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Most Common .223 Bullet Weight


Robert Hode

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55's I'd guess.. since the largest percentage of targets are under 100 yards..

When you start getting out to 200-350yds or more.. 69s, I would think become the most common

+1

I have put this in another post,,

my 55's, 69's and 77's all fly close enough,, to use the same. data.

24.1Gr 2230 for all.

55's are most common.

jim M ammo

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According to Matt Burkett - who is one of the best 3-gunners in the world - it's not quite as simple as picking just one bullet weight, if you really want every advantage. Lighter bullets give less gun movement during rapid fire, and thus are the choice for close range stages where you need to run the rifle really fast and accurately. OTOH, heavy bullets drop steel targets at long range better. You're not allowed to switch ammo during a match, you have to pick one and use it for the entire match, so Matt carries multiple loads with him to the match, when he gets there, if possible - and it usually is - he looks over the stages, figures out of it's a match with mostly close range targets, in which case he grabs the go-fast ammo, or a match with a lot of steel at distance, in which case he grabs the drop-steel ammo.

Sorry, I know that's not the simple "which bullet weight is most common" answer you were looking for. There really are advantages to be had in 3-gun that come from understanding some of the complexities, versus having a "do the same thing" every time approach, and choice of bullet weight is one of them.

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According to Matt Burkett - who is one of the best 3-gunners in the world - it's not quite as simple as picking just one bullet weight, if you really want every advantage. Lighter bullets give less gun movement during rapid fire, and thus are the choice for close range stages where you need to run the rifle really fast and accurately. OTOH, heavy bullets drop steel targets at long range better. You're not allowed to switch ammo during a match, you have to pick one and use it for the entire match, so Matt carries multiple loads with him to the match, when he gets there, if possible - and it usually is - he looks over the stages, figures out of it's a match with mostly close range targets, in which case he grabs the go-fast ammo, or a match with a lot of steel at distance, in which case he grabs the drop-steel ammo.

Sorry, I know that's not the simple "which bullet weight is most common" answer you were looking for. There really are advantages to be had in 3-gun that come from understanding some of the complexities, versus having a "do the same thing" every time approach, and choice of bullet weight is one of them.

"""""""""""""You're not allowed to switch ammo during a match""""""""""""" Is that a USPSA rule?

I don't shoot many non outlaw,,,,, 3 Gun matches, but I know many of us,,,, shoot more than one type of rifle bullet in a 3 gun match

,,

For a close in hoser stage,, the factor is economic,,, I would not shoot my 77's They cost real money.. All of the loads make power factor, of the USPSA standard.

For under 200 yards, 55’s rule. They are cheap and work well in all situations.

The heavier bullets are to fight the wind, and to get a Bigger hit on steal so that the RO can call it better.

I’m not the only one who does it.

I didn’t think I was cheating.

Jim M ammo

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I think the switching ammo rule must be match specific. At the unsanctioned matches that I have been too, as long as the ammo meets the rules (non magnetic, makes power factor if there is a chrono, etc) it is good to go. I just reread the Ft.Benning rules (the most recent match held) and there was no mention of using only one type/weight bullet for the match. I also use good stuff for long range and 55s for the hoser stuff, mainly for economic reasons. At one of my first big three gun matches I was fortunate enough to get squadded with some of the guys that are consistently at or very near the top and one of them got on to me for wasting expensive ammunition on close targets (I had only brought high quality, expensive ammo to the match that I had zeroed my rifle for).

Hurley

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I think the switching ammo rule must be match specific. At the unsanctioned matches that I have been too, as long as the ammo meets the rules (non magnetic, makes power factor if there is a chrono, etc) it is good to go. I just reread the Ft.Benning rules (the most recent match held) and there was no mention of using only one type/weight bullet for the match. I also use good stuff for long range and 55s for the hoser stuff, mainly for economic reasons. At one of my first big three gun matches I was fortunate enough to get squadded with some of the guys that are consistently at or very near the top and one of them got on to me for wasting expensive ammunition on close targets (I had only brought high quality, expensive ammo to the match that I had zeroed my rifle for).

Hurley

Thanks for posting,,,, I have only shot two USPSA 3 gun matches,,, Both nationals. and with the 69's or 55's I'm not worried,,, they both make PF,,,, also after 25+ years shooting,,, I have been Crono'ed only those two times.

I want rifle rounds to shoot flat,, so going Min or low PF,,, is not worth it to me,, and shooting with a comp,,,,

Gas is good

Jim M ammo

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69 grain on steel or more than 300 yards out.

I've been looking at prices (at Midway) for 100 bullets :

Hornady 68gr HP Match, $17.00

Hornady 75gr HP Match, $17.50

Hornady 75gr A-Max, $17.80

Sierra 65gr SP GameKing, $17.80

Hornady 80gr A-Max, $18.80

Sierra 69gr HP MatchKing, $20.00

I've already got a case of MG 55's on order but want to get some heavier bullets to test out for longer range. I've seen some reports of really good accuracy with the A-Max over Varget (which I have due in) and am thinking of trying the 75gr.

Comments?

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It depends on your barrel twist. In my limited experience the 75s generally don't do as well in 1/9 or slower barrels, however some people's rifles like them. Most folks tell me not to run anything heavier than a 69gr in a 1/9 barrel. I have a rifle with a 1/7 that likes 75gr bullets. It will also shoot well with Hornady 55fmj. Some of the other 55fmj factory loads don't do as well out of this rifle. So I guess what I am trying to say is buy some of several different brands and weights, load them up and go to the range. Be sure to carry a notebook and record data from each one, then feed your rifle what it likes.

Hurley

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Don 't buy the 75 or 80 grain Amax bullets. They are meant for High Power competition and single loading for the 600 yard slow fire.

I didn't know that. Thanks.

After a lot of putzing around, it seems that I've come to the same conclusion a lot of others have - just spend a few extra bucks and get the 69gr SMK's. I've got a 1:8 twist and have some Varget on order - should be interesting.

This is, after all, a learning process!

Edited by Graham Smith
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My 1:8 RRA prefers the Hornady 75gr BTHP's over the Sierra's out to 200. I do have some 75gr amax that I bought to shoot out at 3-600yds, but they cannot be loaded to magazine length because of the amax tip. Depending on your rifle, you may find it prefers the sierra's over the Hornady's at a certain distance then the opposite at a different range. I bought 3 or 4 different bullet weights and mfg's to find what mine liked the best..........

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"""""""""""""You're not allowed to switch ammo during a match""""""""""""" Is that a USPSA rule?

I don't shoot many non outlaw,,,,, 3 Gun matches, but I know many of us,,,, shoot more than one type of rifle bullet in a 3 gun match

,,

For a close in hoser stage,, the factor is economic,,, I would not shoot my 77's They cost real money.. All of the loads make power factor, of the USPSA standard.

For under 200 yards, 55’s rule. They are cheap and work well in all situations.

The heavier bullets are to fight the wind, and to get a Bigger hit on steal so that the RO can call it better.

I’m not the only one who does it.

I didn’t think I was cheating.

Jim M ammo

You are not cheating. Under USPSA rules multiple bullet weights are ok. But under the crono rules both are subject to being cronographed. Make sure you make the declared power factor and you are good to go. As for the non USPSA matches there is no rules prohibiting the practice that I have ever encountered. They don't even care what the power factor is.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I also would have to say 55 grn, but as many have posted they also use 69, 75 and 77 grn. I find that the last three bullets are good for the long range targets and also to buck the wind better. Also when a 77 grn bullets hits a long range target it is going to have more energy.

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