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250 Gr Bullets In A 625


rodney brown

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I would appreciate anyones 2 cents worth about my question.

My friend and I both shoot 625's. We are Canadians, so we need to have a PF of 170 to make Major. We have been shooting 4.4 grains of Unique over 230 grains of lead. PF 178 or so.

But now we are going to start shooting 230 grains jacketed/coated Berry's or Rainiers. Less smoke, especially on indoor ranges. Of course we will have to work up a load. But the question came up, why not try 250 grain jacketed bullets. From what I have read, you would have less "felt" recoil. This, in theory, may allow a faster front sight reaquistion on a second shot.

Am I missing something? Perhaps on very long shots you might have to be concerned with bullet drop, but anything else. From what I have read, most of the forumites use 230 grain bullets. They also work for us, but in my opinion, any little thing that might help is worth trying. And I need all the help I can get!!!!

Rod Brown

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Go for it.

There are folks who run 250's and say they shoot quite soft.

I think they are mostly 45 Colt bullets so check the OD but more important see how your guns like them.

As for powder many, including myself, feel that the best use for Uniqe is to pour it out on the ground. Of course some folks use it. If it's all you have OK, but there really are better powders out there especially if you are going to shoot indoors.

What part of Canada?

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Go for it.

There are folks who run 250's and say they shoot quite soft.

I think they are mostly 45 Colt bullets so check the OD but more important see how your guns like them.

As for powder many, including myself, feel that the best use for Uniqe is to pour it out on the ground. Of course some folks use it. If it's all you have OK, but there really are better powders out there especially if you are going to shoot indoors.

What part of Canada?

Viggen

We live in Kingston, Ontario. It is about 2 hours north of Syracuse, N.Y.

About powder, I have bought a pound of Clays and will try and work up some loads with that. Right now I am reloading and trying to get ready to go to Florida. I have a permit to transport my 625 to Florida and plan to shoot there this winter. So that is occupying my time.

Thanks for your .02

Rod

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I shoot 250 gr lead bullets in my 625 when I shoot revolver. They are 250 gr round nose flat point .452 diameter. I load 3.5 grains of Clays for a 168-169 PF. I use to load 3.8 grains and it was right at 175 PF. They are both very soft shooting and accurate loads.

The loads were developed using a 5" Model 625.

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I shoot 250 gr lead bullets in my 625 when I shoot revolver. They are 250 gr round nose flat point .452 diameter. I load 3.5 grains of Clays for a 168-169 PF. I use to load 3.8 grains and it was right at 175 PF. They are both very soft shooting and accurate loads.

The loads were developed using a 5" Model 625.

Jaxshooter

Thank you for the load and PF info.

Rod

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Only problem shooting 250s I can see is if they are anything other than true RN.

RN with a flat point can work OK, truncated cone can work OK, but nothing reloads as slick as true RN.

Mike

Thanks for the info. If you don't mind sharing, what loads do you shoot at matches? Don't know if that is a too personal question. If it is, please disregard.

Rod

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For USPSA revolver I use a 250 grain RNFP lead bullet and Titegroup powder. The Lasercast lead bullet reloading manual lists loads for this to easily make 170+ major. I find it a softer recoilling load than the lighter bullets. :ph34r:

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Only problem shooting 250s I can see is if they are anything other than true RN.

RN with a flat point can work OK, truncated cone can work OK, but nothing reloads as slick as true RN.

Truer words have never been spoken. Strange that truth came from a lawyer's mouth!

Seriously, I used to use Montana's JHPs for USPSA and they had a tendency to hang up if you weren't absolutely perfect on the reload. Since I switched to FMJ heads reloads are lots easier.

I don't think anybody at Nationals this year used anything other than an FMJ style head (except maybe some of the 610 crowd). The ability to easily find FMJ style heads is one of the reasons the 625 dominates USPSA Revolver Division.

Add in the ability to easily make PF, cheap and durable moon clips, easier reloads because you have to fit a big round bullet into a big hole, and lots and lots of good, affordable used guns and you've got a winner.

