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Accuracy


EricW

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Now that I'm actually going to the range for practice <gasp!> an entire once a week or more, I'm learning that I won't tolerate anything less than outstanding accuracy out of my gun and loads. Yes, I do realize that IPSC targets are big, but I now think people minimize the need for accuracy when evaluating the sport. If hit the trigger at the edge of a plate or on a distant upper A/B. I *need* to know that my bullet is actually going to go *there* and not somewhere else. Without that confidence, I can't call my shots.

I'm not sure where to draw the line between time/effort/performance, but I know I've certainly upgraded my requirements on what I feel I *need* to play the game.

Thoughts...?

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BE would agree with you, I think.

I give a different perspective as a discussion point in a couple of old threads...(I was thinking of digging them up recently).

Regardless, I do believe that calling the shot is just reading the relative position of the gun as the bullet leaves the barrel. That can be done with a gun/shooter that can shoot 6in groups just as well as a gun/shooter that can manage 1in groups. But, you are right...that ability to get the tight precision/accuracy is a sure path to gaining the needed confidence.

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Fix up your big brown ipsc targets and paint them with black and white. Shoot partials and no-shoot covered targets 90% of the time and you will find focus improves (or can).

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  • 2 weeks later...

All the tops guys I knew were obsessed with accuracy. You might not think that, watching them crank through a stage; but you can bet their pistol was dialed in.

Having a pistol that shoots well, and knowing its exact point of impact - at every distance - is paramount. That serves to remove variables. Which, the more and more you compete, is what its all about.

A good way to understand calling - it has nothing to do with where you wanted the bullet to go.

It has everything to do with knowing precisely where the bullet went (before it hit the target).

But that's not to say that you don't want to hit the A box. Of course you do; that's a given. Because you've carefully studied and defined "what the actual target is," for each target in the stage, before you shot the stage. So that's done - you can forget about it. Now that you're actually shooting... you're reading the gun - looking for the answer to the question: Did that shot hit the target?

be

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