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Rifle Case Lube - Whats Best And Easiest.

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I like the Hornady One Shot also have never stuck one with it either.

I have to jump on this wagon also.

Lubeing? I just stand the cases on the base, on some brown paper, all in a row and a light spray on one side then the other, making sure that I get a little inside the case neck, I can't remember when the lst time I had a stuck case. For Rifle I load 30-06, 308, .223

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I should have clarified. I use One Shot on all pistol rounds and my 308 brass. On my 223 high volume 3-Gun loading, it's with Dillon's lube.

Rich

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Yet again, I'm reviving an old post.

I just bought some Cabela's case lube (had a gift card, and thought it might help). I have carbide dies, but read recently on Brian's forum that it'd help, so I bought it.

Does anyone have any experience with it? Is die cleaning necessary, too?

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The cheapest and is easily pure lanolin / 94%+alcohol in a spray bottle mixed four parts alcohol to one part lanolin ,or you can mix it leaner or heavier if you want . two shots over a gal tub with 100 cases ,let it flash off and your good to go

Edited by shriner

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The cheapest and is easily pure lanolin / 94%+alcohol in a spray bottle mixed four parts alcohol to one part lanolin ,or you can mix it leaner or heavier if you want . two shots over a gal tub with 100 cases ,let it flash off and your good to go

This is what I use with 99% alcohol. Honestly it isn't that much cheaper than the dillon bottles new but it stocks longer in my shop.

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it is OK to tumble completed rounds in corn cob without any danger? Can the pointed tips of bullets strike primers?

I have played with a lot of old Military ammo over the years and have yet to have a round go off in the tumbler. If it does it is more of a brass fire cracker and will not launch like a bullet from a chamber. To be on the safe side I alway tumble the anchient ammo in the garage.

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One Shot is convenient and easy to clean off. Not recommended for rifle, but many people use it with success. I only use one-shot on pistol brass sized in carbide dies that has been wet-tumbled. Range brass goes in unlubed because the carbon acts as a lube. (carbide only) Steel dies need lube always

In my opinion, Dillon Lube is probably the best for rifle cases on progressive presses and high-volume. Imperial sizing wax is best for single-stage and precision rifle. All can be removed with corn cob in a tumbler for 10-15 minutes. (loaded or unloaded)

Do you wet tumble at all? If you do, you need to perform one step prior to tumbling after sizing with Dillon lube. (It's what I use for the progressive stuff) Dump all your processed cases in a bucket with hot water and some type of degreaser such as Krud Kutter concentrate or similar. Just swish it around and then put it in the tumbler. If you skip this, your brass will come out black as all the cleaned residue will redeposit on the cases. It's messy as hell.

This is what I do for 5.56 and 300AAC:

1. Put 200-500 semi clean cases in a plastic tote, and spray Dillon Lube 2 squirts, shake the tote a few times, 2 more squirts, and let sit for 30 minutes for the alcohol to evaporate. (if you size them while wet, you will get dents on the shoulders)

2. I now process a large batch of cases (1k-5k) on 1050 with RT1500. (universal decapper, swager, RT1500 and size die, and mandrel expander all on one head) Same will work with 650, 550, or other progressives, minus the swaging....

3. Finished brass goes into a cardboard box while I finish the batch. (the cardboard will absorb some of the lube)

4. Dump all processed brass in a hot water/KrudKutter mix bucket and shake it around a bit

5. Dump 1000 or so into a wet tumbler with 10lbs of pins, run it for 2 hours

6. Clean brass is dried for 1 hour in a dehydrator

7. Anneal everything on a Giraud or similar annealer

If dry tumbling, skip steps 4,5,6. If you anneal, then you need to have clean brass, so you gotta clean it first. Otherwise just load and tumble the loaded rounds for 15-20 minutes. (don't leave unattended overnight, etc) However, I noticed when I skipped the cleaning prior to loading, that lubed cases would sometimes cause the powder to bridge at the mouth and cause a mess.

Sorry to derail this thread....Took me a while to get things right and made a lot of mistakes before settling on something that works for me. YMMV.

