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Accessorizing A Rem-1100


JDBraddy
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I just picked up a used Rem-1100, and want to set it up to pull double duty shooting the occasional shotgun stage at my local club matches, and as my home defence gun. I want it fast, reliable, and pleasant shooting, without investing a fortune. Advice?

Edited by JDBraddy
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Add a DMW EZ-Loader (Gunsmith Install Recommended).

Get a Choate extension magazine tube:

http://www.riflestock.com/catalog_page_det...mp;NewProduct=0

Get some accessory choke tubes (Remchokes) so you have an IC, IM and M available. I use a Mod almost exclusively for competition, but still change up once in a while when the different pattern will provide an advantage. The Mod shoots slugs great and delivers authority on falling steel. The IC kills clays better.

Get some replacement gas system O-Rings from http://www.ericwesselman.com/ and lube up the gas system with your favorite detergent motor oil and change the O-rings regularly. Use 3 to 3.25 Dram loads in shotshells and reduced recoil slugs and buckshot (Federal is my preferred reduced slug and buck). This is the recommended care and feeding regimen to keep a Remmie running strong.

Disassembly instructions and a parts diagram can be found here: http://www.3gunrules.com/documents/multi-gun-info/manuals/

The 1100 and the 11-87 are almost identical in disassembly/maintenance procedures.

Not much else needed to make it run.

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Get some replacement gas system O-Rings from http://www.ericwesselman.com/ and lube up the gas system with your favorite detergent motor oil and change the O-rings regularly. Use 3 to 3.25 Dram loads in shotshells and reduced recoil slugs and buckshot (Federal is my preferred reduced slug and buck). This is the recommended care and feeding regimen to keep a Remmie running strong.

Huh?

I've seen this noted in other comments and it just doesn't make any sense to me.

I shoot an 11-87 for Trap and I never, NEVER lube the gas system. It runs bone dry.

I think I've replaced the o-ring once, when it broke, taking it off during cleaning.

The only times I've ever tried putting any lube at all on it, I've put a very light coating of rem-oil on and watched it gum up inside of 100 rounds!

I've run easily 15,000 rounds thru it. Everything from superlight 7/8 oz loads of 16 grain Bullseye all the way up to heavy 1 1/8 oz 27 yard loads without ever having a failure that I couldn't directly attribute to not cleaning it after the last 1000 rounds.

A weekend Trap match is anywhere from 400 to 600 rounds and I don't ususally clean it till after the match is over.

This isn't just what I do, either. Most of the Trap shooters I've spoken with do not put any lube on the gas system, either. I'm very surprised to hear people here saying that it's a good idea.

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BBunin,

That is an interesting observation. My brother has used one to hunt with forever. Never cleans it. Always runs. light loads, heavy loads .go figure.

I think that it must have something to do with the fact that in 3 gun, we are not standing still pointing at a target very often. It is moving, off balance, odd angles. I also think that the hanging a mag tube extension filled with 7-10 rounds may have some effect.

All I can tell you is on my 1100, it is run clean & wet.

Edited by warpspeed
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Try running 24 rds in about 45 seconds thur your trap gun, wait 1/2 hr and do it again, but with slugs this time. Get it so hot you cant touch the barrel. Three gun does things to shotgun that Rem never even imagined. Clean and wet with new rings often. 3 gunners learned that the hard way.-------------Larry

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Dang' right!

The recoil reduction you get when running reduced loads (3-3.25 Dram and low recoil Buck/Slugs) doesn't work the gas system like full house loads do. Trap loads aren't as hefty as hunting loads, but stouter than skeet stuff and we run more towards skeet loads in 3gun for recoil reduction and fast multiple target acquisition reasons.

When the gas system gets full heat, a Remmy can be run bone dry, have a crappy O-ring in it and it will still run fine. Get it really, really hot AND grungy like Larry notes then put reduced recoil fodder in it, you better run a lubed up gas system and have a new O-ring there if you want your 2k investment in traveling to that big 3gun match to not get flushed down the you know what when your shotgun pukes in the middle of your first stage.

Yeah, I stand 100% behind my advice, just like 95%+ of the folks who run these things sucessfully in practical shooting style competition do ;-)

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From my Briley built 1100, here's what I'd do (since it started out as a used 1100).

