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Keys to success - Bianchi Barricade


Flexmoney
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[How is this description?]

The Barricade Event, consists of four stages, each stage has 2 strings of 6 shots per string, 48-shots total. One string fired from the left side of the barricade at the left target. The second string is from the right side of the barricade at the right target. The target (2 targets) is the NRA paper D1, fired at 10, 15, 25 and 35 yards in 5, 6, 7 & 8 seconds respectively.

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I still use the hunt and peck method of typing so don't look at me to do it.

The Barricade is a technique event more than a shooting event. The shooting doesn't get tough until 35 yards.

Open Class

Shoot the left side first for a right hander and the right side for a southpaw. Since I'm right handed I'll go through this from my perspective. Practice over and over how you will mount the gun to the barricade. You have to be able to get the first shot off within 2.5 sec. At the standby command, burn a hole in the x ring with your eyes (stationary target) and bring the gun to the target without looking at the gun. I really don't pay much attention to the dot at 10 and 15. If you are looking at the right place the dot will go where you are looking. For the right side, practice the transfer to the weak hand until it becomes natural. It must be smooth to make the time at 10 yards. Some shooters grab the scope with their right hand and place the gun on the barricade and then grip it with the left hand. I don't want to think about drawing differently so I draw with my right hand, transfer to the left and mount the gun on the barricade.

When you first start out, the 10 yard line will intimidate because it's only 5 seconds. You will have to hurry at first. I'm at the point now where I don't feel rushed at all. Make a mental note of how much time you had left on the left side. If you just barely got the shots off then you know you will have to pick up the pace on the right side.

Metallic and Production

I don't mess with the Barricade at 10 and 15. At 25 and 35 I'll use my left hand thumb to steady the gun on the right side. The left side is still a work in progress for me. A lot of shooters that I have watched will cant the gun to the left so that their left hand is touching the flat of the barricade. This causes changes in impact so you will have to know where you need to aim. Others will just stand there and work the trigger without using the barricade.

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Make a mental note of how much time you had left on the left side. If you just barely got the shots off then you know you will have to pick up the pace on the right side.

Ahhh...so that is why you shot the other side first?

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Good comeback, Flex.

Sometimes when you have done something for so long you may think it but not say it.

The reason for that is you are transferring the gun to the weak hand, therefore it will take longer to get the gun mounted and shoot the shots.

I shot my first Bianchi in 2000. I was standing there on the plate range at the 20 yard line waiting for the start signal. I was trying to run through my mind the sequence to go prone. (Rookie mistake) I couldn't think of how I did it. I wiped the thought from my mind and when the start signal sounded I went prone and shot my plates. The point is, training is the key. Practice the events and work out your difficulties. Practice some more until it becomes second nature. Wipe your mind clean and shoot the shots. We all have a 1920 screaming to get out. It's the mind that gets in the way.

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Good point Action Pistolero, (Open Gun) I always start shooting with the strong hand controlling the pistol, The when I shoot the other side with the left hand controlling I grab by the but of the gun and place it up to the barricade and make the wing hit the barricade then I grab the grip with the left hand and grab the shourd with the right hand. When I move back to the next distance I use the same side of the barricade that I just shot at the closer distance, I fellthe muscle memory is still there, I have always shot it this way and it seems to work for me. I have never been one for grabbing the scope. I have seen a couple of problems when the scope has been used to draw the gun, One is the mounts can fatigue and break or crack the other is you can move the mover mount and all your shoots will not be in the middle. That depends on the type of mover mount you have. When I shoot 35 yards I usually have to aim off low left of the xring to place the shot inthe middle of the x, This happens on both the right and left sides of the barricade. I found that out by doing a lot practice sessions to see were the shot were being place at each distance to allow me to make the adjustments when in the heat of the moment.

as for metallic I am still trying to work out a good way of using the barricade to support the hand.

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How many of you open guys draw the gun by grabbing the scope when you're shooting weak handed on this stage?

I don't know of anyone here locally in southwest virginia that draws with the scope. One shooter used to but we have broke him from doing it.

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It all comes down to what you practice that works for you. At least one of our top shooters in VA uses the "scope grab" method with great success. I used it in years past but found it to be awkward if I missed the barricade with the wings on the first try. Really slows you down to have to re-mount that thing, especially at the 10 yd line with only 5 seconds to "play". I found myself having to take my eyes off the target to watch the mounting of the gun on the barricade to be sure I got it in the right place. There's just not enough time to be doing that IMHO. As I said though, it works for some.

Like Kevin, I use the switch-hand but that takes a bit of practice to get it down to a smooth transition. Doug shows the way to do it on the video he did a number of years ago, by holding the draw-hand thumb out of the way as you transfer the gun to your weak hand. Do a bunch of dry-runs in practice at home to get the transfer as smooth as you can get it. The easiest way I found to do that in the beginning is to mount the gun in the firing position that you'll be using with your weak hand operating the trigger and, paying close attention to your actions, re-holster the gun. You've just performed the exact reverse of what you need to accomplish in your draw & transfer. Most shooters can holster their gun without looking at it just from muscle memory, so build on the reverse of that in your draw & transfer.

