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XDm Trigger Job Comparison


John Tuley
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I recently bought an XDm .40 for carry. From my research here, it seems like Canyon Creek, Springer Precision and Powder River Precision all have excellent reputations and loyal followings, and I'm 100% convinced that all three do great work.

So I'm not asking which is "best." I'd like to see if anyone can describe the differences between them (or two of them, if you haven't come across all three). Pretravel, overtravel, crispness of the break, crispness of the reset -- things like that. Then I'll try to decide which is closest to my ideal trigger. Weight's going to be 3.5-4 pounds, since it's a carry gun, so that's not a factor.

I'd love, of course, to shoot all of them, but that's probably not feasible (since it requires finding them, shooting side-by-side, etc.). If it happens to work out, I'll be happy and will do that.

Thanks in advance for everyone's input!

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I think you can get a trigger you will be really happy with from a Powder River Precision drop in kit. Easy to install. I am going to guess 4 lbs pull and a super short reset. My other XDm has a Springer Precision competition trigger job. 2.5 lbs, super nice. But not for a carry gun!

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Super happy with my PRP drop in living in a 5.25 in 40S&W using the blue competition springs.

Cuts the takeup and rest by 50%+ and virtually no creep as you press the shot.

I'm at around 3,000 rounds of USPSA, Steel Challenge, and Multi-Gun with it, and I started to have light strikes. Replaced recoil spring (Wolff 14) at Daniel's (PRP) suggestion but no love, had to get a new striker spring from PRP for $7. Also am using their polished striker which is probably lighter weight - the issue may not have happened with a stock striker <dunno>.

LOVE the PRP drop in. Look at their animated image that shows how their kit with the striker safety works as opposed to the other guys. Made my decision easy. Plus you can call and talk to him if necessary. That makes it a total no brainer to me. I don't need support often but being able to cut to the chase with the guy putting it out is totally awesome.

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I've installed both PRP and Springer kits in a variety of XDMs I've owned. My last three XDMs have all had trigger jobs from Rich. Very minimal takeup, smooth crisp break, minimal reset. To be fair, I've heard that both PRP and Springer do awesome jobs with there own kits, But I've never had that done. Everyone that has tried one of my CC guns has been very impressed. Rich uses a spring kit and reworks the stock components to get great results. As I said, I can't compare his work to custom work from the others, but I had him remove a Springer kit I installed from my XDM 45 and do his. There was a noticable improvement. His prices are fair and being fairly close to me, it doesn't cost me a ton to get a pistol to him. He also does awesome 1911 triggers as I have a couple of those also. I truly believe the best way to have a trigger job done is let a pro do it.

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in addition to the three excelent companies you mentioned already, don't forget that the Springfield Armory Custom Shop is also a viable option to perform great trigger jobs:

They offer trigger jobs on the XD/XDm for both competition and carry.

Good Luck And Be Safe!!!

:D

Thanks, I didn't think about Springfield.

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I've installed both PRP and Springer kits in a variety of XDMs I've owned. My last three XDMs have all had trigger jobs from Rich. Very minimal takeup, smooth crisp break, minimal reset. To be fair, I've heard that both PRP and Springer do awesome jobs with there own kits, But I've never had that done. Everyone that has tried one of my CC guns has been very impressed. Rich uses a spring kit and reworks the stock components to get great results. As I said, I can't compare his work to custom work from the others, but I had him remove a Springer kit I installed from my XDM 45 and do his. There was a noticable improvement. His prices are fair and being fairly close to me, it doesn't cost me a ton to get a pistol to him. He also does awesome 1911 triggers as I have a couple of those also. I truly believe the best way to have a trigger job done is let a pro do it.

CC's work was an improvement in what way? Was the trigger smoother? Shorter? Lighter? I don't doubt you that it was better than the kit.

As much as I've seen in this thread in favor of the PRP kit, I think I want to have a pro do the work for two reasons: first, he'll do a better job than I will, even if it's just installing/fitting the kit (which I doubt). Second, this is for a carry gun, so it has to work. I have some mechanical sympathy, but not enough to feel like I can guarantee that level of reliability.

Thanks for your input; it's definitely helpful!

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Rich at Canyon Creek has the best trigger job on a XD/XDM ever. And I've tried them all.

Agreed,

HOWEVER, I must say if it is used for your carry gun, I would not make any modifications to it AT ALL except night sights.

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I have a Springer Precision in my XDm and a PRP in my XD. The PRP was shorter and a little more crisp than the Springer, but I very much liked both of them.

Both are competition trigger kits at 2.5lbs though.

Good luck!

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I have 5 XD’s and one XDM. I have done competition and carry trigger jobs on around 2 dozen XD’s. All 5 of my XD’s have Springer Precision parts. I installed my first PRP trigger in my XDM, so my experience may not be typical.

First and foremost, I don’t think you can go wrong with either kit. From my experience, the Springer Precision requires the most time and diligence to install. Both of my carry guns (compact 40 S&W, sub-compact 40 S&W) have Springer triggers set at 4 pounds. They are both extremely reliable.

I find the Springer kit gives me far more control on the amount of take up and over travel compared to the PRP. The tradeoff here is that I spend 2 ½ to 3 hours doing a trigger job with Springer parts. I put the PRP kit in my XDM in about 75 minutes.

My preference for Springer has to do with the basic design of the XD sear components, springs and pins. I heavily modify the stock XD striker safety lever to prevent the floating pin from moving under heavy usage. This is not possible with the PRP kit do to the design of the replacement safety lever.

I like the PRP design for the XDM. My XDM is a competition pistol, and the PRP kit lends itself to this type of weapon very easily. It is, in my opinion, easier to produce an extremely light, reliable trigger with the PRP kit than with the SP parts. This is not a shortcoming of the SP kit by any means. It is a matter of geometry and the inherent stacking tolerances in the XD/XDM itself which can sometimes restrict how far you can push the lightness of the trigger. While I have done sub 3 pound triggers on some XDs, I find that some guns can be problematic in this respect if you are looking for a very light trigger. There is a point where the trigger will stop resetting reliably if you are not careful.

This is especially evident in a 45 ACP XD, which I have found to be a far different creature than a 9 or 40. The 45 has slight dimensional differences that makes working with it more of a challenge.

To keep my 45 absolutely reliable, I cannot set the trigger pull below 4.5 pounds – however it is a very short and crisp trigger.

The XDM, with its extra hardware, presents its own challenges when working with it. I found the PRP kit to be well engineered for use in an XDM due to the extra moving parts.

I will probably continue using Springer Precision kits for carry guns, and PRP for competition pistols.

One item I found to be extremely annoying about the PRP kit is the trigger itself. Mine had extremely sharp edges that required quite a bit of work to eliminate the cheese grater effect between the trigger and the trigger safety. Before I smoothed out the trigger, my first 200 rounds through the pistol turned my trigger finger into hamburger meat.

I appreciate the extra material provided on the PRP sear. It provides the ability to properly fit the sear to the safety and ejector to minimize side play on the parts.

I think both kits would benefit from having a wider range of springs provided. I generally either have these on hand – or I make my own when required.

One last note – if you invest in either kit, purchase the titanium striker safety kit – it will reduce trigger pull by a half pound alone.

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