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More General Reloading Tips And Tricks


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You guys really need to listen to Brian on the Hornady One Shot. You don't have to clean it off and it improves feeding. Also, it's great on rifle cases, no mess and you don't get dents on the shoulder like the greasier compounds.

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Next newbie question. I got the XL 650, with case feeder. I got the Hornady One Shot. After reading this thread I am ready to put the brass in a box, in a towel or in a plastic bag and squirt it with the case lube. But wait! How about dumping a few hundred rounds in the case feeder, turning it on and giving it a shot while they tumble?

Thanks in advance,

Dale

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AikiDale

I add my lube in the casefeeder just as you described. BUT...I use RCBS case lube and have a gummy black build up all over the inside of my case feeder. That might be the RCBS stuff or it might be the application method. Either way it is part of my SOP because it's the easiest way I've found.

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Hi all,

leave the lube on the cases! Thats the answer Heckler&Koch gave to me. I asked them whether to remove the lube or to leave it where it is. So here is their reply:

"Sehr geehrter Herr XXXX,

Sie können die Patronenhülsen gefettet lassen. Der dadurch geringfügig erhöhte Druck auf den Stoßboden

und die somit erhöhte Verschlußrücklaufgeschwindigkeit ist, zumindest bei unseren Produkten, vernachlässigbar. Gefettete bzw. geölte Patronenhülsen haben den Vorteil, daß der Ausziehwiderstand gleichmäßiger ist und aufgrund dessen die Treffleistung verbessert wird."

Where is Detlev? Please translate the H&K´s reply! It´s too difficult for my poor English and I don´t want to make mistakes!

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After reading this thread I am ready to put the brass in a box, in a towel or in a plastic bag and squirt it with the case lube. But wait! How about dumping a few hundred rounds in the case feeder, turning it on and giving it a shot while they tumble?

A lot of folks do just that. I do the extra step with the box/towel so that I get another chance to inspect the brass. (which is important to me...most of my reloading is with 40's at Major velocity)

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A lot of folks do just that.  I do the extra step with the box/towel so that I get another chance to inspect the brass.

I intend to take your advice from here on in Flexmoney. Having inspected the brass as I separated it, sorta, and again as I removed it from the tumbler, sorta, imagine my chagrine when my press came crashing down on a 9mm inside a .40 inside a .45 case........ :wacko:

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  • 4 months later...

Prep-Sol is great for cleaning loaded rounds, just a capful in corncob media and about 10 minutes. Also works great for cleaning really nasty gun parts, however you should use it outside for this purpose. I done it once inside and got drain bamage.

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  • 1 month later...

Interesting idea using dryer sheets to pick up the dust.

To extend the life of my tumbling media, I use my ShopVac to remove the dust when it starts to get bad. To do this, simply empty and wipe out the vacuum container and clean/replace the filter. Then suck all the media out of your tumbler bowl. As the media rattles its way through the hose, the dust is knocked free and collected on the filter while the media drops to the bottom.

Shoot straight!

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  • 7 months later...
I don't think I've mentioned this yet...

Use an anti-static dryer sheet in your tumbler to help reduce dust.

I use "used" COSTCO baby wipes. The first use is at the range to keep my hands clean after picking up brass or before getting in the car as I'm leaving. Then I toss one or two in the tumbler with the brass to be cleaned. It does a wonderful job of trapping the tumbler dust.

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  • 8 months later...
Patches,

Thanks, I don't know how that got in there.

shred, 

I thought about including that solution in the spiel, but decided I'd wait until someone asked. Actually, I don't use the Dillon lube because I don't like to waste time tumbling it off. I use (I think Hornady makes it) One Shot case lube. You just leave it on the cases. Actually, it may improve feeding; I don't really care because I never have to mess with it. But, if did need to remove the case lube after loading, I tumble it off by adding about a capful of Prep Sol to the corncob media. You can get Prep Sol at an auto body supply store. It's a brand name, so if they don't have it  - it's the cleaner body shops use to remove absolutely everything before they paint. It leaves no residue whatsoever.

be

Brian,

Is Prep-Sol a liquid or a powder that you mix with water? In my attempt to find some online I ran across a PrepSol powder?

