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Thinking about shooting Revo in IDPA


JesseM
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I'm running low on 9mm but found a decent deal on 38 special so I'm thinking about shooting my S&W 686 at IDPA matches. The 686 I have I noticed that after shooting about 150-200 rounds for 38 special the cylinders get a bit.. I'm not sure what the word is but I'm going to use the term sticky. As in the rounds can be a bit difficult to insert. Is this normal or is something off?

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Yeah - if the ammo runs dirty, chambers can get dirty/sticky pretty quickly, leading to botched reloads. Lead bullets, especially over powders like W231 & bullseye can foul pretty quickly. WWB is pretty dirty, too. Keeping the chambers clean, and shooting plated/jacketed bullets over Clays or Solo1000 can stave off the crud a bit.

Tom

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Thanks for the info the stuff I was shooting at the time was WWB I think. The ammo i have now is Speer Lawman 158gr TMJ so hopefully it will run a little cleaner.

So I'm going to have to basically clean those cylinders after every match? That's disappointing. Is there any good method to clean them easily? I'm sort of new to this whole revolver thing.

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Stainless brushes are great for getting heavy fouling out, but IMO, they're pretty aggressive for regular use. If you stay on top of it by giving the chambers a quick cleaning with a good solvent after range sessions, standard brushes & patches ought to be fine. Chamfering the chamber mouths and running clean ammo helps, too.

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I've not shot anything Speer, so I can't comment. If you're running into the issue after 150-200 rounds, and you're using factory ammo, I'd keep using WWB if that's what's available. The round count at local matches is well below 150-200, but if you do suspect your chambers are getting sticky, or you're shooting a larger sanctioned match, ask the SO if you can give your chambers a quick cleaning about halfway through the match. Once your squad finishes up, they'll likely go with you to the berm for safety reasons.

Hoppes ought to be ok. Everyone's got their favorite solvent, it seems. I use Kroil and Ed's Red. Kroil works very well, but I have to buy it over the internet. Ed's Red is homebrew (read: cheap & plentious), but it works well, too.

Something I do as a final step (don't know if anyone else does it) is run an ethanol-soaked patch through the chambers. The ethanol removes residual solvent which can otherwise act as a crud magnet. Dry surfaces just seem to stay cleaner longer.

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I started running my S&W 66 for IDPA over the summer and love using a revolver for IDPA. It adds a degree of challenge and changes your thinking completely. What was a simple point A to point B to point C stage with an auto takes more planning for reloads. The best suggestion I can make is to get good at reloads with retention, definitely helps to pick up some time.

As for the chambers getting sticky, brush it once or twice during the match. After a big match or a long day of practice give it a good scrubbing with solvent, I still like Hoppes 9. If it is really bad, pull the cylinder and soak it in solvent overnight (don't do this on nickel plated). I can't really speak to the Speer ammo, but if you do any reloading for it I have great luck with W231 under Bayou Bullets.

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I've not shot anything Speer, so I can't comment. If you're running into the issue after 150-200 rounds, and you're using factory ammo, I'd keep using WWB if that's what's available. The round count at local matches is well below 150-200, but if you do suspect your chambers are getting sticky, or you're shooting a larger sanctioned match, ask the SO if you can give your chambers a quick cleaning about halfway through the match. Once your squad finishes up, they'll likely go with you to the berm for safety reasons.

Hoppes ought to be ok. Everyone's got their favorite solvent, it seems. I use Kroil and Ed's Red. Kroil works very well, but I have to buy it over the internet. Ed's Red is homebrew (read: cheap & plentious), but it works well, too.

Something I do as a final step (don't know if anyone else does it) is run an ethanol-soaked patch through the chambers. The ethanol removes residual solvent which can otherwise act as a crud magnet. Dry surfaces just seem to stay cleaner longer.

Hmm noted. I haven't tried the Speer yet it was the WWB that was gumming up the cylinders. Though in retrospect I bought the gun used and did not clean it before I shot it the first time so that 150-200 round count might not be entirely accurate. I cleaned it up and haven't shot it since. The Speer will show up on my door step tomorrow and then I can give it a try. I'll remember that time about ethanol.

I started running my S&W 66 for IDPA over the summer and love using a revolver for IDPA. It adds a degree of challenge and changes your thinking completely. What was a simple point A to point B to point C stage with an auto takes more planning for reloads. The best suggestion I can make is to get good at reloads with retention, definitely helps to pick up some time.

