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Keys to success - Mover


Flexmoney
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Sight focus is the name of the game. Start looking for your hits and you're screwed - I know, I've seen me do it.

Knowing your lead points are essential (there's other posts on this - do a search). When the target appears, I like to draw and then have my sights "catch up" to the lead point and then being making my shots. Also, after your last shot, don't just drop the gun. Maintain your sights on the lead point until the target disappears.

I typically have my toes point at a 90deg angle. The seems to allow my hips to turn more freely, especially on the 10 and 15 yd lines where you have to make big swings.

Again, use your time. You have 6 seconds no matter what. Often I find I'm making my last shot at 5.xx seconds, and sometimes just before it disappears.

Don't let this CoF intimidate you. It does many people, but of the four, it is probably the easiest to shoot a good score one. Not easy to clean, but pretty decent to get a high score.

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I typically have my toes point at a 90deg angle. The seems to allow my hips to turn more freely, especially on the 10 and 15 yd lines where you have to make big swings.

Ah-ha!

That is what I am always telling people about their feet. I learned it from shooting Steel Challenge, but it applies everywhere. I keep my toes pointed wider than any swing I have to make. The keeps my inside my center (inside my knees) and give locomotion and strength.

Shooting different games does help! :)

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Sight focus is the name of the game. Start looking for your hits and you're screwed - I know, I've seen me do it.

Knowing your lead points are essential (there's other posts on this - do a search). When the target appears, I like to draw and then have my sights "catch up" to the lead point and then being making my shots. Also, after your last shot, don't just drop the gun. Maintain your sights on the lead point until the target disappears.

I typically have my toes point at a 90deg angle. The seems to allow my hips to turn more freely, especially on the 10 and 15 yd lines where you have to make big swings.

Again, use your time. You have 6 seconds no matter what. Often I find I'm making my last shot at 5.xx seconds, and sometimes just before it disappears.

Don't let this CoF intimidate you. It does many people, but of the four, it is probably the easiest to shoot a good score one. Not easy to clean, but pretty decent to get a high score.

I agree with you fully.

I have been told by some top shooters that the best time to shot is in the middle section of the track as this gives you a shorter distacne to the target. I my self Like to use the full time to make all the shots.

The most important thing I was told was to watch the dot and the shots will fire them selves and also to keep moving with the target when firing.

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Set yourself up comfortably for where you are going to shoot your shots. Most of your shots will be in the last 2/3rds of travel. With that done you can swivel from the knees and not alter your stance too much. As the body is moving, your stance is not as solid as normal, so lean into the shot more. Draw fast, but get a good grip. This is one event where you have to make good use of time available to shoot good scores. Draw the gun to the point in travel where you are engaging the target.eg 1/3 distance. I find that if you start behind the target,you will be playing catch-up and wasting good time. At 20 & 25,The arc of swing is less.So if you get the draw right you have more time to really watch the dot, prep the trigger and pop them in the middle. Do not watch the fall of shot.

'Bang! Jeez that was an eight! Bang! And that is another one right alongside :sick:

coatesy

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My son shoots the mover very quickly in the center section of the run. He shoots what I think is to quickly, but he gets the job done. Another thing is to remember the follow through with the last shot. If you don't it can cost you a nickel very easily.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Caspian1,

The problem is he has better eyes and reactions compared to us older farts, my daughter does something similar, but she is still learning.

I see a lot of guys draw quick, lock into the target and just bang them away, the first parts are perfect, but if they shoot to a specific cadence they will follow 8 after 8 after 8. If he is honestly shooting good (although really quick) sight pictures then leave him alone. GrantJ here on this forum shoots his 3 shot passes this way. He will lock in, wait for a real good sight picture and shoot quick. It works well for him. Do not under any circumstances duplicate his stance. It is a mess. But it works for him.

I find that I am quick at the front on my draw, then for no reason I will on occaisions draw real sloooooow, then I have to catch up. I mostly dump points at 25y because of this.

