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very sluggish reset in a 2011


cpa5oh

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I have a Cheely 2011. Trigger pull was just north of 3 lbs. I wanted to get it to around 2 (which is where my other competition guns - a CZ Shadow and CZ Tactical Sport - are.)

Read an article about how to get a "2 1/2 pound trigger pull" in a 1911 - the author said the only thing he uses to set trigger pull weight is the sear spring.

So I played with the sear spring and ended up with a 2 lb trigger pull.

Problem is that that reset is super light - as in, if I don't take my finger completely off the trigger, the trigger doesn't let out.

With my CZ's once the trigger breaks I can reduce pressure on the trigger and the force of the trigger resetting moves it back out. With this 2011, now, I have to take all pressure off the trigger.

Is this normal? Or should I have went about lightening the trigger in a different way?

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I'd try over with a fresh sear spring. You may want to try a Clarks 4 leaf spring. I prefer the Dawson springs for 2011s.

The sear spring is what returns the trigger to its forward and firing position. You are correct in assuming that the primary means of adjusting pull weight is the sear spring, but if you take too much out of it you may not like the reset. I've had mine down to just under a pound and a half, but I prefer more positive reset so I'm up around 2.

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There is actually a separate leaf of the sear spring that returns the trigger to its forward position, as well as resets the disconnetor. It's the center leaf. You may be able to adjust the bend on it enough to give you the return you want without compromising the lightened trigger pull weight. It's a delicate balance.

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I haven't felt a sub 2 lb trigger with a really positive reset from any smith...

Or on any pistol for that matter, including CZs, Tanfos, Glocks, etc. Its a lot to ask for something to be easy to pull back and simultaneously have good positive forward pressure. To get a more positive reset at a given weight you would either have to split the middle leaf a la Clark, and reduce pressure on disconnector while increasing forward pressure on the trigger bow. Alternately you could reduce pressure on sear leg and increase the bow leg, but it is easy to take safe engagement surfaces and make a trigger unsafe

When I started playing with 1911 triggers I spent $20 for a stack of springs and hours until I understood how each leaf interacts and adjusted it to my satisfaction.

If you are going to DIY its not rocket science but get some spare parts, take your time, and do all safety checks. If you are going to send to a smith, try a trigger job from that smith first and make sure it meets your expectations. I had to relearn trigger control going from a Glock to 1911.

People with hingey trigger guns tend to cheat when reporting pull weights. A 2 lb CZ, measured at the bottom of the shoe, might be 5 lbs where you put your finger, and with the little spring that likes to break work exerting a proportionate amount of force. When I try to take advantage of the slide in frame, low bore axis design I wind up with a very heavy pull due to my finger pad contacting near the top of the shoe, and pretty positive reset. A 2011 trigger travels in the direction you want to pull, straight to the rear, and that will be consistent wherever you place your finger, so the reset force will also be consistent.

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I'd try over with a fresh sear spring. You may want to try a Clarks 4 leaf spring. I prefer the Dawson springs for 2011s.

The sear spring is what returns the trigger to its forward and firing position. You are correct in assuming that the primary means of adjusting pull weight is the sear spring, but if you take too much out of it you may not like the reset. I've had mine down to just under a pound and a half, but I prefer more positive reset so I'm up around 2.

+1 on the Clark's 4-leaf spring! It splits the center leaf on a regular sear spring, allowing you to get the reset different from the disconnector part of the spring. The left side handles the sear itself, so they are pretty much independent, but less pressure on the sear will result in less on the trigger reset as well. Bend and try, bend and retry again until you get it where you want it.

Alan~^~

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The Left Leg is the Sear spring tension. The Middle Leg is the trigger take up/reset tension. If you want more reset tension to "Push your finger back" you have to increase the middle leg spring tension. The overall feel of the 1911/2011 trigger pretravel, break, over travel, and reset can be finely tuned to produce whatever "feel" or "weight" you want within reason. Producing a safe and functioning trigger job that is reliable over many thousands of rounds requires a lot more than "bending springs around". If you are not willing to figure it out on your own all the while battling through the trial & error mistakes that cause malfunctions, or worse an unsafe trigger setup, then leave it to a competent gunsmith to do it for you.

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The Left Leg is the Sear spring tension. The Middle Leg is the trigger take up/reset tension. If you want more reset tension to "Push your finger back" you have to increase the middle leg spring tension. The overall feel of the 1911/2011 trigger pretravel, break, over travel, and reset can be finely tuned to produce whatever "feel" or "weight" you want within reason. Producing a safe and functioning trigger job that is reliable over many thousands of rounds requires a lot more than "bending springs around". If you are not willing to figure it out on your own all the while battling through the trial & error mistakes that cause malfunctions, or worse an unsafe trigger setup, then leave it to a competent gunsmith to do it for you.

This is good advice. I have a box of hammer and sears from learning how to get a reliable 18 ounce trigger. Edited to add that I no longer shoot that light of a trigger. If everything is polished and set right 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 is good enough for me.
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Shot the gun/showed it to others/compared it to others last night - everyone thought it was normal. Probably is. I guess I shouldn't expect the positive reset I'm used to with a Glock or CZ. The hammer did follow the slide forward a few times when I racked it hard - did not while I was shooting it at all though through 300 rounds. I'll have it checked out by someone that knows more than me.

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Been evaluating the same with my SA 1911. Found the trigger had to be glassy smooth to reset properly. It involved hours of mainspring evaluation and polishing the sides of the shoe. Finally located a burr in the frame (the culprit) that was preventing me from reaching my goal. Much better now.

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