Bigger mag tube (Briley's is sweet but Choate's will do)

DMW Easy Loader (have a gunsmith install it...Shawn Carlock for this one or Briley)

Cut the barrel down and tweak the forcing cone

Get a full set of chokes but IC, Mod and Rifled/Slug at a minimum

As for sights, it's pretty tough to beat a Williams rear peep and a Tru-Glo front.

As for maintenance, there's four big things to remember to keep 1100's running happy. First, keep it clean. The cleaner the better. Auto parts Brake Cleaner is great and it's cheap. Second, scrub out the gas ports. Briley's gas port brush does this quite well and fast. Third, change your gas rings often. About every 6 months is fine. Lastly, lube it lightly. A light spray of Corrosion-X in the action and trigger group goes a long way.

I never did lube my gas rings, and really don't see a huge point in it, but if it works, then who's to say it doesn't work. Try it out. My Remmy runs flawless but just am too much in love with Benelli's.

Rich

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Lubing the gas system with "Detergent" motor oil does several things. First and foremost, it prevents carbonization on the metal and lets it be cleaned with a shop rag by just wiping. Huge difference when all you have to do to clean it is wipe it off and re-lube it compared to dry carbonized crud that needs scrubbing/scraping and solvents/steel wool work.

Second plus to a wet gas system is the extra level of reliability you get due to reduced friction of the bolt carrier compared to dry, carbon covered parts sliding over each other. Wet gas rings stay smooth and pliable longer, they also seal better than dry ones do.

The trigger group should "always" be run wet per Remingtons maintenance recommendations. I BrakeKleen it, dip the whole thing in a tub of motor oil and fling the excess off before putting it back in. I do this every 2-3 gas system cleanings. I wipe and re-lube the gas system before every match, or after 200ish rounds has passed. I replace the O-rings every time I clean/lube the trigger group. Keep the inside of the magazine tube, the mag spring and the follower dry and clean at all times.

I almost never clean the bbl anymore. I just run a Tico tool with some motor oil on it through it before it gets stuffed into the safe. I think I have cleaned the bbl to bare metal twice in 15+ years, then just stopped bothering a few years back after realizing it really just doesn't matter as long as it doesn't rust inside.

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Sounds great, simple, and inexpensive. I looked long and hard at a new Benelli M4 before buying the Remington, but just couldn't bring myself to justify the extra $1,100.00 price difference. This gun looks like it was a closet queen, it was clean, well lubed, still had light tool marks visible on the bolt face, and all the blueing on the mag tube where the bolt carrier slides back and forth. I has a 28" fixed choke, ribbed barrel with single front bead. I dropped it off at the gunsmiths with instructions to install an EZ-loader, mag extention / barrel clamp. The wood was in good shape, and I'd like to keep it that way, so I also told him to order and install a set of synthetic furniture on it. I'll set the wood aside for now, so it stays nice. He estimated about a week turn-around. I want to shoot it some, see how it swings, what pattern it shoots, and how it functions with my handloads, before deciding on shortening the barrel, adding sights, or installing chokes. I live just up the road from the NSSA/NSCSA headquarters, so will probably wait untill I can catch Briley or the other big name smiths/vendors when they come out to get that kind of work done.

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Ifn'ya live near Briley, definitely have them handle the bbl work and take a look at their screw in chokes. The have a knurled part that extends and allows them to be changed by hand and you can check that they are tight real easily too. I really like the Briley chokes and the work they do on Remmy barrels is first rate. Have them sweeten up the trigger a tad too, you will appreciate it when shooting slugs for acccuracy in IPSC competition.

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I don't think there's an absolute rule about wet/dry..

2 of the guys in the bunch I usually shoot with, run thier 1100's or 11/87's dry for 3 Gun and both are darn good at it.

I tried it that way with mine, it didn't like it, some just seem to like to run wet, some dry.

See what works for your loads..

