Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
Sign in to follow this  
Chris Keen

FIRE SAFETY

Recommended Posts

When I load I keep my bench as cleans as possible and all my powder primers locked in my safe. I only fill the powder measure then put the rest up. I also keep fire extinguisher in room and smoke detector my room is small so my backup exit is my window

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I load I keep my bench as cleans as possible and all my powder primers locked in my safe. I only fill the powder measure then put the rest up. I also keep fire extinguisher in room and smoke detector my room is small so my backup exit is my window

Powder and primers inside of a safe = bomb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Powders/Primers/Bullets= Bomb no matter what. I figure at least in my Fire Rated Safe it keeps them safer then laying powder all around my house for a thief to get and moisture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Powders/Primers/Bullets= Bomb no matter what. I figure at least in my Fire Rated Safe it keeps them safer then laying powder all around my house for a thief to get and moisture.

Not true. If not contained by a huge metal box, they blow up and go nowhere. Watch that video that Chris Keen posted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get the MSDS for the powders you have.

for instance, http://www.accuratepowder.com/products/msds/

the MSDS has explicit instructions for dealing with smokeless powder fires.

specifically take note:

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA:
Apply large volumes of water as quickly as possible from automatic sprinklers or with fire hose from a distant,protected location. FIGHT EXPLOSIVE FIRES ONLY FROM WELL PROTECTED,DISTANT (FROM POINT OF FIRE) LOCATION.
Since product is self-oxidizing, smothering agents such as dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or foam are ineffective.

that last sentence is extremely important!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From SAMMI:

Storage enclosures for smokeless powder should be constructed in a similar manner:

  1. Of fire-resistant and heat-insulating materials to protect contents from external heat.

  2. Sufficiently loose to vent the gaseous products of combustion satisfactorily which would result if the quantity of smokeless powder within the enclosure accidentally ignited. Storage cabinets should be constructed of insulating materials and with a weak wall, seams or joints to provide an easy means of self- ventilation.

If you've ever seen industrial paint cabinets, they're not much more than an insulated metal box with a vent. They do lock so the door has a latch. It's no stretch to see that an old refrigerator with a magnetic strip door (NOT the old latch type) is perfect for storing powder. Unplug it first!

Obviously, since by law a refrigerator door must be able to be opened by a toddler, it will not allow pressure to build up in a fire.

Edited by blujax01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for this thread, New reloading bench for me, def need to add a couple more extinguishers in the loading room as well.

THAT IS THE SOUND OF INEVITABILITY !

Edited by Warpdrv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have dealt with a lot of explosives in my military career. The prefered container no-spark no-static interior (wood with brass hardware). Outside strong to control blast, the top should be loose or weak enough to blow off from blast. This way you will not stop the problem but control it to the point of keeping damage to a minimum. And always store detonator and charge far from each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lookup NFPA recommendations for storage of smokeless powder. It's likely your local AHJ has adopted these for storage of powder. 1" nominal thickness wooden box for any decent amount of powder. For the powder to catch fire the wood will have burned through creating a vent. If you want some extra fire protection put a layer of fire board on the outside.

If being in violation of fire code, electrical code, using non-UL appliances was enough for an insurer to deny a claim almost no house fires would be covered.

If you didn't set it on fire on purpose it's covered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's some great information in this thread. Every reloader should keep this in mind and have a plan for the worst case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one 8-lb container of powder. I keep it underneath a table and against a back wall, surrounded by 4 gallons of water in plastic bottles and 4 boxes of sodium bicarbonate. The idea is if it burns, it'll immediately release water and carbon dioxide. Since gunpowder contains both oxidizer and reducer, don't know how effective the carbon dioxide would be but the water should be a definite help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one 8-lb container of powder. I keep it underneath a table and against a back wall, surrounded by 4 gallons of water in plastic bottles and 4 boxes of sodium bicarbonate. The idea is if it burns, it'll immediately release water and carbon dioxide. Since gunpowder contains both oxidizer and reducer, don't know how effective the carbon dioxide would be but the water should be a definite help.

Someone posted the MSDS sheet upthread. Water will be somewhat effective, but carbon dioxide will have no impact on smokeless powder burning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one 8-lb container of powder. I keep it underneath a table and against a back wall, surrounded by 4 gallons of water in plastic bottles and 4 boxes of sodium bicarbonate. The idea is if it burns, it'll immediately release water and carbon dioxide. Since gunpowder contains both oxidizer and reducer, don't know how effective the carbon dioxide would be but the water should be a definite help.

Fire Protection is a real field of work, and industry standards for safe storage of most flammable materials, like smokeless powder, have been established. Sodium Bicarbonate is not involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd also recommend not doing any work with an open flame near a workbench that you previously reloaded.  I once set off a primer with a blow torch by accident.  I had taken all my relaoding stuff off the bench but didn't see the primer.  I'm sure there was powder on the bench also.  Luckily didnt get hurt.  +1 on fire extinguisher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...