Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
Sign in to follow this  
j1b

Shooting the bow

Recommended Posts

I believe you learn in all things you do. Shooting my bow recently, I've noticed some things that either remind of things or teach me things that will help my shooting.

First off, you can't look for the shot. When you release, if you immediately switch to look for where it went, you've impacted it. Likely because I started looking before I released. These micro-movements impact the shot and affect the group. To some extent this is more prevalent with the bow because you can truly see the arrow, but I also know at times I've looked for the holes on a target . . .

Second off, if you focus on a few fundamentals it is amazing how many fliers just go away. I little sight focus, and deliberate focus go a long ways!

It's interesting when I switched from shooting groups to one arrow one target my focus went up. Specifically when the spot was close to the edge of the overall target. Almost instantly I noticed my focus got more deliberate because even a small mis-cue would cause the arrow to hit the dust. I shoot $12 arrows, so I can't exactly afford that.

Finally, movement effects accuracy. Period. It's why I have a miss every now and again in transitions. With a fast bullet this get minimalized however I remember this lesson very clearly one day while shooting 9x25. It became very prevalent and I believe was a very big step in my shooting career. It's transfered easily into the production and limited shooting that I've done. It is remarkably impactful with the bow!!!

In the end, it's about focus. Too much and you over think every detail. Too little and you get sloppy.

I'm no Robin Hood, but I do enjoy learning how to send projectiles down range and doing it as affectively as possible.

Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My trick of the day tonight was quite simple.

I was shooting 30 yards, and I decided I was going to keep that green dot on the target as long as could, before the shot and after. Worked well! Shot the best groups I've shot thus far, with much more consistency. The flyers didn't fly as far either.

It's the same idea around not watching the arrow fly, but that focus on keeping it in the target even after the shot really helped my follow through.

Fun night of shooting. I like it, I can shoot for 20 minutes, get done what I want, and be back at the house.

Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practicing instinctive style archery, without sights on the bow, will also help develop both point shooting skill and the ability to get the gun on target quickly.

Hard focusing on the target and trusting your form, instead of overly relying on sights, will speed things up considerably.

The gun (or bow) comes on target and the sights are just there, right where they oughta' be.

The hardest part of this is trusting and believing you can do it.

My unsolicited advice.

Edited by g.willikers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Practicing instinctive style archery, without sights on the bow, will also help develop both point shooting skill and the ability to get the gun on target quickly.

Hard focusing on the target and trusting your form, instead of overly relying on sights, will speed things up considerably.

The gun (or bow) comes on target and the sights are just there, right where they oughta' be.

The hardest part of this is trusting and believing you can do it.

My unsolicited advice.

I've watched some videos of truly amazing talented instinct shooters - great stuff.

I was shooting 30 yards, and I decided I was going to keep that green dot on the target as long as could, before the shot and after.

I learned a similar mental technique when practicing for the Sportsman's Team Challenge, shooting the 4" square plates at 35 yards with a 38 Super. I'd empty my mind of all but one thing. Look at the middle of the target until it falls over.

be

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And to really polish your form stretch the distance on windless days or days with a constant wind. When I was shooting a lot of 3D I shot almost all of my practice at 60-90 yards. Getting LONG really magnifies errors in form, and it saves a lot of wear and tear on the arrows. It forces you to think the shot off rather than making the shot go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×