Thanks,

louielouie

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NOTE from moderator: This thread was spun-off from benos' Which Dillon topic. Please forgive the "holes" in the discussion.

One question (that probably doesn't belong in this thread)-- How do y'all get the case lube off the loaded rounds?  I used to tumble them, but then I started using JHP's, and got cleaning media stuck in the hollowpoints, which would then extract itself on being loaded into a magazine or the chamber or somewhere equally irritating.

- Roy

Check this website. http://www.black-walnuts.com/page.asp?cate...=productlisting I have purchased walnut from them in the 12/20 size. I did not see it listed, but some time ago I got some corncob media from them that was extremely fine, much finer than normal corn cob media. I have to run it for awhile, but it really puts the shine to cases.

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The Prep Sol (no idea if the spelling is even close) I'm talking about is a liquid, and the only place you'll probably find it is at a paint and body supply shop. That is a brand name, however, so if they don't have that particular brand I'm sure they'll know what to substitute. It's a degreaser, that's usually used as the last thing you wipe down the car with before painting.

be

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I "recycle" ones previously used in the dryer. I imagine new ones would work better.

And ammo comes out of the tumbler with a fresh smell as opposed to metal and polish :lol::lol::lol:

Vince

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The Prep Sol (no idea if the spelling is even close) I'm talking about is a liquid, and the only place you'll probably find it is at a paint and body supply shop. That is a brand name, however, so if they don't have that particular brand I'm sure they'll know what to substitute. It's a degreaser, that's usually used as the last thing you wipe down the car with before painting.

be

HERE'S what Brian's talking about (PDF file).

Ed

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The Prep Sol (no idea if the spelling is even close) I'm talking about is a liquid, and the only place you'll probably find it is at a paint and body supply shop. That is a brand name, however, so if they don't have that particular brand I'm sure they'll know what to substitute. It's a degreaser, that's usually used as the last thing you wipe down the car with before painting.

be

HERE'S what Brian's talking about (PDF file).

Ed

Thanks Ed, for the Dupont Sheets. You would not believe how I looked to try and find the MSDS on this online. You saved me the trouble.

Brian,

Thanks for the info and I am going to try it out.

louielouie

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The Prep Sol (no idea if the spelling is even close) I'm talking about is a liquid, and the only place you'll probably find it is at a paint and body supply shop. That is a brand name, however, so if they don't have that particular brand I'm sure they'll know what to substitute. It's a degreaser, that's usually used as the last thing you wipe down the car with before painting.

be

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

To Brian or anyone who wants to answer one last question.

Does this (below) sound like the same thing?

"PRE Painting Prep removes grease, oil, wax, and polish. PRE Painting Prep is a blend of solvents that may attack plastic, so test first. One can treats 20 sq ft. On waxed areas, or surfaces that may have silicones, more than one cleaning may be necessary. Works better than lacquer thinner, which can leave a film behind that can compromise paint adhesion. Use to prep for all Eastwood paints, including our exhaust manifold paints. Use in a well ventilated area, or wear a respirator ..."

many thanks,

louielouie

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  • 1 month later...

Buy some of the NON FLAMMABLE Brake Cleaner from the local Auto parts store or Auto department of the WhicheverMart.

Buy Shop rags, (red ones) or terry towels too. In a pinch, old t-shirts work.

Give loaded case-lubed rounds, brake cleaner, rags and ammo boxes to slave labor aka son who wants to shoot.

Show said slave labor how to spray cleaner on rag, wipe off rounds, mark and categorize into ammo boxes according to case headstamp.

Go reload next batch. Make note to teach slave labor to reload and take over task of at least reloading HIS ammo.

Remember to take said slave labor to next match and watch his enthusiasm grow with each stage.

Find said slave labor to be mucho cooperative at next reloading session.

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  • 2 months later...

After handling my reoads there are some fingerprint stains on the bullets and brass. I had heard something of tumbling bullets after they are loaded. Does anyone have any experience doing this or have any thoughts on the idea? :unsure: I am just wondering if there would be any benefit to this or just a waste of time?!

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