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bigedp51

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    Ed Horton

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  1. The more a case is reloaded the harder the brass becomes and springs back more after sizing. The Lee under size die will size the case .002 to .003 smaller in diameter to compensate for brass spring back. And if using range pickup brass the Lee and EGW undersize dies are added insurance to prevent bullet setback. Below a 9mm cartridge resized with a Lee undersize die, the case is wasp waisted and showing the increased bullet grip.
  2. The more a case is reloaded the harder the brass becomes and it springs back more after resizing. The Lee and EGW undersize dies will size the case .002 to .003 smaller in diameter and reduce brass spring back and increase bullet grip. Below is a 9mm cartridge that was resized with a Lee undersize die and the case is wasp waisted. This will increase bullet grip on range pickup brass and prevent bullet setback. Below the new Redding pistol dies now have a Lyman type "M" expanders that will aid in straight inline seating and prevents the bullet from tipping during seating. The above message was brought to you by "Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Pistol Brass"
  3. Small pistol primers have a cup thickness of .017 to .020 and small rifle primers have a cup thickness of .020 to .025. Read the link below CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRIMER - A PRIMER ON PRIMERS http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php?topic=56422.0 Small Rifle StandardCCI 400 -thin .020" cup, not recommended for AR15 use by CCI/Speer. Good for .22 Hornet, .30 Carbine. See Note 1 at the bottom of the page NOTE 1: According to Speer/CCI Technical Services - Both the CCI 550 Small Pistol Magnum and CCI 400 Small Rifle primers are identical in size. Both primers use the same cup metal and share the same cup thickness. Both primers use the same primer compound formula and same amount of primer compound. They can be used interchangeably. Below you can see the small rifle primers with the thinner cup thickness.
  4. Best answer above! This man must be almost as smart, good looking and modest as I am.
  5. FYI, Remington ran Lake City from 1941 to 1982 and used their 7 1/2 primers in all the 5.56 ammunition. And the greatest chance of a slam fire in a AR15 type rifle is if a single round is loaded without the magazine in the rifle. When the rifle is feeding from the magazine the bolt velocity is slowed down and the free floating firing pin has less inertia. During the trials period both the M14 and M16 had the firing pins lightened to prevent slam fires. And any primer with a .025 cup thickness is all that is needed for safe operation of your AR15 rifle. Meaning millions of rounds were fired by the military in the M16 rifle with the Remington 7 1/2 primer without slam fire problems.
  6. Before anyone recommends the CCI 400 primers for the AR15 rifle read the link below. CHOOSING THE RIGHT PRIMER - A PRIMER ON PRIMERS http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php?topic=56422.0 Small Rifle Standard CCI 400 -thin .020" cup, not recommended for AR15 use by CCI/Speer. Good for .22 Hornet, .30 Carbine. See Note 1 at the bottom of the page CCI BR4 - match primer with a thicker .025" cup. Federal 205 - Mil-Spec cup thickness according to Federal - okay for 5.56mm. .0225" cup thickness. Federal 205M - same as the 205 but the match version. Magtech PR-SR - .025" cup thickness (not much feedback yet on this new primer as to AR15 suitability but with the same cup thickness as the Rem 7 1/2 it looks good so far) Remington 6 ½ - thin .020" cup, intended for older, lower pressure rounds Remington says do not use for the .223 Rem or other similar pressure rounds. Good for .22 Hornet, .30 Carbine. Remington 7 ½ BR - A match or "bench rest" primer. Lyman & Nosler classify this primer as a Standard. Remington says the compound is the same as the 6 1/2 but with a thicker .025" cup. RWS 4033 Winchester WSR - some piercing issues noted when changed from silver to brass cup. Cup thickness is a bit thinner at .021". Most say they are good to go for the AR15 despite that, probably because of the hardness of the cup. Some feel they are less resistant to higher pressures. Wolf/Tula Small Rifle SR #KVB-223 - soft, sensitive copper cup, not recommended for AR15/military rifle use or high pressure rounds. Small Rifle Magnum CCI 450 - same thicker .025" cup as the BR4 and #41. CCI #41 - commercial version of the fully-qualified DOD primer for use in U.S. military ammo. With this primer there is more 'distance' between the tip of the anvil and the bottom of the cup than with other CCI SR primers. .025" thick cup. Same primer mix as CCI 450. Remington 7 ½ BR - A match or "bench rest" primer. Hornady, Handloads.com, and Chuck Hawks classify this primer as a Magnum, differing from other sources that classify it as a Standard. .025" cup thickness. Wolf/Tula Small Rifle Magnum SRM - hard, less sensitive brass cup intended for AR15/military rifle and high pressure rounds - #KVВ-5,56M. Wolf/Tula Small Rifle 223 SR223 - #KVB-223M "This is the newest primer available in the Wolf line. It is ever so slightly hotter than the small rifle magnum primer and it comes with a brass colored thick cup. This primer can be used in place of the SRM primer or used when a different powder is used that is hard to ignite." NOTE 1: According to Speer/CCI Technical Services - Both the CCI 550 Small Pistol Magnum and CCI 400 Small Rifle primers are identical in size. Both primers use the same cup metal and share the same cup thickness. Both primers use the same primer compound formula and same amount of primer compound. They can be used interchangeably.
