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HesedTech

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    Just can’t trust internet.

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  1. Here's what I don't get, some here are saying the targets are within 1 degree, yes you all said 1 degree of the 180. That's so close it would be hard to measure with proper survey equipment. But, if what you say is true during the walk through I would have first of all protested the stage and either had it fixed or if later in the match thrown out. Those numbers you are posting clearly violate the USPSA rule. And lest we forget the matches are put on for the competitors and not the MD or organizers. But I am betting the actual angles are a bit greater than 1 degree and then what experienced shooters do is ASK the RO where the 180 fault would be. I see this happen at all major matches and many local ones. The moral of the story is this, if a MD or organizer has purposely set up a "180" trap to potentially DQ competitors he/she is in violation of both the rules and the intent of USPSA competition and should be informed of such. Now if the course challenges a shooter in their movement with no attempt at trapping them into a DQ, well then it is the shooter's fault for disregarding the course in their planning and execution. Of course evil does reside in the hearts of some...
  2. Really? USPSA rules specifically mention such things. "But why do stages need to prevent 180 traps or block views of targets? The competitor should just know not to shoot them, right? Well, we have rule 2.1.4 that says: “Targets must be arranged so that shooting at them on an ‘as and when visible’ basis will not cause competitors to breach safe angles of fire.” https://nroi.org/nroi-tips/nroi-tips-the-180/#more-727 "2.1.4 Target Locations – When a course is constructed to include target locations other than immediately downrange, organizers and officials must protect or restrict surrounding areas to which competitors, officials or spectators have access. Each competitor must be allowed to solve the competitive problem in his own way and must not be hindered by being forced to act in any manner which might cause unsafe action. Targets must be arranged so that shooting at them on an “as and when visible” basis will not cause competitors to breach safe angles of fire."
  3. I've been at it now for a few years and I found Steve Anderson's advice (and one of our local GMs said the same thing to me) worked really well. "Don't think slow down to get your hits. Shoot what you see!" Slow is not "smooth" it's slow and the sport is about points per second. But, think fast and we begin to disregard the targets and drop points and that's as bad as slow and smooth with a bunch of As. If you think "speed" that's what you will get, so if you shoot what you see the "speed" works itself out. Close targets end up being fast (no double taps) and the further and more difficult ones get a whole lot more solid As and close Cs. My match rankings have substantially improved since I took their advice. One thing else Steve Anderson and others have told me, we have to be able to hit the targets which is why shooting faster than I can "see" the sights and the target means I'm just throwing "hopers" (I hope I hit something) at brown. Good luck and have fun!
  4. Here's my 2cents: I never had the 550, so I can't comment on the primer system faults or qualities. I did have a 650 and the two things (beside no swaging) I had the most problems with were the priming system and the indexing of the shell plate. Yes I had a "kaboom" which blew the whole primer magazine and left a dent in the ceiling from the follower rod. Good news is Dillon backs it up with their guarantee and sent a complete new system. I also found both Winchester and Federal primers are subject to accidental detonation in the press. What I see in the 750 is Dillon improving the two weaknesses in the 650 press and I'll bet it was done in response to the volume of warranty repairs and replacements they have encountered. After approximately 30K rounds through the 650 I sold it and purchased a 1050 and quite frankly wish I had done so from the start. But if your budget is a major factor I would get the 750 over the 650. Oh well we all have them, opinions. Enjoy whichever machine you purchase, it will serve you well for years to come.
  5. Check your crimp and the die to make sure it hasn’t changed. Recently I too after thousands of rounds started to have more failed cartridges and then I checked the crimp and it had changed slightly. Reset it and it fixed issue.
  6. Yondering, Too bad. Maybe we’ll run into each other someday in WA. at an area 1 match and you’ll find I meant everything I wrote to you and the only “move” I have is honest and straight up, no slime at all. And please quote me as it was written, and not imply or read anything else, it’s a bad habit for blog communication. Thank you anyway.