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I'm now using 1/2" squirt of Lee case lube and thin it with 99% rubbing alcohol in a pump bottle for rifle.

Lay brass on an old cookie sheet and spray. Size right away or later.

Edited by RePete

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Do you wet tumble at all? If you do, you need to perform one step prior to tumbling after sizing with Dillon lube. (It's what I use for the progressive stuff) Dump all your processed cases in a bucket with hot water and some type of degreaser such as Krud Kutter concentrate or similar. Just swish it around and then put it in the tumbler. If you skip this, your brass will come out black as all the cleaned residue will redeposit on the cases. It's messy as hell.

Hmm, I process all my rifle brass (sizing and trimming) using homemade case lube (10:1 of 99% isopropyl alcohol:liquid lanolin) and I go straight from processing to wet tumbling (with wash/wax and Lemishine) and I don't have any issues, my brass comes out perfect.

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Strange thing, I started wet tumbling without removing the lube and all my brass would come out black, with a fine coating of either carbon, residue, or graphite. Felt like fine graphite powder. It would easily wipe off, showing the bright brass underneath, but it was a mess. I used the same recipe every time, (6 second squirt of dawn, 1/4tsp of lemi shine) As soon as I removed the lube via a dip in hot water and Krud Kutter, my brass comes out like new. The dillon lube dries very sticky, and is not water soluble, at least not when the water turns cold after 2 hours in the tumbler. All the gunk that came off the cases got redeposited on the brass as a fine, pain in the ass powder.

Not sure why. I don't skip the pre-wash step anymore, for fear of it happening again. That residue permanently stained my light kitchen counters, cupboards, the tumbler drum, towels, refrigerator, everything I touched. (cause it was all over my hands) Wife was not happy at all. ( I tumble in the kitchen)

So not sure what everyone else is doing differently with the Dillon lube (or other Lanolin/Alcohol lubes) perhaps I need to add something to the water? I'm using the Frankford Arsenal Rotary tumbler, with the rubber liner. Perhaps the black stuff is hammered rubber being deposited?

I couldn't find any posts online about this issue, so I assumed everyone was removing the lube prior to wet tumbling....

Edited by chrishoesel

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Do you wet tumble at all? If you do, you need to perform one step prior to tumbling after sizing with Dillon lube. (It's what I use for the progressive stuff) Dump all your processed cases in a bucket with hot water and some type of degreaser such as Krud Kutter concentrate or similar. Just swish it around and then put it in the tumbler. If you skip this, your brass will come out black as all the cleaned residue will redeposit on the cases. It's messy as hell.

Hmm, I process all my rifle brass (sizing and trimming) using homemade case lube (10:1 of 99% isopropyl alcohol:liquid lanolin) and I go straight from processing to wet tumbling (with wash/wax and Lemishine) and I don't have any issues, my brass comes out perfect.

Maybe I should try the carwash/wax? Perhaps it has an emulsifier in it that breaks down the lube? If I can skip the rinse step, it would help out a lot time-wise. I thought the Dawn would help break down the oils in the lube, but apparently it's not enough. I've wanted to try the wash/wax to reduce water spots as well. Which detergent do you use?

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You know Chris, I blame you for my new problem. :goof:

I have been processing a bunch of rifle brass recently and found that I had a similar issue to what you describe above and wasn't sure what was causing it (more lube being used for rifle brass, not using hot water to tumble, the car wash/wax product I was using rather than Dawn). I didn't have this issue before so I was confused. I figured using extra lube was a contributing factor as my first batch was fine but the second batch suffered some (buildup in the barrel and on the pins of the lube and/or wax product). So I cleaned the barrel and pins and the third batch was better but not as good as the past. I too am using the Franford Arsenal wet tumbler.

I cleaned the barrel and pins again very well. I have now tried rinsing the brass with hot water and a cleaning agent before tumbling rifle brass that has been well lubed. I have also gone back to using 1 TBS of Dawn with 1/2 TSP of Lemishine. My last two batches were quite good so I am going to stick with that process for now.

