Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Tips welcome


djcantr
 Share

Recommended Posts

This was my sixth USPSA match. I was shooting a G35 but picked up a CZ Tactical Sport yesterday and the trigger is lighter and shorter than I'm used to. You'll see the surprise shot in the third stage of the video. Seven stages today but I only got three on video.

First stage was probably my best mix of speed and accuracy. I made makeup shots on two targets I didn't need to. I need to work on calling my shots.

Second stage was where you had to engage the three different types of targets each from a different box. Had a few misses on the plates/poppers.

Third stage I just tried to run too fast for my skills. The third target I shot at was higher than the middle target and I missed it. Really, at three yards I missed it. I was already thinking about the next targets and failed to dip back down to raise the POA through the port and missed. The next shot was a surprise shot as I went beyond taking up the slack as I was used to shooting my G35.

Critique me. I know I need to work on my splits and calling my shots. What other specific things do I need to work on to improve?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For calling shots, just shoot and watch your front sight. Shoot into the berm at nothing. Focus on what the front sight is doing. Is it going straight up them straight back into the rear notch? Im sure others will have things to add. But when you call your shots for me it was like someone turned on a switch. Cool stuff.

How are your hits? You looked quick, almost out of control, almost but not.

If that's your sixth match, you are doing well. There is alot to learn. Dryfire & Good shooting!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1st stage. Get the non shooting stuff done quicker, i.e. non-shooting movement and your reload. On the last array, it looks to me like you could have set up a little more to the right and backed out a bit from the barriers and shot that whole thing in one place instead of doing the little steps that you did. Nailing the reload quickly on your first step would help this.

Your draw needs more work, on the second stage, you missed your weak hand grip. You will be able to take care of this in DF.

One trick is to holster your pistol after "make ready" and leave your hand on the grip, having a full and perfect grip, just like you would do if you were doing the worlds most perfect draw. At the same time put your weak hand where it meets up with your pistol before you push out. For me it is toward the gun, just off my mid-line, touching my belly. Basically, do the reverse of a draw after "make ready".

On the second stage the RO kinda hosed you on the start, asking you all of that. You don't need that in your head, especially the long time just standing there without marking your pistol with your strong hand. If that happens again, where he says something, just put your hand on your grip again and reset yourself. On the 3rd stage, your hands were dangling there for quite awhile before you got the commands.

I leave my hand on the grip for a little while, letting my body know what a perfect draw feels like, then I assume the starting position. Time enough where the RO is usually waiting on me, wondering if I am going to assume the position or not and wants to "get things going". He will give you the "are you ready" pretty quick after that. I try to stay away from just posing there forever waiting for the RO to do his thing. You were waiting there for quite a bit at one point, with your hand off your gun for a long time. It is like standing at the plate holding the bat up forever while the pitcher goes through the signs, waves them off, goes through some more signs, checks the runner, etc., etc., all the while you are there holding the bat up in the air. Sometimes you need to control the situation a little bit, instead of calling a time out, you are just kinda taking over the timing, making sure the RO starts you promptly, as soon as possible after you assume the position.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For calling shots, just shoot and watch your front sight. Shoot into the berm at nothing. Focus on what the front sight is doing. Is it going straight up them straight back into the rear notch? Im sure others will have things to add. But when you call your shots for me it was like someone turned on a switch. Cool stuff.

How are your hits? You looked quick, almost out of control, almost but not.

If that's your sixth match, you are doing well. There is alot to learn. Dryfire & Good shooting!!

Thanks for the tip on calling shots. I'll try it. I also think once I can really nail a consistent grip then the pistol will recoil consistently and I'll be able to call them better. My grip sucks now so each time I grip it, it recoils differently. I might change out the front sight to a fiber optic to help me see the front sight and track it better as well.

My hits were ok in those stages, except for that stage I ran 9 seconds through the ports. I had just made up my mind I was going to push myself fast and I went too far. Below are the stats for the stages on video, in order of appearance in the video:

Class Division Points Penalties Time Hit Factor Stage Pts Stage %

U Limited 99 0 14.62 6.7715 74.8247 68.02%

U Limited 58 0 17.63 3.2898 51.3550 85.59%

U Limited 67 20 9.20 5.1087 43.0029 43.00%

First stage had 110 possible points. Second stage 60 possible points. Third stage 100 possible points. Can't believe I shot 85% on the second stage. I felt so slow. The third stage really killed me. I think if I would have ran it in 11 seconds I could have shot around 95 points and done much, much better. Lesson learned.

Thank you for the input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1st stage. Get the non shooting stuff done quicker, i.e. non-shooting movement and your reload. On the last array, it looks to me like you could have set up a little more to the right and backed out a bit from the barriers and shot that whole thing in one place instead of doing the little steps that you did. Nailing the reload quickly on your first step would help this.

Your draw needs more work, on the second stage, you missed your weak hand grip. You will be able to take care of this in DF.