As for the chambers getting sticky, brush it once or twice during the match. After a big match or a long day of practice give it a good scrubbing with solvent, I still like Hoppes 9. If it is really bad, pull the cylinder and soak it in solvent overnight (don't do this on nickel plated). I can't really speak to the Speer ammo, but if you do any reloading for it I have great luck with W231 under Bayou Bullets.

Why would I have to do a reload with retention with a revolver? You mean shoot 4 rounds dumb the rest then load 6 more? It would seem like unless I am lightening quick with a reload I'd be better off shooting until I'm dry.

How do I remove the cylinder in a 686? I'm not opposed to filling a jar with solvent and letting it soak over night after a match.

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Yes, that's the brush I use. Before a match, I run that brush on a short rod, once through each chamber. Then I use another rod with a clean 45 patch on it and spin it inside the chamber. After that I use a toothbrush under the ejector star. I shoot mostly plated bullets. I very seldom clean my revolvers other than what I just described. I've been running my 38 Special revolvers like that for the last 10 years with no problems. I've been using Bullseye powder in my revolvers for the last 30 years.

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I started running my S&W 66 for IDPA over the summer and love using a revolver for IDPA. It adds a degree of challenge and changes your thinking completely. What was a simple point A to point B to point C stage with an auto takes more planning for reloads. The best suggestion I can make is to get good at reloads with retention, definitely helps to pick up some time.

As for the chambers getting sticky, brush it once or twice during the match. After a big match or a long day of practice give it a good scrubbing with solvent, I still like Hoppes 9. If it is really bad, pull the cylinder and soak it in solvent overnight (don't do this on nickel plated). I can't really speak to the Speer ammo, but if you do any reloading for it I have great luck with W231 under Bayou Bullets.

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Why would I have to do a reload with retention with a revolver? You mean shoot 4 rounds dumb the rest then load 6 more? It would seem like unless I am lightening quick with a reload I'd be better off shooting until I'm dry.

How do I remove the cylinder in a 686? I'm not opposed to filling a jar with solvent and letting it soak over night after a match.

The majority of IDPA stages are created with handguns in mind and not revolvers. Between points of cover arrays break down better for auto shooters, while often leaving the revolver shooter to run dry when not at a point of cover. Reloading with retention is seen as working better than reloading when empty, as you work to limit the times that you are caught out in the open with an empty revolver. I shoot my revolver dry and then reload myself, as trying to retain live ammo while also trying to reload my revolver simply seems to add a level of complexity that I don't want to constantly deal with. If a shooter is using moonclips instead of speedloaders, then reloading with retention works better. I use speedloaders and thus choose not to add this action to my common group of actions if I don't have to. I can reload with retention pretty well, I just choose not to unless I have to by stage requirements.

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I can only think of one time that I had to do a reload with retention using a revolver. The way the stage was set up, when I arrived at the last target array, I had two live rounds in the gun. The last array had three targets. The first target had a popper behind it that triggered an out-and-back. So if I'd shot the first target before reloading, I would have been screwed.

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To do a reload with retention with a speed loader revolver: Do a strong hand reload. For a right handed shooter: Open the cylinder. Push the cylinder open with the 2 middle fingers of your left hand just like a normal reload. Up end the revolver over your cupped right hand. Do not press the ejector rod yet. The unfired rounds should drop free into your hand and the fired brass will usually stay in the cylinder. Put the unfired rounds in your pocket, press the ejector rod and do a normal strong hand reload. :)

I've run into several situations like M1911 described. Best to know how ahead of time. ;)

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Man I hadn't even thought about doing a reload with retention in a revolver. Knowing how my local club does IDPA matches I can't imagine I'll have to do it often. On any given match there is maybe 3 revolver shoots anyway.

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Man I hadn't even thought about doing a reload with retention in a revolver. Knowing how my local club does IDPA matches I can't imagine I'll have to do it often. On any given match there is maybe 3 revolver shoots anyway.

It's pretty rare. Generally only necessary when there is a mover that gets activated.

I've run into several situations like M1911 described. Best to know how ahead of time.

Yup. Count carefully and don't miss. Because if I miss, then my stage plan is all gone heck...

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