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For rifle: Lanolin/Iso homebrew - Works great, I dont trust OneStuck for doing cases that are going to size hard like machine gun fired .308

For pistol: OneShot - I use this even though I have carbide dies. Makes my LnL run smoother, it wont mess up the powder, and I dont have to tumble it off.

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Use more Dawn. If it is too diluted it won't cut the case lube. Try about an ounce in a Frankford wet tumbler. I've tried everything you have ever heard of and now I just use Dawn and Hot Water. With any of the acidic mixes you can only leave the brass in it so long and then it starts to turn pink. With the Dawn and water you can run it for awhile, let it sit overnight and then run a little the next day to stir up the sediment and then rinse. It won't turn the brass pink or any other unwanted effect.

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I believe the hot water may do more to remove the lanolin than the dishwashing liquid. I may have to process a batch of brass and split the batch in half and try Dawn and cold water on one half and compare it to the other half using just hot water.

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I too swear on Dillon case lube. I don't know what the cost difference is between it and Hornady that some use. Doesn't matter the cost to me as I've found Dillon to work the best so I stay with it.

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I used the RCBS case lube and like it at the time. That was till I ordered my 650. Thought I would give the Dillon lube a try while I was receiving the 650 order and like it better than the RCBS case lube.

HotRod

Edited by HotRod61

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I use the Frankford Arsenal lube when I load 6.5 Creedmoor match ammo. I put 50 to 100 pcs in a Zip Lock bag, spray about three sprays in three, and gently roll them around. I keep the bag rubber-banded to the side of the lube bottle, so I don't go through all my wife's 1-gallon freezer bags. :-)

I believe the Frankford Arsenal lube is the same as the Dillon, but I'm not 100% sure. I do usually spray one spritz of it inside the die before I start, making sure to get the expander ball lubed up before I start, since the one thing that does not get lubed in my above method is the inside of the case neck.

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This is what I do for 5.56 and 300AAC:

1. Put 200-500 semi clean cases in a plastic tote, and spray Dillon Lube 2 squirts, shake the tote a few times, 2 more squirts, and let sit for 30 minutes for the alcohol to evaporate. (if you size them while wet, you will get dents on the shoulders)

Hey Chris - What are you thinking is "semi clean cases"? I'd love to give this a try.

Is there a pre-wash step that might get a bunch of store-bought cases "semi-clean"? I'm thinking this Iosso Brass Cleaner to get bulk range cases clean before using your process http://www.cabelas.com/product/Iosso-Case-Cleaner-Kit/727251.uts

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I'm processing .223 and 300BO by the 10's of thousands.

One Shot is great for straight wall but not as good a lube as lanolin and way too expensive in volume. I use Dillon spray but lately have been mixing my own.

I'll put 2 handfuls of 223 cased in a rectangular cake tray then spray and mix by hand. It's a quick operation and squeezing the cased through your fingers does a better job spreading the lube compared to using a bag, IMO.Two cake trays will fill a hopper on 1050 and is a good lot size.

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As far as case lube goes, I needed to buy something else, spend more money :roflol:, to get free freight on an order. Didn't really need anything so I threw in a spray can of Lyman Quick Slick. I asked on here if anyone had ever used it and received no reply.

Anyway, I put brass in a gallon bag and give it one spray and roll it around for awhile and it works like a champ. On .223 or pistol.

I've also got the homemade Lanolin with alcohol (1 to 10 ratio) which works quite well.

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I've reloaded tens of thousands of 223 and 308 cases using Hornady One Shot and I have never, ever had one get stuck. I dump the brass in a ziplock, sort of lay the bag flat and spread the brass, and spray the crap out of it.

I bet those who have stuck a case with it are trying to use the bare minimum lube. Big mistake.

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The only problem with using too much lube is putting dimples in the shoulders of cases as it builds up in the die.

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True, but you gotta be using a metric crap ton for that to happen, and never cleaning the inside of the die.

Besides, minor dents and dimples get fixed by 60,000 psi the moment the primer gets hit.

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"Besides, minor dents and dimples get fixed by 60,000 psi the moment the primer gets hit." :roflol: :roflol: :roflol:

That is certainly true !!!

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