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J_Allen

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  1. I may be taking this out of context since it wasn’t the point of your post, but thought it would be worth mentioning.... but PLEASE do not use live rounds if you are doing any sort of gun manipulation during practice. Other options include snap caps or making some dummy rounds if you are a reloader. Without any other information, I am not trying to imply you are unsafe, but I do know that anyone can make a mistake, as we are all human. Taking live ammo out of the equation is just something that I would STRONGLY encourage.
  2. Then 929 gets the nod. Save your brass though, because you never know.
  3. When you say you own both calibers already, do you mean 357 mag revolver and 9mm semi-auto? If you don’t reload, then I feel like you would have to go with a S&W 929, since you are not going to find 38 short colt on the shelves. But even then, do the 929’s run factory 9mm out of the box? Don’t have any experience with that myself. My advice would be to take a serious look at getting into reloading first.
  4. Just go to the classifieds and look for the G22L that DK Customs has for sale. Great set-up that I believe would satisfy your requirements.
  5. LOL! Yeah, I can always learn a thing or two from this forum.
  6. OP here. I have been following this thread and have found some of the points brought up to be very interesting, so thank you for all the responses. Just to clarify, this never happened to me. The reason I was wondering is that I don’t currently own a single stack gun (sacrilege, I know!), and I was wondering what caliber I would choose to get one in: 9mm, 40 s&w, or 45 acp. So the idea of picking 40 s&w seemed to be the most flexible, as that you could declare both minor or major power factor for a match (both from the PF standpoint, and also from magazine capacity). So then it was just a theoretical question, thinking about a scenario where you could actually switch mid match. I was figuring that if one missed PF at chrono, that they wouldn’t have missed it by much (let’s say 164 PF), and then let’s say half of their stages were run with 8 in their mags. Therefore, switching to 10 for the remaining half of stages didn’t seem like a big deal to me, since they would be at a significant disadvantage compared to all other SS shooters for that specific match (assuming everyone else made their declared PF). I was not thinking about someone trying to game the system, or the advantage one would have if they hit the chrono earlier in the match before someone else. Mostly was thinking about the ability to somewhat salvage the match as much as possible. I will be really interested in the final ruling on this question.
  7. Yes, I just think it’s interesting in that it is the only case I can think of, where you can make a compensatory move after failing chrono to mitigate the change to minor.
  8. Just a theoretical question that I was thinking about the other day. Let’s say you are running a 40 s&w single stack rig, and register for major PF. At chrono you don’t make it and thus are scored minor for the match. Does this mean that all the subsequent stages you shoot after the chrono can now have the mags topped off at ten rounds rather than the eight you were loading before the chrono? I don’t see why not, as you won’t be getting an advantage in the match (assuming your ammo is way over minor PF, and all prior stages you were in essence running minor PF with eight round mags). Just curious.
  9. Thanks for the technical insight. I think I’ll stick with the .358 sized bullets. If it ain’t broken, don’t fix it.
  10. After a month of cancelled matches due to inclement weather and holiday, I finally had a chance to break out the revolver for a club match this year. Overall it went pretty well, although I did end up zeroing the classifier. Put two into hard cover and another into a no-shoot. They weren’t that far off the mark, but I probably got a little too jumpy and didn’t wait for a clean sight picture. The longer courses went a lot better, one of which I really felt I did a solid job on (beat 50% of the field). I was probably at my best, so I cannot extrapolate it out to my overall level right now, but it does show me what I am capable of and if I work hard to consistently perform at that level I would be super pleased. I only have one more match before our Sectionals, so there is no way I can move up to C class by then, but I really think I can do it if I hit decent back-to-back Classifiers. Don’t even have to burn them down, just avoid penalties. So that’s my goal by the end of the summer.
  11. Ben, what’s your trigger pull at now?
  12. So just for my own clarification - I understand that you can get an aftermarket trigger and still be production legal, so it really doesn’t matter what you do for a trigger. However, all the aftermarket ones I am aware of (which implies that there will be a bunch I’m not familiar with) have a trigger safety. Assuming you can adjust the pretravel of these to shorten the trigger pull, won’t you reach a point where shortening it any more will result in the safety lever failing to engage on the frame? In that case, all triggers on glocks will reach the same point at which point they can’t be reduced any further while still staying production legal. If this reasoning is incorrect, can anyone point me to an example of a trigger that would be legal in this scenario. I’m just curious.
  13. Although there are a few Glock triggers that can adjust the pretravel, I think you will be limited by the point at which the trigger safety become unusable. The trigger would still be useable, but per the rules “removing any safety mechanism in Production division is strictly prohibited.”
  14. Thanks so much for that explanation! I’m not going to worry about it as much anymore.
  15. Thanks everyone for the advice. The reason I was thinking of switching was to reduce the bulged brass I get when seating the larger diameter bullets. I haven’t had a ton of trouble reloading, but do notice that my snap caps fall into the cylinder much better than my loaded rounds do. I didn’t know if the bullet diameter was a possible factor for this or not.
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