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So You Want a Sub 2# Glock Trigger


Joe D
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Hey Joe,

Why are the lightened steel strikers preferred over the titanium ones?

Is Lightning Strike the only brand available?

Thank you for the valuable Glock info you share.

Warm regards,

Dagz

The lightened steel are preferred because they are more durable than the titanium. I have not experienced it , but have heard that titanium are prone to breaking tips off. As far as I know lightening strike is the only company making them.

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The steel is more durable. I did break the tip off of a steel one several years ago at about 30,000 rounds. LS replaced it free. I have not had any problems with the new gold colored ones. The one that broke was the old black style. LS is the only one making a lwt striker that I know of. You can lighten the stock one, but it is, IMO, not worth the effort.

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The steel is more durable. I did break the tip off of a steel one several years ago at about 30,000 rounds. LS replaced it free. I have not had any problems with the new gold colored ones. The one that broke was the old black style. LS is the only one making a lwt striker that I know of. You can lighten the stock one, but it is, IMO, not worth the effort.

Thank you very much Joe!

I just need to hear that from you before I order one.

By the way, is the titanium striker safety plunger worth getting? I read somewhere the Vanek tigger kit has an "enhanced/modified" firing pin safety plunger. What's your take on this?

Again, Thanks!

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Joe I would first like to say thanks for sharing all your trigger knowledge with us. I am not quite ready, mostly due to lack of time and tools, to attempt this one but it is peaking my interest. That being said I have done the .25 job and a LWD 3.5 connector. I keep reading about changing out strikers, striker springs, and trigger springs. What does each of these do to the trigger pull/action. My guess would be lighter striker spring would lighten the trigger but I believe from what I have read to also get a heavier trigger spring, the 6lb wolf I believe (helps the reset?).

Just confirming and asking to see what this changes.

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I don't use the heavy trigger return spring. Never found a need to. The lwt striker spring will take weight out of the pull. You will get an occasional light strike if you use the stock striker. I use the Lightning Strike steel striker. I have never had a light strike with it. I use WSP, CCI and Federal primers.

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By the way, is the titanium striker safety plunger worth getting? I read somewhere the Vanek tigger kit has an "enhanced/modified" firing pin safety plunger. What's your take on this?

Again, Thanks!

The Vanek safety plunger is a Glock OEM button that he "melted." He takes the angles off the end that sticks out of the slide, and makes it round.

I've tried to replicate the job by holding a stone to the plunger chucked into a drill, but I didn't get very far. I think he must use a lathe.

I dunno about the titanium plungers. I hope that are rounded, and the weight reduction is not the only improvement.

Edited by Suburban Commando
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What does "melted" mean? I have come across this term multiple times ... I got college... but... I don't get this! lol

One other thought... has anyone tried to lighten a stock striker by drilling out the center - down the center axis of it? I was thinking about that as I was taking a dremel & cut-off wheel to make grooves in one once. I don't have a drill press so I have not tried it but it would seem that the structural integrity would hold up better then the ones with groves milled in it aka the Rhea mods.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Joe

Thank you for posting this info!

Before doing the modifications, 5.6lb's trigger pull (out of the box factory pull)

After doing everything but the light weight striker (on backorder) my trigger pull is 2.3lb's.

And I still have to do a polish job, so that might take a bit more off.

No problems at all with the install other then having to fiddle with the distance to bend the arm on trigger bar 3 times to get it where I wanted it.

Its so nice to have a true single action Glock with no takeup!!!!!

I owe you a beer.

Thanks again,

Kyle

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Joe

Thank you for posting this info!

Before doing the modifications, 5.6lb's trigger pull (out of the box factory pull)

After doing everything but the light weight striker (on backorder) my trigger pull is 2.3lb's.

And I still have to do a polish job, so that might take a bit more off.

No problems at all with the install other then having to fiddle with the distance to bend the arm on trigger bar 3 times to get it where I wanted it.

Its so nice to have a true single action Glock with no takeup!!!!!

I owe you a beer.

Thanks again,

Kyle

Seiko, did you move the trigger pad. Also, how much difference did bending the arm make.

Thanks, Rik

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DrKyle1,

I've gone thru the trouble of lightening the stock striker. I drilled all the way down the length to the head and then I milled a slot in the head and on the part the trigger bar hits. I basically copied what Lightning strikes did on the titanium unit. It's a lot of work. You really need carbide tools to do it. The outer case of the material is really hard. Drills don't last long even when you get past the outer case. The net result was a little lighter than what you could buy from Lightening Strikes. Unless you have the tools, it's really not worth the effort.

Joe D,

Do you sell a modified trigger?

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Seiko, did you move the trigger pad. Also, how much difference did bending the arm make.

Thanks, Rik

Yes I did.

Bending the arm just takes the takeup out of the trigger. I don't think it improves the pull (maybe a bit of perceived?).

Be careful when drawing your gun!

No first stage, light second stage, no safety. Yikes!

Rule III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET :cheers:

This gun will be a "range gun" that I did it to. Not anything that I'd carry or use for home defense.

Probably start using this for pin shoots to blow peoples minds.

A mirror polish took about a half pound off a stock 5.5lb. trigger. You'll only get a fraction of that half pound if you're down to 2.3lb. already.

Yeah I figure it would take me down to 2lb with the polish job and the lighter striker. This was done to a glock 20 I bought a few years ago and never shot. So it might come down a bit after that first few thousand rounds.

I'm actually happy with where its at now. Its weird after shooting 1911's all these years to have a glock with the same trigger pull. Well weight wise anyway, still a very different feel to it like a upward feel instead of a straight back in the 1911.

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A word of caution guys. If done properly all of the safeties will still work. Don't bend the return spring tab too far forward or you will defeat the striker safety. You want the "nub" on the top of the trigger bar just starting to touch the striker safety plunger.

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Anybody have any tips on drilling the new hole in the trigger bar? I've spent a lot of time trying, and I only have a shallow divot to show for it.

I annealed the steel, and I'm using a 5/64" ACE cobalt hard metal bit. I tried running the drill press as slow as it goes (500rpm, I think). When I saw that wasn't doing much good, I tried running the drill faster. I still have little more than a shallow divot.

I've drilled new holes for the trigger spring before, which was tough, but this is friggin ridiculous.

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