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A bigger bolt handle is a "must"!!! I can't think of a better way to hit props and induce malfunctions, snag on gear, and in general be much less than handy than a small factory piece. I will say that the bigger ones are easier to find once they fly off the gun, but since the "small" factory one doesn't do this you don't have to look for it. :D Hey it,s America...bigger has to be better!! KURTM

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Get some replacement gas system O-Rings from http://www.ericwesselman.com/ and lube up the gas system with your favorite detergent motor oil and change the O-rings regularly. Use 3 to 3.25 Dram loads in shotshells and reduced recoil slugs and buckshot (Federal is my preferred reduced slug and buck). This is the recommended care and feeding regimen to keep a Remmie running strong.

Huh?

I've seen this noted in other comments and it just doesn't make any sense to me.

I shoot an 11-87 for Trap and I never, NEVER lube the gas system. It runs bone dry.

I think I've replaced the o-ring once, when it broke, taking it off during cleaning.

The only times I've ever tried putting any lube at all on it, I've put a very light coating of rem-oil on and watched it gum up inside of 100 rounds!

I've run easily 15,000 rounds thru it. Everything from superlight 7/8 oz loads of 16 grain Bullseye all the way up to heavy 1 1/8 oz 27 yard loads without ever having a failure that I couldn't directly attribute to not cleaning it after the last 1000 rounds.

A weekend Trap match is anywhere from 400 to 600 rounds and I don't ususally clean it till after the match is over.

This isn't just what I do, either. Most of the Trap shooters I've spoken with do not put any lube on the gas system, either. I'm very surprised to hear people here saying that it's a good idea.

As an added note from a certified Remington armoer, My Remington instructor advised as well to lube the gas system.

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Why do you guys pay a premium for O rings for the 1100. Go to your local hydraulic supply house and have them test the stock O ring on thier hardness tester and buy the next hardest ring. You can buy 100 of them cheaper than ordering 10 or 20 of them Where do you think the ones for sale come from?

Edited by Jaxshooter
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Why do you guys pay a premium for O rings for the 1100. Go to your local hydraulic supply house and have them test the stock O ring on thier hardness tester and buy the next hardest ring. You can buy 100 of them cheaper than ordering 10 or 20 of them Where do you think the ones for sale come from?

Because EricW took the "Time & Energy" to go look them up, test them, package them and stock them for us so we don't have to pay $5.00/each at Brownell's, or run around to hydraulic supply stores with our free time, that's why.

EricW is a reputable dealer here and he does not overcharge for these. His markup is fair and he deserves the price he charges. If YOU want them cheaper, do THAT yourself, but don't slam a nice guy for making a "very small" profit while doing the rest of us a convenience service.

Regards,

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Because EricW took the "Time & Energy" to go look them up, test them, package them and stock them for us so we don't have to pay $5.00/each at Brownell's, or run around to hydraulic supply stores with our free time, that's why.

EricW is a reputable dealer here and he does not overcharge for these. His markup is fair and he deserves the price he charges. If YOU want them cheaper, do THAT yourself, but don't slam a nice guy for making a "very small" profit while doing the rest of us a convenience service.

Regards,

+1 to that, Eric is a great guy and price is definitely fair and you know you are getting the right stuff.

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I have a REM 11-87 to shoot limited or tactical, here's what I did to mine.

DMW Easy loader and over sized bolt handle

3 Gun gear 10 shot side saddle

Choate 8 round extension

Vang Comp oversized safety

21" vent rib barrel

I had a trigger job done

and to keep the gun under control when I'm sweating, I put skate board tape on the fore end

everything works great and its a good shooting, even though it gets a little heavy with 18 shotgun shell's on the gun.

Edited by Tactical Timmy
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This is great info. I came to this site to ask the same question. I did notice however that there was no mention of aftermarket stocks and very little talk about after market sights. My gun is a newer 1100 with the same matte black finish that all the 870 Expresses seem to come with these days and it has the synthetic stocks as well. So , these are a few of the questions I still have.

1) What are the most popular aftermarket stocks and why.

2) Do most of the 3 gunners use pistol grip stocks on there shotguns or not. What if any advantage is there to a pistol grip stock in this game.

3) Someone mentioned tweeking the focing cone and, by this, I believe he meant tapering the forcing cone so as to reduce recoil. Do I have this right?

4) Does anyone sell a mag tube extension that will match the finish on my gun?

5) What are the most popular sight set ups and why. I kinda thought that ghost rings might be real popular, am I wrong? My current barrel is either 26 or 28 inches long and for the time being I slapped on a set of Hi - Viz sights, front and rear, just for quick aquisition. I haven't even shot it so I dont how it works for me yet.

