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625 Extractor Rod


cmzneb

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I was dry firing my 625 this morning and the cylinder was getting quite difficult to open.... Found that the extractor rod was loose, and once I tightened it up problem fixed. After dry firing/reloading practice a little more the rod worked loose slightly again.

My question is.... Should I put a little blue loctite on those threads? Or do I just need to crank it down harder?

Thanks!

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I was dry firing my 625 this morning and the cylinder was getting quite difficult to open.... Found that the extractor rod was loose, and once I tightened it up problem fixed. After dry firing/reloading practice a little more the rod worked loose slightly again.

My question is.... Should I put a little blue loctite on those threads? Or do I just need to crank it down harder?

Thanks!

I don't use loctite in that particular spot, but it shouldn't hurt as long as you use the light duty stuff and don't let it get anywhere it shouldn't be.

It is hard to get the proper amount of torque on the rod without a rod tool, but when properly tightened it won't come loose.

Put a moon clip of empties in the cylinder when you tighten it to help spread the torque load over a larger area of the star assembly.

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Blue Loctite - Yes

Moonclip - Yes

Buy the tool for best results - Yes

Alternative <_< is a pair of pliers but use something (leather is best :) ) to protect your rod's finish.

If you use pliers (or vise grips) grip the rod close to the cylinder. This will help with deflection, and if you burr it, you can dress it up with a file or sand paper and the crane will hide the ouchie. :rolleyes:

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I like to put the rod in a vise held by some inner tube or leather. Then tighten it. Firm but not straining. The little wrench they sell do the same thing for ya. I'm a loctite fan, but decided not to in this area. Mainly because of amount of times I'll probably take it apart.

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Blue Loctite.....YES YES YES..

That same thing happened to me at a match..

Blue loctite...... nonono. Get the tool. Use the loctite and you will need the tool to get it appart anyway.

Careful not to bend the rod when tightening.

Did that happen at an ICORE match?

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Blue loctite is the wheelgunner's friend. Use it on all the screws, while you're at it. Go easy on the ejector rod threads, a little dab'll do ya.

A great tool for loosening and tightening ejector rods is a drill chuck. Chuck the rod past the knurling so it doesn't mess up the knurls (knurls?) and it works perfectly. Cheap and easy. Just how I like 'em.

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Blue Loctite.....YES YES YES..

That same thing happened to me at a match..

Blue loctite...... nonono. Get the tool. Use the loctite and you will need the tool to get it appart anyway.

Careful not to bend the rod when tightening.

Did that happen at an ICORE match?

Yes it was an ICORE match in PA. Good thing Bob Purdue had his tool. Sure puts the screws to your mind game though!

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Blue Loctite.....YES YES YES..

That same thing happened to me at a match..

Blue loctite...... nonono. Get the tool. Use the loctite and you will need the tool to get it appart anyway.

Careful not to bend the rod when tightening.

Did that happen at an ICORE match?

Yes it was an ICORE match in PA. Good thing Bob Purdue had his tool. Sure puts the screws to your mind game though!

That Bob Perdue, such a helpful guy!

I'm a loctite fan. Like Mike said, use just a bit. I use a bench vise with brass jaws to hold the rod when I tighten it, with a moon of empties to spread the load on the star.

When I clean my guns I just remove the cylinder, I don't take it apart any further unless it's warranted. That way I don't have to worry about loosening the rod or re-loctiting it.

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Same here. The only time I ever disassemble the cylinder assembly is when I see enough end-shake that I want to stick in one of those Power bearings. Other'n that, brake cleaner (with a little Mobil 1 on the yoke afterward) gets the crap out plenty well enough.

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I was talking with Randy @ Apex last week. He is working on a 610 for me. Anyway, I asked him about the double ball crane lock mod he does. He said the reason for it is to prevent exactly what y'all have been discussing.

I have had the same problem with my Mod 19 and have gone the way of locktite.

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An ejector rod can still come unscrewed and lock up the gun even if a crane-ball lock-up is employed, at least theoretically. The biggest advantage of the crane-ball lock, in my view, is that the action doesn't go to hell if you manage to slightly bend the ejector rod.

I have installed a bunch of the Ron Power crane-ball systems over the years, and have experimented with several different placement options. I still have the kit downstairs in my toolbox. However, I quit doing these as I am not totally convinced that they do all that much to truly lock the action. I think most of the guns with these ball-locks are probably really just locking on the center-pin. I have talked with several gunsmiths over the years who feel they're mostly "for show."

Now I do like the bigger crane-ball locks which the factory PC puts into the 627s. I think that version actually works.

Anyway, blue loctite is the only way to fly.

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