  7. The pattent for the Lyman type "M" expander expired and Redding pistol dies now have the type "M" expander. The expander is Titanium Nitride coated and slicker than snot on a door knob. Example below a .223 Lyman type "M" expander, normally with a jacketed bullet you just bump the case mouth onto the .226 section of the expander. This only opens the case mouth slightly larger than bullet diameter and also aids in straight inline seating.
  8. Cases that headspace on the case mouth have a light taper crimp for streamlined feeding. And how tightly the case grips the bullet holds it in place and keeps it from moving. The more the case is fired and reloaded the harder the brass gets and it springs back more after sizing. And the is why many shooters use a Lee undersize die with range pickup brass. These undersized dies size the case .002 to .003 smaller in diameter to compensate for thin cases and brass spring back. Meaning they will have more bullet grip and just use a taper crimp to slightly close up the case mouth for streamlined feeding. Below a 9mm cartridge that is wasp waisted and has a very good grip on the bullet and will not allow it to move during feeding or under recoil.
  9. The Lee undersize die will reduce the case diameter .002 to .003 more than a standard die and provide more bullet grip. On a 9mm a taper crimp is used to streamline the case mouth for feeding and not increase bullet grip. Below is a 9mm that was sized in a Lee undersize die to reduce brass spring back after sizing and expanding. As you can see the case is wasp waisted and has increased bullet grip. Below the Lyman type "M" expander does not over expand the case mouth and aids in straight inline seating. Below step "B" is just slightly larger than bullet diameter and the bullets can be seated into the case mouth by hand. Larger coated bullets may require to have the case mouth bumped onto step "C". Jacketed and plaited bullets only need to be bumped onto step "B".
  10. Wet tumbling will cause case mouth peening simply because the cases are hitting the case mouth. On rifles cases I trim and deburr after every wet tumbling. On my pistol cases I went to a sonic cleaner to solve the peening problem. If you insist on wet tumbling then "less is more" meaning less cases in the tumbler for less time. NOTE, I have a large RCBS media separator and even tumbling the cases in the media seperator can dent the case mouths. Below a .44 Special case that was wet tumbled for one hour. And when I expanded the cases I would have brass shavings inside the case and sticking to the expander. To solve this problem I bought a cheap $80.00 sonic cleaner that is a clone of the Lyman Turbo Sonic 2500 Ultrasonic Case Cleaner at Amazon. NOTE, if you use "HOT" tap water to fill the sonic cleaner it will get up to the proper temp faster and less work for the heating unit. Meaning using cold tap water my unit had to run through four cleaning cycles before the water came up to cleaning temp. (heater light goes off) Below Winchester .243 cases, the case on the left I fell asleep and the cases tumbled for over six hours. The case on the right is right out of the Winchester bag and shows the effect of factory tumbling.
  11. Wet tumbling with stainless steal media can cause case mouth peening and cause the brass shavings.
  12. If you had brass shavings inside the case then deburring or the expander is the problem. Your brass shavings appear to be just on the outside of the case. This would be the case mouth rubbing on the inside of the die body. Look at the inside of the die body and see if can see if the case is rubbing.
  13. I have never had a problem letting cases tumble overnight or longer in a vibratory tumbler with walnut media. But if wet tumbling with stainless steel media and tumbling too long you will get case mouth peening. Below on the left a .243 case wet tumbled overnight, it had been trimmed and deburred and the case mouth is now badly peened. The case on the right is right out of the factory bag and shows the effect of factory tumbling. Below a .44 Special case that was wet tumbled for less than one hour. And you can see the effects of the cases hitting the case mouth and the dents. After this I bought a sonic cleaner, no dust, no media stuck in the primer pockets and no case mouth peening.
  14. I use the Makarov FCD because I buy bulk once fired military brass and want to make the cases uniform in the base. The last bulk batch I got were all Winchester 9mm and basically all I accomplished was make the rims a uniform diameter. Meaning the rim diameter can be larger than the case diameter just above the extractor groove
  15. A resized case fired in a semi-auto should be .003 to .005 smaller in diameter than its fired diameter. This allows the case body to spring back from the chamber walls and extract reliably. Also the case shoulder should be bumped back .003 to .006, this allows the bolt to rotate freely because the rear of the case is not pushing on the bolt face. Try using a small base die that reduces the case body diameter more if your problem is not related to the amount of shoulder bump. Below examples of Forster .308/7.62 dies, and dies and chambers vary in size and Lake City cases are made of harder brass and can spring back more after sizing. And you can reduce the amount of brass spring back by pausing at the top of the ram stroke for 4 or 5 seconds using a standard die. I buy once fired Lake City 5.56 and 7.62 brass and size them with a small base die to return the cases to SAAMI minimum dimensions for the first firing in my chamber.
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