One trick is to holster your pistol after "make ready" and leave your hand on the grip, having a full and perfect grip, just like you would do if you were doing the worlds most perfect draw. At the same time put your weak hand where it meets up with your pistol before you push out. For me it is toward the gun, just off my mid-line, touching my belly. Basically, do the reverse of a draw after "make ready".

On the second stage the RO kinda hosed you on the start, asking you all of that. You don't need that in your head, especially the long time just standing there without marking your pistol with your strong hand. If that happens again, where he says something, just put your hand on your grip again and reset yourself. On the 3rd stage, your hands were dangling there for quite awhile before you got the commands.

I leave my hand on the grip for a little while, letting my body know what a perfect draw feels like, then I assume the starting position. Time enough where the RO is usually waiting on me, wondering if I am going to assume the position or not and wants to "get things going". He will give you the "are you ready" pretty quick after that. I try to stay away from just posing there forever waiting for the RO to do his thing. You were waiting there for quite a bit at one point, with your hand off your gun for a long time. It is like standing at the plate holding the bat up forever while the pitcher goes through the signs, waves them off, goes through some more signs, checks the runner, etc., etc., all the while you are there holding the bat up in the air. Sometimes you need to control the situation a little bit, instead of calling a time out, you are just kinda taking over the timing, making sure the RO starts you promptly, as soon as possible after you assume the position.

The reload you pointed out could have been a lot better. I might make up some dummy rounds with no charge or primer to load in mags to make the weight realistic and practice my reloads in my living room. You're right that I could have not gone as forward in the last array in that stage and not had to back up for that last target. I was a little over zealous in moving up there quickly and went too far. Didn't realize that mistake until you pointed it out.

Working on my draw is a good point. I just got this pistol on Friday and was working on drawing Friday night. I watch a Bob Vogel video linked to in another thread here and saw where he brings his weak hand up and puts his index finger under the trigger guard and then rolls that hand into place. I practiced that a bit. In the second stage I wasn't thinking to try to do that, but that's what I think I did and was very, very slow at it and didn't roll the hand much. I'll be working on my draw a lot. Might get a lot of living room holster wear on this pistol pretty quick.

Your tip for doing a reverse draw of sorts after making ready is a good one. I'll try that and keep my hand on my pistol longer as you suggested. The RO certainly wasn't trying to throw me off there. He's a real nice guy. Looking back, though, it did get in my mind. After he asked me if I was shooting production my mind instantly started thinking about how I couldn't possibly be shooting production with a SAO pistol and mags loaded to 20 rounds. It distracted me from thinking about the stage.

Thanks for the awesome tips, guys! Great stuff for me to work on. I really appreciate it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He didn't intend to hose you but he did. That is where you have to take it back and get things right in your head. "resetting" by taking a grip and clearing things in your head will help.

Make sure that you are practicing correctly. Get Steve Anderson's first book and Seeklanders video's. There is not much worse then practicing incorrectly.

Your tip for doing a reverse draw of sorts after making ready is a good one. I'll try that and keep my hand on my pistol longer as you suggested. The RO certainly wasn't trying to throw me off there. He's a real nice guy. Looking back, though, it did get in my mind. After he asked me if I was shooting production my mind instantly started thinking about how I couldn't possibly be shooting production with a SAO pistol and mags loaded to 20 rounds. It distracted me from thinking about the stage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When u make up some dummy rounds, mark them in a way that you will never mistake them. And always keep them separate from any other ammmo. I'm sure you do this. It's in case someone reads this. Lol

Calling shots, if you have a place you can shoot. Set up a small 6 to 8 round stage. Nothing crazy. just where you have to move to ingage each target. Then shoot it. ULASC, then think of where your sights were when the shots broke on each target and see if you can recall your shots. The more specific you can recall your shots the better the shot calling. I do this once in a while when I get sloppy. I should do it everyday? Lol. Good shooting!

Edited by a matt
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He didn't intend to hose you but he did. That is where you have to take it back and get things right in your head. "resetting" by taking a grip and clearing things in your head will help.

Make sure that you are practicing correctly. Get Steve Anderson's first book and Seeklanders video's. There is not much worse then practicing incorrectly.

Your tip for doing a reverse draw of sorts after making ready is a good one. I'll try that and keep my hand on my pistol longer as you suggested. The RO certainly wasn't trying to throw me off there. He's a real nice guy. Looking back, though, it did get in my mind. After he asked me if I was shooting production my mind instantly started thinking about how I couldn't possibly be shooting production with a SAO pistol and mags loaded to 20 rounds. It distracted me from thinking about the stage.