Alan~^~

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I don't know of anyone here locally in southwest virginia that draws with the scope. One shooter used to but we have broke him from doing it.

Could you expand on that for us? Pros and Cons, in your experience?

The guy using the scope to draw, done alright most of the time. Every once in a while though he moved the leader in his scope. Then he would be shooting way to the left. He would also miss the mount to the barricade every now and then. As Alan550 said it is almost impossible to get straightened back out. If drawing by the gun and you have a mounting problem you can usually get straightened out in time. I know someone is going to chime in and say I have been drawing with the scope for years with no problem. I am just speaking from my own experience.

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I don't know of anyone here locally in southwest virginia that draws with the scope. One shooter used to but we have broke him from doing it.

Could you expand on that for us? Pros and Cons, in your experience?

The guy using the scope to draw, done alright most of the time. Every once in a while though he moved the leader in his scope. Then he would be shooting way to the left. He would also miss the mount to the barricade every now and then. As Alan550 said it is almost impossible to get straightened back out. If drawing by the gun and you have a mounting problem you can usually get straightened out in time. I know someone is going to chime in and say I have been drawing with the scope for years with no problem. I am just speaking from my own experience.

A fair few of the Guys I shoot with have been drawing from the scope without any problems what so ever, But I have seen a number of times the mover mount getting hit and shifting. I started to do that for a bit then I have a mover mount fitted to my gun and the way I drew using the scope caused the mount to digg into my hand so I changed to drawing from the bottom of the butt/magwell.

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Grip Like F$%&, both sides when shooting Open. I usually have to slide down the X ring as we move back. My gun shoot higher as I go back. Start at Centre and Slide up. Sight in your handgun for 50Y and then check your Point of Aim under match conditions (ie shoot each distance two or three times consecutively on new targets until you know your aim point perfectly), do not just hand onto the barricade and take careful single shots. Shoot all six as if you were in a match.

Metallic. Right side of Barricade. Get your self well planted in the box, steady, left foot forward, I knuckle up with the left hand at all distances if the barricades are not too floppy. If floppy leave the barricade alone at 10 and sometimes 15.

Left side. Right foot forward and left foot not too far to the right. But you must not be over balanced to the left. When touching the barricade I cant to the left a little and hold the front sight just under the black dot (6 O'Clock hold) as if the gun was really vertical. It looks like the target is effectively tipped to the right. I think this is similar to what Bruce Piatt does, although he seems to produce slightly better groups than I do at this time. You will need a glove with a little padding for the left hand. This will stop you ripping up your knuckles on the barricade.

Now to throw a spanner in that theory. TGO shot a 480-35X at the 2005 Cup without touching the barricade at all. :ph34r:

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What works for me being right handed and shooting the right side barricade weak handed, I use a "normal" draw and transfer. It is much more consistent and quicker for me than the scope draw. Maybe because that was a skill already learned from USPSA but I believe there is less disaster factor at least with the auto. Having said all that I've seen other mostly revolver shooters do the scope draw very well, IIRC our host being one of them.

Clamp yourself and the pistol to the barricade but don't put any push or pull into the barricade at all. I think of it like I'm using my body to form a a brace for the barricade. Just go with the vibration as you shoot. If you have your pistol set up right, and the barricade grip right, you feel like you can close your eyes and shoot x's once you get set up.

Know the exact spot on the barricade your going to, don't start firing until you have your set up and the dot is settled in the x ring. If you fumbled a little you will need to pick up the time between shots, if it went extra smooth you have a little extra time between shots. Very important to develop that internal clock.

GM, I'm puzzled by your statement that your pistol shoots higher as you move back. Assuming you're using a dot it's usually the opposite. I need to put the dot at the top of the x ring at 10 yds and then it is pretty much dead on all the way back. This is because of the height of the dot above the bore line. I'm wondering if it is a vision thing, have you shot off bags at a black bullseye at the different distances?

I guess everyone knows that Brian is the reason we clamp our guns to the barricade anyway? One year he showed up with his PPC revolver and a very crude Aimpoint which he held onto the barricade and changed everything, but not only on the barricade. I couldn't shoot a revolver on the mover at all so I had to stay with the auto and figure out a way to hold it onto the barricade.

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Ross,

The barricade situation for my gun is complicated. I think it is due to my grip.

When you zero at 50y the bullet is barely .5" above line of sight at 25y, but that is when I shoot prone. I actually zero 1" - 1 1/2" high at 50y when just sighting in. In a match I find that the gun will then centre the group, or more likely I centre the group. So when attached to the barricade the gun returns to it's correct zero. Therefore actually shooting high. SO if high at 50y you will be high at 35y so I come down the X ring.