6) Do I need a sling and, if so, do I want one that attaches front and rear or something that atches in one spot like some guys use on their ARs?

Yes, I am a newbie and I haven't even been to a match but, because the shooting season is pretty short here in New England, I wanted to get a jump start by having all my gear redy to go by spring.

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This is great info. I came to this site to ask the same question. I did notice however that there was no mention of aftermarket stocks and very little talk about after market sights. My gun is a newer 1100 with the same matte black finish that all the 870 Expresses seem to come with these days and it has the synthetic stocks as well. So , these are a few of the questions I still have.

1) What are the most popular aftermarket stocks and why.

2) Do most of the 3 gunners use pistol grip stocks on there shotguns or not. What if any advantage is there to a pistol grip stock in this game.

3) Someone mentioned tweeking the focing cone and, by this, I believe he meant tapering the forcing cone so as to reduce recoil. Do I have this right?

4) Does anyone sell a mag tube extension that will match the finish on my gun?

5) What are the most popular sight set ups and why. I kinda thought that ghost rings might be real popular, am I wrong? My current barrel is either 26 or 28 inches long and for the time being I slapped on a set of Hi - Viz sights, front and rear, just for quick aquisition. I haven't even shot it so I dont how it works for me yet.

6) Do I need a sling and, if so, do I want one that attaches front and rear or something that atches in one spot like some guys use on their ARs?

Yes, I am a newbie and I haven't even been to a match but, because the shooting season is pretty short here in New England, I wanted to get a jump start by having all my gear redy to go by spring.

First off, welcome to the forum.

1. My favorite replacement stock is by SPEEDFEED. The Remington stock seems a bit skinny for my taste. I still have the factory grey stock on my 1100CM, but all of my other Remingtons wear stocks from SpeedFeed.

2. Pistol grip stocks are more of a personal preference. Personally i dont like em, but others will tell you they are the best since sliced bread.

3. If you are planning on doing the forcing cone, leave it up to a professional. I havent done mine, but its on my list of things to do.

4. CHOATE makes a parkerized mag tube that will match the finish of your shotgun. (scroll to the bottom of the page) I would recomend the +5 even if it will end up being longer than your bbl.

5. A front sight from HIVIZ or TRUGLO will work for almost all of the shots you need to make. For slug shots you will need some type of rear sight. The fiber optic rears will work but my favorite is 5D ECONOMY RECEIVER SIGHTS.

6. No you do not need a sling.

Hope that helps.

Edited by stingerjg
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2) Do most of the 3 gunners use pistol grip stocks on there shotguns or not. What if any advantage is there to a pistol grip stock in this game.

Pistol grip stocks are rarely seen in USPSA/IMGA matches. However, for the dual home defense role, it might make sense. But the 26" (28?) barrel is not so good for the home, going around corners and all.

6) Do I need a sling and, if so, do I want one that attaches front and rear or something that atches in one spot like some guys use on their ARs?

Depends on the match. No, for USPSA and most others. For some matches, it is helpful because there may be transitions to handgun. Check with your local match. I divide matches 2 ways: sling and non-sling. For sling matches, I use V-TAC (Viking Tactics) which is a 2-point.

Lee

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Sights and stocks are I think up to personal preference. I have seen both kinds on top shooters guns. Try and pick up and shoot one with a regular and pistol grip and also fiber and ghost sights. You need to decide on a loading style as well cause that could play a big factor in stocks. I see alot of weak handers who use pistol grip to help them hold it up there. I think Erik Lund has one on his if I remember, although he shoots a benelli. Anyways things to think about. Sling isn't bad idea to have in case you shoot a "Tactical match" or something like that but most matches dont require one. I like the ghost set up I have but it is not the regular kind you see, I hate the other kind of ghost ones I have shot before but love mine. Most I think are shooting fiber sights.

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post-924-1166632540.jpgCZ223. I second the SpeedFeed stock reccomendation. I got the pistol grip style with shell holders in the butt stock. I ended up cutting off the pistol grip and reshaping the grip area.

Where in NE are you? I'd be glad to let you try out Remzilla some time.

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