I open up my stance a little for mover, but as I am intending to be shooting in the back 2/3rds of the run as goldfieldshooter suggests it is not a problem. Keep an eye on how you body wants to swing, don't make it over rotate, you must be as natural as you can, minimum stress on the lower extremeties. So therefore I rotate my whole stance (60 - 90 degress) for the return run. Again keeping the likely area of firing to within my natural swing.

GM

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Like caspian1 said I shoot the mover really quick. I get a good sight picture on the first shot. I shoot the 20 and 25 yard shots in the middle of the run. Although sometimes the first shot gets away from me, because I get on the trigger to quick. I find this better. I have tried to shoot it slow but I tend to throw more eights.

Travis

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One thing that helps is if you can aim right at the X instead of estimating the lead. Metallic shooters can use a mover front sight, open shooters can use a

mover base. That way it's almost like shooting the stationary targets, at least for the aiming part.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ah the Mover! Years past my favorite. I do not have a mover to practice on, and when I first started I would shoot the mover quite well. Often clean to 4 points down with no pracyice on a mover at all. I had few expectations for th mover at that time, I just worked at each shot, held as good as could be expected since afterall it is moving, then work the trigger. I always got good results.

Years later, my expectations changed. I just knew I should clean it everytime. I started seeking out movers to practice on. I found that I was (still am) trying to hard, not relaxed enough, and trying to make the gun shoot, instead of letting it shoot. For years I shot the mover best with a revolver, as I just got a good sight picture, proper lead ands just kept the trigger moving until the shot broke, then repeat. With the semi auto, I am trying to make the shots better than I should expect, thus making the shot worse. Again, problem is between the ears!

MJ

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  • 1 month later...
Sorry, but what's the Mover? Anyone can post a video? We might have a different term for it down in Asia? :unsure:

Briefly it is a target hung on the carrier which travels perpendicular to the shooter at a speed of 10 fps for a distance of 60 ft. Thus you always have 6 seconds of shooting time as the target passes R to L, then L to R.

At 10 & 15 yd distances you must shoot 6 shots per pass, or 6 shots in 6 seconds. One pass each R to L then L to R.

At 20 & 25 yd distances you shoot 3 shots per pass. Two passes each R to L, then L to R.

Target is NRA AP-1 which resembles a tombstone shape, with a 4" X ring, a 8" Ten ring, a 12" Eight ring.

Hope this helps :cheers:

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Since I don't have a mover yet I was trying to calculate mathmatically what the lead would be. Did I get this right?

Distance to target in feet / FPS of load x 120 (target speed in FPS x 12 inches in a foot) = lead

I came up with the following values using this formula for different bullet velocities

----------1000-----1050-----1100-----1200

10-------3.6-------3.43------3.27------3

15-------5.4-------5.14------4.91------4.5

20-------7.2-------6.86------6.55------6

25-------9---------8.57------8.18------7.5

Edited by Chuck Anderson
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Since I don't have a mover yet I was trying to calculate mathmatically what the lead would be. Did I get this right?

Distance to target in feet / FPS of load x 120 (target speed in FPS x 12 inches in a foot) = lead

I came up with the following values using this formula for different bullet velocities

----------1000-----1050-----1100-----1200

10-------3.6-------3.43------3.27------3

15-------5.4-------5.14------4.91------4.5

20-------7.2-------6.86------6.55------6

25-------9---------8.57------8.18------7.5

Yes, Chuck, the formula (equation) is correct for a target travelling at 10 fps and providing lead in inches.

Note that the radius for the X ring is 2", the 10 ring is 4", the 8 ring is 6", and the target half width is 9", then these references serve as pretty good "hold" references any of these loads.

MJ

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  • 2 months later...

Get a calculator out and run these numbers.

The speed of you bullets don't really matter that much. 100 fps either way is about an inch. That's no biggie....

but change the speed of the target.... now that's when the leads get screwy.

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There are many different methods to shooting the mover. For years, Doug and I had very differnt styles.

