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9mm OAL in M&P


okorpheus

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I just received some 147 grain black bullets and while setting up my press I had to get down to 1.098 before the cartridge would drop all the way in and fall out freely. Is this normal? Seems very short to me, but I'm fairly new to reloading. Should I worry about compressing a load at this length (using WSF).

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Uh I would think so, I run 147gr Bear Creeks at....

post-2547-142948009404_thumb.jpg

And they seat like this...

post-2547-142948014032_thumb.jpg

Just a few spares I have floating around that were replaced with KKM's.

Have you checked everything else, crimp, resize etc....

Anyway, good luck and if you need a replacement 5" pro barrel, well I know a guy;)

Doug

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Not a pro. They pass a case gage at 1.14 which is where I really planned on starting, but those don't quite go all the way in and have to be shaken a bit to come out. The 1.14 will pass case gage and will go into battery and eject when I load from a mag and rack the slide to eject, but don't pass the "plunk" test with the barrel out of the gun.

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1.14 will pass case gage and will go into battery and eject when I load from a mag and rack the slide to eject, but don't pass the "plunk" test.

Reality (working perfectly) is much more important than a test to

see if they will work. :cheers:

If they work perfectly, you might modify how you conduct or interpret

the "Plunk" Test.

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Likely has to do with the length of the actual projectile, or more specifically, the length of the sub-caliber portion of the front of the projectile. I believe this would be the ogive...?

There is only so much room at the front of the chamber in the throat area where there is room for the full diameter of the bullet before it gets into the lands of the bore. Could be that as you load this particular bullet a little longer, you start pushing the full diameter into the throat and that is where you are getting that stickiness on the plunk test. One thing to watch out for on something like this is accidently pulling a bullet out of a loaded round when ejecting a live round from the chamber.

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My factory one dot barrel is also very short throated/leade. That's the more current 10:1 twist barrels

My 1911 9mm loads would not fit

A Wilson barrel was also short, but the KKM would take all my loads

If you have eliminated crimp, other case problems and your loads cleanly passes your case gauge then it is you leade

Search the forum, this problem has been discussed before http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=201379&hl=

Do not shoot rounds hard into the lands.

Some guns like CZ are notorious for short leade. They claim it adds to their accuracy.

BTW Doug, are all your loads shown in your picture below headspace or am I reading the picture wrong?

Thought rounds should be more flush to end of barrel hood?

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It's not that expensive to get the barrel throated if you live near a gunsmith with a 9mm throating reamer. If you have a lot of barrels to do just buy one.

If you have a lot of guns - or barrels - of one caliber it's easier to have all of them accept the same loading of the cartridge so you can set up your press once and not have to keep messing with it to change seating depths.

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Only have the one gun so loading that short isn't inconvenient, just wanted the opinions of some more experienced as to wether or not it's dangerously short. The OAL discrepancy between the Lyman manual and Hogdons site make me unsure.

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