I ordered Steve Anderson's books last week due to recommendations I kept reading here. Should be here this week and then I'll get busy reading. I'll have to check out Seeklander's videos. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When u make up some dummy rounds, mark them in a way that you will never mistake them. And always keep them separate from any other ammmo. I'm sure you do this. It's in case someone reads this. Lol

Calling shots, if you have a place you can shoot. Set up a small 6 to 8 round stage. Nothing crazy. just where you have to move to ingage each target. Then shoot it. ULASC, then think of where your sights were when the shots broke on each target and see if you can recall your shots. The more specific you can recall your shots the better the shot calling. I do this once in a while when I get sloppy. I should do it everyday? Lol. Good shooting!

Good point on the dummy rounds. Any time I'm using dummy rounds (previously has just been shotgun) I make sure there is no other ammunition in the room. I'm sure someone, somewhere has had an AD in their living room when they were practicing with dummy rounds and a live round got mixed in.

I'll try your tips on shot calling. I've made up some portable PVC target stands. Closest range is an hour away but my gf's mom has a small amount of land I can setup temporary targets on and shoot. I need to order some cardboard targets and then I'll be set. I honestly think I need to work on my draw and get it nailed down before I practice much more on live fire. Don't want to drill any more bad habits into my head.

I shot Steel Challenge today. Scores aren't up yet but I think I did fairly well. I'm honestly not sure how I hit half of the plates. I just followed the front sight until I got up on the plate and squeezed the trigger. Thought for sure I was running too fast to hit most of them but kept hearing the steel ring so I kept pressing on. Once I figured out that I needed to ignore the sights on the large plates on the Smoke and Hope stage and just point and shoot I squeezed out a 3.4x string and a 3.20 string with my CZ TS and major PF .40 S&W. Felt pretty good about the improvement and some good trigger time.

What about my movement in the video? When I don't have to plant my feet I like to keep moving but I'm not really conscious about exactly what my feet are doing. Is that something I should work on refining later once I get the basics down?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Have you taken a competition shooting class from anyone yet? If not, that will be the best bang for your buck.

Not yet. I'm going to try to take one this summer if I can get the time off.

Attending a training class from a Master or Grand Master level shooter will be well worth the money and time. It will also greatly reduce the time it takes to "Fix" what you are doing wrong. We can give you comments on what we see in your videos, but that will never be a replacement for good in person training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, a class would be a good idea if you can swing it.

I think that the problem that you might have is that you are pretty fast right now but you have lots of fundamental stuff that needs to be figured out and worked on and that is going to take some time. The problem comes when you need to be able to slow down and do it right instead of doing it wrong, fast. Your self esteem isn't going to allow you to turn down the speed dial, it just isn't you to do that and the results will be humbling and frustrating, at first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just followed the front sight until I got up on the plate and squeezed the trigger. Thought for sure I was running too fast to hit most of them but kept hearing the steel ring so I kept pressing on. Once I figured out that I needed to ignore the sights on the large plates on the Smoke and Hope stage and just point and shoot...
You just said a bunch about where you are at in your learning curve with the development of your visual skills, and maybe even a little peek into your temperament. The videos indicate you need some work on transitions, economy of motion, etc. I know this might not be particularly useful, but I am with CHA-LEE in this regard. It's time for a bit of in person help. Are there any accomplished shooter's locally that could provide a little coaching and mentoring?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just followed the front sight until I got up on the plate and squeezed the trigger. Thought for sure I was running too fast to hit most of them but kept hearing the steel ring so I kept pressing on. Once I figured out that I needed to ignore the sights on the large plates on the Smoke and Hope stage and just point and shoot...
You just said a bunch about where you are at in your learning curve with the development of your visual skills, and maybe even a little peek into your temperament. The videos indicate you need some work on transitions, economy of motion, etc. I know this might not be particularly useful, but I am with CHA-LEE in this regard. It's time for a bit of in person help. Are there any accomplished shooter's locally that could provide a little coaching and mentoring?

Thanks Ron and old506.

I live in Oklahoma and there are quite a few accomplished shooters here. It's a really good area for shooting sports. I've looked at classes offered by TDSA in Tulsa. I've read good things about their classes. Unfortunately it looks like I will have to work for all of the scheduled pistol classes this year unless my schedule changes. They just have combat pistol classes scheduled, no competition classes, but I'm sure I'd learn a great deal from the combat class. Private instruction is available but pretty costly at $1,000 for a full day. I'll try reaching out to a couple accomplished shooters in the area to see if any of them might be willing to help me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is expensive but I would be all over that private instruction. I think it would be far better to pay a grand for a day v. $400 to be in a class of 8-12. You are fortunate to not have to fly, take advantage of it if you can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you go to your local USPSA matches ask around for shooters who also do training. There should be a few local accomplished shooters who offer training/coaching at a reasonable price. $1000 for a one on one single day of training is very expensive. If they are not providing ammo, food, and transportation then that price is very high. You should be able to find a local USPSA shooter that would be able to do one on one training for a lot less money.

Just keep in mind, that training is just as important as practice, guns, gear, and ammo. You need to invest in effective training on a regular basis to keep moving your skill set forward.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...