Doug would chase the target and fire when the dot touched the X. He would do this for every shot at 20 & 25 yds.

He's since changed to more like I shoot it.

I draw fast, get on target and track it for about 10 feet. Then I start working the trigger.

I've found that by doing it this way, once the shot breaks, my dot returns to the center rather than behind it. It kind of builds the swing into my body.

I also like to take my time and really work the trigger no matter how much time it takes, giving no account to how much of the range I use. However, on days when I'm working the trigger well, the shot breaks quicker and I seem to finish quick and may look like I'm purposely shooting in the center of the range.

I can confirm that, especially up close, errors are multiplied the further out from the center of the range you shoot. So there is some merit to people who shoot quickly in the center. It's a method that in the shooter's mind, they are preparing to have a bad shot so they are trying to minimize the error. However, if you really focus and work the trigger well, it doesn't matter where you shoot because good shots will be center, no matter where it is fired.

When shooting open, I focus more on the target than the dot. I turn the dot way low, almost low enough where I can see thru it. Kind of goes against what many people think is right.

The real trick is to practice every way you can. If one day your dot comes off center, then you've practiced "chasing" the center, and you won't go into panic mode because the gun happened to bounce funny that day. If you one day you ride the center well, then you know you have all the time in the world to take your time on the trigger.

Edited by BPiatt
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Bruce, that very last little bit was what I really needed. I think I get too caught up in my method, and then when something happens I am all out of whack. Maybe I should practice for an "oops" :unsure: and then it might go smoother if (when) it happens.

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  • 10 months later...

Just an FYI, if you don't have a Mover at your local range; shoot Skeet. In the days before Mover Dots or Mover Bases, I would take people struggling and have them shoot Skeet for a while. Results improved drastically. Understanding follow through was the best thing.

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  • 4 years later...
  • 8 months later...

A great way for beginners (or even veterans) to practice shooting the Mover (and the way I am teaching my sons) is to set up a target directly in front of the mover standing positions, or if you don't have access to a mover, set it up on the range. Stand at each position and set your Timer to 6 seconds with a delay. (It would be better to have someone stand behind you with a timer and start it when you go hands up.) Draw and shoot from each position as you would normally (6 and 6 at 10, 6 and 6 at 15 then 3 and 3 at 20 and 25) without moving the target. My theory on this is that if you can't hit the X or 10 ring (or whatever your goal is) when the target isn't moving, then your chances go WAY down when it is.

If you don't have a mover base (Open) and are shooting Metallic or Production, the next step would be to repeat the drill above except this time shoot at your leads. You can make a mark on your targets at first where you want the rounds to hit but as you progress, the marks shouldn't be visible from the shooting position. Go through the whole event without the target moving and see how you do.

The Mover is a scary event, but if you know that you have the skills to hit the X or 10 ring when the target is static, it gives you some confidence. Of course there are other issues that go along with the Mover once you begin shooting at a moving target, and those can be worked on and refined as you go. I would venture to say that a lot of beginning and intermediate AP shooters can't shoot a 480 using the static target drill yet put way too much pressure on themselves to do it while the target is moving. Know your limitations and set REALISTIC goals for yourself.

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Where most Metallic Sight (no mover front sight) and Productions shooters begin to lose it is that they "score" their target as they are shooting. They get the proper lead factor going for the first and maybe the second shot, then start looking at their hits. This tends to make the gun point at the hits where they're looking instead of the proper lead factor they used for the first shots which were probably really good hits!

Practice on static targets works in the beginning, but in the end, a real mover is essential to fine-tune your shooting on this event.

I see that BaggerJoe is in LA, so get with the guys at Lake Charles, if you haven't already. They are some of the best in the country and they have 2 movers set up. Their web site is:

https://southwestlouisianarifleandpistolclubinc.wildapricot.org

Tell 'em Alan sent ya' and I promise they won't giggle more than a couple of minutes!

Alan~^~

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