I will PM you a full explanation of the problems.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Dave,

That diagram is correct now! :rolleyes: The target spacing is 6' apart edge-to-edge, and 3' from the centerline of the barricade to the target's edge. A good idea to post the different event diagrams. It'll be a help for new shooters and ROs.

Alan~^~

Edited by Alan550
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Now to throw a spanner in that theory. TGO shot a 480-35X at the 2005 Cup without touching the barricade at all. :ph34r:

I know next to nothing about this topic --- I've shot less than 20 club matches, but since I shoot other games a lot that don't involve touching the barricade, it made sense to me to just pretend that the barricade didn't exist. If I managed to shoot this type of match on a regular basis, I'd have to experiment --- but for the multi-discipline competitors who are dabbling in Bianchi, this seems to be one of those events where you can use what you already know, at least until you get really serious about it....

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Barricade shooting with OPEN gun for the "other hand" side draw for me is dependent on what grips and what scope I used. The orginal generation HOLOsight was a nice "handle" to draw by, whereas a C-MORE would not be. Also the type of grips one chooses may make a difference whether it is "friendly" to draw with a grip, grip then transfer to the other hand. One just has to try it. I find that I need to remember to hold a tad high, maybe an inch, at 10 yds then center at 15 & 25 yds, and sometimes a slight bias low at 35 yds, especially on the non strong hand side. For me on the barricade, I find too much support hand grip and I milk the shots inward, too much grip with the shooting hand and I milk the shots outward. Like Kevin said the barricade is a technique event as much maybe more than a shooting event.

The other transfer time that is most likely encountered is the WHO string of the practical. Similar thoughts to above likely apply.

With the Production or Metallic gun the barricade is a real challenge. On the stong side I draw and place the support hand against the barricade at all distances. The placement is contact against the barricade (hopefully) with the hand contacting the barricade with the meat of the knuckles on the face of the barricade and the flesh of the fingers along the sides. Yes it hurts a bit, but it is basically PPC style and it works. The "other side" is a work in progress, but basically I let the knuckles to the first joint from the knuckles contact the barricade. The gun must have a slight cant to accomplish this. I do this also at all distances. The results vary, signifcantly as the barricade is a real challenge with a Metallic or Production gun under the time limits allowed.

MJ

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  • 3 weeks later...
Dot oscillation?? When I practiced at home with a barricade it was fairly stable---the cup barricades are a different animal with a lot of vibration from each shot. What’s your method on dealing with this issue. Thx

Our barricades here being all steel have a good bit of oscillation in them as well. A well built wood barricade may have 1 bigger deflection, but the wood dampens any further vibration and settles faster. For the steel ones here, Im still learning, but it seem you need to try to crush the barricade and the gun with the support hand...... Squeeze i until it actually hurts, and then squeeze harder. I have figured out that if i can lock my support elbow, and put a bit of forward pressure on the barricade, it seems to dampen the oscillations faster and the dot stops.

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Dot oscillation?? When I practiced at home with a barricade it was fairly stable---the cup barricades are a different animal with a lot of vibration from each shot. What’s your method on dealing with this issue. Thx

YRMV but for me with a revo, you must get as quick a mount as is possible, with minimal fumbling to find the target center, then immediately start working the trigger. As you are working the trigger you are fine tuning the "dot" to the desired area where by you want the shot to break. After a very slight "follow through" repeat the process. It is important to understand, AND ACCEPT, that our hold area differs. Of course we all want X's, or 10's. But for some of us depending on our equipment, our skill and time allocated for practice, the best we can hope for may be 8's or better. If one's skill ability is 8's and 10's don't force the X's, they will take care of themselves. If you force an outcome better than what your skill set is likely to be, then you will likely not get the X, but will certainly get the 5 or worse, run out of time.

For tha auto, as I have been known to say you must have the balls to pause! In other words as mentioned on the revo comment above, acquire as quick a mount as is possible, with the landing zone as precise as is possible to target center. Pause slightly to reaffirm the grip and mount, and center the dot in "your" aiming area, then press the trigger. When the shot breaks the dot will jump around pretty violently, but if your grip and mount are solid the dot movement will be pretty consistent. Practice, learning and consistency in grip, mount, support and also barricade structure will enable you to reduce the dot movement, but it will still be present. The key is consistency, repeatability, then it is easier to cope with the movement, and learn to master it. You just need to pause, long enough to let it settle down, before the next shot is fired. If you don't pause, you will be surprised how bad the shots can be, especially at 25 & 35 yards.

I would say that 8 out of ten times when a less than acceptable shot is fired on the barricade during a string, the culprit started with a poor grip from holster, or during exchange, or from a bad mount at the barricade. The poor grip or exchange will lead in many cases to a poor mount, which leads to anxiety and bad shots, or excess time. For this reason, personally, I think the draw is as important during the barricade event than most of the NRA AP events. Time is so limited, so many things have to happen, and precision is required.

Hope this helps!

MJ

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