My personal load is Montana's 230 gr. CMJ seated to 1.270" over 4.3 gr. of Clays. Clean, accurate, and makes 173 PF according to the chrono at Nationals (Two years running! made 173 at the Summer Blast as well).

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Only problem shooting 250s I can see is if they are anything other than true RN.

RN with a flat point can work OK, truncated cone can work OK, but nothing reloads as slick as true RN.

Truer words have never been spoken. Strange that truth came from a lawyer's mouth!

Seriously, I used to use Montana's JHPs for USPSA and they had a tendency to hang up if you weren't absolutely perfect on the reload. Since I switched to FMJ heads reloads are lots easier.

I don't think anybody at Nationals this year used anything other than an FMJ style head (except maybe some of the 610 crowd). The ability to easily find FMJ style heads is one of the reasons the 625 dominates USPSA Revolver Division.

Add in the ability to easily make PF, cheap and durable moon clips, easier reloads because you have to fit a big round bullet into a big hole, and lots and lots of good, affordable used guns and you've got a winner.

My personal load is Montana's 230 gr. CMJ seated to 1.270" over 4.3 gr. of Clays. Clean, accurate, and makes 173 PF according to the chrono at Nationals (Two years running! made 173 at the Summer Blast as well).

Dillon and Rob V

Thank you both for your information and personal load info.

One question for Rob. I have copied Hodgson load info from their manual below. It states that 4.0 grains of Clays is max for a 230 grain FMJ. I am not trying to raise manure, I get a ton more info from this forum than I put in, just want your thoughts.

230 GR. HDY FMJ FP

COL: 1.200"

Longshot 6.8 908 17,200 CUP

HS-6 8.2 825 15,400 CUP

UNIVERSAL 5.6 844 16,800 CUP

HP-38 5.3 832 16,800 CUP

TITEGROUP 4.8 818 16,700 CUP

CLAYS 4.0 732 17,000 CUP

I was going to start out with 3.7 and work up to 4.0, checking my PF as I went. Not that I doubt you. Have you had any pressure problems with 4.3 grains?

Rod Brown

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Mike

Thanks for the info. If you don't mind sharing, what loads do you shoot at matches? Don't know if that is a too personal question. If it is, please disregard.

Rod

Rod, I shoot 4.2 gr. of Clays behind a 230-gr. Rainier plated RN. Most guns will make major with 4.0 or 4.1 of Clays, but I'm loading one load that will give me a little "chrono comfort buffer" from both my 625s plus the 25-2 my son shoots.

Good luck if you decide to try 250s, I think the idea has potential if you can find some nice round 'uns. :)

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Rodney;

One thing I noticed from the data you posted was that they're running a shorter OAL than I run, 1.200" vs. 1.270". That could increase the pressure a bit, but I doubt it.

At any rate I haven't noticed any pressure probelms. The Montana bullets I use have a reputation for being hard and thus need a little extra oomph to make the required factor. I also like a little extra cushion on the chrono stage, so I aim for 170 pf.

The 625 I use probably has a million rounds through it and I suspect the barrel is running a little slow. Might have to make a call to Randy some day...

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Rodney;

One thing I noticed from the data you posted was that they're running a shorter OAL than I run, 1.200" vs. 1.270". That could increase the pressure a bit, but I doubt it.

At any rate I haven't noticed any pressure probelms. The Montana bullets I use have a reputation for being hard and thus need a little extra oomph to make the required factor. I also like a little extra cushion on the chrono stage, so I aim for 170 pf.

The 625 I use probably has a million rounds through it and I suspect the barrel is running a little slow. Might have to make a call to Randy some day...

Mike and Rob

Thanks to both of you for your information. I will tinker with some 250 gr RN bullets and Clays. But considering all the info this forum has provided me, I will likely stick with 230 grs and Clays. They seem to work for most people and all of you have alot more experience than me.

Rod

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