Jump to content

What can I expect to gain from minimal investment?


chrisrdba
 Share

Recommended Posts

..... I know, minimal gains. 😜

 

Greetings. I've been considering diving in to this sport, but having second thoughts based on time constraints. My goals though really aren't to make GM ever -- honestly my goal is to simply learn to shoot fast and accurate under pressure. My guess is probably 99% of American gun owners are under equipped to deal with a life or death scenario with a pistol, and I don't want to be one of them. Due to kids and other hobbies I'm a few years out from being able to devote more time to this. 

 

I've had a bunch of classes but the cost is heavy. Several years ago I also did a bunch of run n gun outings with an M class shooter out in the desert (I'm near PHX), but all the desert near me is now off limits to shooting. So I'm certainly not new to shooting, but also not where I want to be.

 

All said I can dry fire a few times a week, and do one match every 3-4 weeks. I realize how little this is compared to most users on this board. Does anyone else only occasionally pop in like this, or is the sport completely dedicated by those that do it far more? Can I expect to gain anything from this based on what you've seen? I realize there's a ton of variables in there, so hoping to hear from someone else like me, or at least someone that's seen others like me. 

 

Thanks!

 

Edited by chrisrdba
Link to comment
Share on other sites

USPSA is a social hobby with some shooting. All your individual goals will always be your own and you get what you put in. 

 

No one else really cares but it's a great way to spend weekend days with like minded people. Just go out and have fun. Your goals will change, or they may not, either way it's ok.

 

My closest friends to date are people I met through USPSA. 

Edited by Rnlinebacker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IF you truly dry fire 4x a week, even if just for 5 minutes each time, and shoot one match a month you will at a minimum maintain whatever skill you have. If you can only devote a small amount of time, attention and energy to your gun skills, then at least make sure they are enough to keep the skill level you have rather than slowly slowly losing skill.

  • use a shot timer
  • dry fire regularly
  • live fire with a plan
  • video yourself and review it
  • compete
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I don't think the time you can devote is too out of the realm. I've only been averaging 1 match a month, and at most 1 practice session a week. I do dry fire anywhere between 5-15min about 3-4 nights a week. I think HOW you practice is far more important than how much you practice. 

 

Highly recommend having someone video you at your matches, especially if you're only going to one a month, and use those videos in your practice sessions to focus on your weak points. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, BigHand said:

I don't think the time you can devote is too out of the realm. I've only been averaging 1 match a month, and at most 1 practice session a week. I do dry fire anywhere between 5-15min about 3-4 nights a week. I think HOW you practice is far more important than how much you practice. 

 

Highly recommend having someone video you at your matches, especially if you're only going to one a month, and use those videos in your practice sessions to focus on your weak points. 

 

This is the truth

 

Efficient practice > Volume of practice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...