  7. Ok Mr. Yondering, being a technical oriented type of person I think you will see how far you've misrepresented this. Here's me first post on this thread and you might notice I included some of your ideas: "Hmm could have been a combo of the barrel and overcharge. The marks on your from the slide are huge compared to the others posted. You didn’t mention your reloading process, press and such. " And then this: "This^^^ I think you all are over analyzing/thinking this. I’ve seen unsupported cartridge discharge (I’m talking not even in a gun) and it by no means had this much damage. While the gun may not have been fully locked up the damage is far too great for anything other than an over charged cartridge. The gun springs should have nothing to do with it, assuming the barrel was fully locked up. CBC brass is as strong as any other, the cartridge was loaded with TG which could leave room for extra powder, and any reloading press can double charge if the operator makes a mistake. Good pictures though and they generated a lot of interesting comments." And again: "You’re killing it. I load a lot of CBC 9mm brass and am well aware of the taper and the associated bulging. I load 147s very successfully into CBC (thousands) but it does depend on the profile of the bullet and I load them for CZ and TF, which have some of the shortest loading requirements. Yes CBC is one of the hardest, least forgiving brass to load in 9 mm, but once a load is worked out with the appropriate bullet and powder combo it works fine." And you responded: I've underlined all the names and insults you have thrown at me and tried to do the same from my posts. In the end I believe you owe me an apology for the name calling. I am personally sorry you took the comments "over analyzing/thinking this' and "You're killing it" as insults, because they were never meant to be that. They meant exactly what I wrote; I feel, as do others who posted on this thread, you have far to complicated the issue, which returns me to my very first post; I believe it possibly was a combo of an overcharged cartridge and the barrel. The balls in your court.
  8. This ^^^^ I occasionally bump the sensor(s) and need to readjust them and it just takes seconds once you know how. Very easy.
  9. You have no idea what I understand, how many rounds I’ve loaded, or the problems and successes I’ve experienced, so please hold the insults back. When someone disagrees with you it’s best to not try and show or express your superior “knowledge” on an internet blog and this comment is uncalled for: Please back off and allow others to say you may be wrong and their experience may be different.
  10. They both work great. My favorite is the SCCD combined with the ejector. You will need to calibrate it to the case you are loading and then when those nasty 380 or 38 special cases show up (assuming your loading 9mm), thee ejector launches them into the bucket. I also love the pocket probe. Occasionally a ringer or sucked back primer happens and zing, off it goes to the bucket. In order of priority: SCCD and Pocket Probe should not be considered options, they really are a must have. Case ejector a highly need option.
  11. You’re killing it. I load a lot of CBC 9mm brass and am well aware of the taper and the associated bulging. I load 147s very successfully into CBC (thousands) but it does depend on the profile of the bullet and I load them for CZ and TF, which have some of the shortest loading requirements. Yes CBC is one of the hardest, least forgiving brass to load in 9 mm, but once a load is worked out with the appropriate bullet and powder combo it works fine. I’m not an expert with the model of gun in this thread, but I’m sure many, if not a lot, use recoil springs lighter than stock quite successfully in their pistols. Yes a fact, assuming the bullet is wedged at an angle or against something blocking it, but the pictures seem to indicate the cartridge was fairly well lined up in the chamber and there was no indication of a squib or blockage in the barrel. Oh well, opinions is what we all have and a blog thread is hardly a solid in depth place to analyze the problem with just a few pictures. It’s been interesting.
  12. Did you read the links I gave? As the next poster mentioned the Makarov die has to be used. Yes it makes one a bit nervous pressing a live round up through then die, but the bulge buster never touches the primer or primer pocket.
  13. This^^^ I think you all are over analyzing/thinking this. I’ve seen unsupported cartridge discharge (I’m talking not even in a gun) and it by no means had this much damage. While the gun may not have been fully locked up the damage is far too great for anything other than an over charged cartridge. The gun springs should have nothing to do with it, assuming the barrel was fully locked up. CBC brass is as strong as any other, the cartridge was loaded with TG which could leave room for extra powder, and any reloading press can double charge if the operator makes a mistake. Good pictures though and they generated a lot of interesting comments.
  14. Ok If your goal is top placement then find matches with new comers to USPSA, but if it’s the mental game that’s another issue. Fact 1: The top shooters could care less about how you shoot. Fact 2: The top shooters only care about how they shoot each stage and make up any errors. I believe most do not compare scores to judge how hard they should put the pedal down to beat the others. They know what their personal abilities are and shoot within those. Best advice: No one cares how you shoot, unless it’s unsafe. So analyze, strategize, memorize, and visualize each stage; then shoot what you see. The amazing part is your performance will become consistent and improve as your practice. Go to some major matches, that will give some experience shooting more than 4-6 stages typical of a local match. It will also help you be calmer/more mentally focused at the local ones. BTW, you asked a question that begs for these responses. Have fun shooting.
  15. If you plan on competition shooting in USPSA that means a lot of ammo, normally in just one caliber. (I load mostly 9mm and occasionally run some 40 & 45). Don’t stop at the 650/750 go directly to the 1100/1050, just the swage station alone is worth it. BTW, while loading can save money (don’t count on it), it is also a hobby in itself. You probably have noticed many posts here on BE about all the bullets, powder and accuracy, and that means there is an interest in experimentation. If competition shooting is what it’s all about then numbers is what’s important, crank out the ammo after finding the load which works then go and shoot, a lot!
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