, I think dry fire is important, but too much dry fire can accomplish negative results, in that you start to believe that the gun has no recoil. It does and learning how to shoot with that component is CRITICAL. Great advise from Maximis in this thread. He achieved excellent results from live fire practice and supplemented his training with dry fire. 

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16 minutes ago, Nevadazielmeister said:

You know, I have won the annual Dry Fire Championships 3 TIMES just last month. I am so amazing. 

 

But really, I think dry fire is important, but too much dry fire can accomplish negative results, in that you start to believe that the gun has no recoil. It does and learning how to shoot with that component is CRITICAL. Great advise from Maximis in this thread. He achieved excellent results from live fire practice and supplemented his training with dry fire. 

 

Someone tell JJ that lol

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30 minutes ago, Maximis228 said:

 

Someone tell JJ that lol

 

Yeh, I slaughtered Simon with my wicked fast skills. He has no idea how good I am. He he he.

 

Stay thirsty friends.

Edited by Nevadazielmeister

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Shooting a Revo I know I am odd man out but it does somewhat limit me to shorter sessions, I can only pull that DA trigger so many times before fatigue sets in once the fatigue sets in it is hard to maintain proper form and timing. out side of that shooting a SA gun anything more than a short session and I start to loose focus so in addition to the general question of what is "BEST" the real question is what can YOU realistically do?

 

A training regime that burns you out or that you cant stay focused for is not going to help in the long run

 

  

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Wow, this thread makes me realize that I really need to step up my practice regiment!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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