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Help, What Do I Want?


TimWarner

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I shoot an open glock now, home built. For my first year of USPSA it did fine.

Now I want something else.

All I know is that I would like it set up to use either a Jpoint or a C-more, so I can switch a bit and figure out what works best for me. And I would like a 9x19, since I'm used to shooting/loading major 9mm.

The blue v-ported SV from Radical Precision makes me drool, but it's mostly due to looks. I'd like to at least know what I'm looking for when selecting a gunsmith. For the most part, I would trust the smith on comp/porting options, since they know what works for their guns.

So... what did you guys all do that you wish you didn't... or what did you wish you would have done the first time around?

I know a lot of this is personal preference, and it's a HUGE question, considering it could be a $4500+ investment.

Thanks.

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Tim,

I was in the same boat about a year ago. I was shooting an open Glock and decided to see what single action open guns were all about. After doing a bunch of research (most of it was on this site) I decided to go with Bedell blaster. It was a decision that I've not regretted one bit! Dan is an excellent (outstanding, awesome, bitchin') gunsmith. I knew nothing about 1911s in general and he took me through everything with such patience. He's always willing to answer questions (most of mine are stupid questions) and gives solid advice based on years of experience. Dan's the MAN!!

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Tim,

I have been shooting open for a little more than a year and I was in the same boat when I began looking for a gun. As has been said a million times here start calling potential gunsmith's and talk to them. Find one who is willing to educate you about their system and setups. I liked the guys who touted their wares without bashing another guys. That shows me confidence in their work not simply cutting someone else up to get business.

Personally I went with a Bedell shorty in 9mm. A lot of that decision had to do with price and wait time (at the time I got a steal very quickly). But the other large portion of the decision was made based on how willing Dan and Chuck were to answer my questions, teach me the things I didn't know, and allow me to make the decision with the information they gave me rather than trying to sell me one way or the other. For example Dan easily rattled off pros and cons for each and every open setup he builds. In the end the experience was great and Chuck and Dan will get business from me whenever I have the chance to give it.

On the point as to what kind of setup you may want. A shorty may be right up your alley after comeing from a glock. Also Dan definitely knows how to make a nine run like its a little brass making machine.

I love mine.

PM me if you have any more questions. Craig

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I also have a Bedell shorty in 38 super. Unlike everyone else I had some problems with mine when I first got it. But since I worked out the problems it is a great gun and runs like a hose. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another open gun from Dan. There are quite a few smiths that can build a great gun and if you look around you can find some awesome used guns.

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I grabbed up a used shorty built by JL Hardy earlier this year. It was very appealing to me because it came with 9mm and 38SC barrels. I tried the 38SC barrel once to check it out, but it sits in the safe. I like shooting 9mm major, mainly because of the cheap used brass and not having to worry about scrounging for brass at matches. I've been very pleased with this gun. It shoots way better than I do! :lol: I was a little uncertain over buying the shorty, but I don't think recoil is bad and it shoots very flat.

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I'm used to shooting a glock with 115gr bullets for major, so recoil isn't a big deal.

I've gotten a lot of messages from people looking to sell their open guns, but I'm kind of hesitant to go used. I most like to buy new, so I can talk to the smith and get their input as well as talk about what I'm looking for. This being my first, the conversation with the smith is important because I'd like to hear some reasoning for paying what I am, to get what I'm getting, as well as why what I'm getting will benefit me.

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Tim,

+1 on going new if you can afford it.

The advantages are you get a gun built as a system by a smith you can go back to for support should something not work or be to your liking. You know the history of the gun and as you try new things you can track what works and what doesn't. You won't have the chance of buying someone elses car wreck.

Take care, Craig

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I doubt the light and fast vs. heavy and stable debate will be settled any time soon. I started shooting open with a short gun, but the harshness and smack in the hand became more than I wanted. My current open gun was built by Matt McClearn and it is heavy and stable and it shoots oh so soft. Any of the hot rock shooters could take my gun and go finish near or perhaps at the top of the heap at the nationals or world shoot. I like it so much I doubt I would ever go back to a true "shorty".

On the flip side, Dan Bedell is building a gun that is just a tad shorter than the full size blaster and it uses the full size recoil system. Chuck tells me the gun shoots soft, flat, and it isn't harsh. It sounds very appealling.

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The very first priority should be reliability, above all else the gun must run 100% with good ammo and magazines. Find a smith or five with a stellar reputation for reliability, then work with the one that seems to be most comfortable fit with you.

I spent almost a year mining the forums here before I registered, there is an amazing amount of information to be found if you seek it. I selected the smith to build my Limited gun based on that research and couldn't be happier with my decision. My gun is 100% reliable with good ammo and magazines, silly accurate, fast and flat for me.

Now, to the bad part. If I had known then what I know now I would have ordered the gun a little different than what I have. Experience with STI types was something I didn't have, now I do and for example I would have told the smith to take every part of every single ounce of the gun that could be found without sacrificing durability or reliability. I like really light guns, but didn't know at the time I ordered the degree of lightness that I like when discussing STI types. The smith built it just EXACTLY the way we decided it should be built, but not even a year later I see a few changes I would have made.

Why do I tell you this 'bad' part? Buy a good used gun. Wring it out, learn from it, learn with it. Find out what you really want before shelling out the money for your one-of-a-kind super DEE duper blaster that may or may not be what you are looking for. There is good reason so many low mileage high end guns end up for sale, take advantage of it.

If you do go new build it really light with Tungsten parts all over. Then at least you have the option of standard weight and with some simple part changes a light and fast gun. You will be able to tailor the gun more than you would if you went for either end of the spectrum. Oh yeah, one more thing. DON'T chrome the gun until you are sure it is EXACTLY the way you want it after shooting it for at least a half season. If you do and decide to change something it gets a lot more expensive.

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I've gotten a lot of messages from people looking to sell their open guns, but I'm kind of hesitant to go used. I most like to buy new, so I can talk to the smith and get their input as well as talk about what I'm looking for. This being my first, the conversation with the smith is important because I'd like to hear some reasoning for paying what I am, to get what I'm getting, as well as why what I'm getting will benefit me.

I'd recommend buying used, if you can find a gun from someone reputable. When I bought mine, the seller gave me his ebay account so I could see he had good feedback there and he was able to give me a detailed history of the gun. I even called JL, the gun's builder, and he was able to tell me a lot about it (super nice guy!) I had a good feeling about buying it and it's worked out for me. You definitely don't want someone else's nightmare!

Like you, I was leaning toward having one built initially, but it was so much more money! I hadn't shot open at all before, so I didn't even know if I would even like it. I'm still not sure I like open, to tell you the truth! :wacko: Anyway, I wouldn't have known really what to tell a 'smith to build for me without the experience, so it really made sense to me to go the used route. If I change my mind and decide to sell, I won't be out near as much.

The only hard part here is that there aren't nearly as many 9's for sale as there are 38's, so finding the right used gun will take some patience!

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Tim, I have been shooting for quite some time, but I have been shooting limited. I wanted to start shooting open, but everyone's advice was to do my research. Shoot a lot of guns from friends and see what you liked, what you don't like and then take the information you have to a competent gunsmith to build you what you want.

Reliability is a dead given. :wacko: If the gun does not function correctly each and every time you have a match, then you need to get that gun fixed to perform perfectly well each and every time. Thus, a brand new gun built by a gunsmith should perform well from the start. If after so many rounds you start getting malfunctions you should feel confident enough with the gunsmith to be able to give him or her (I don't know of any female gunsmith, but just in case) the gun and have it repaired to the original operating condition.

I followed the advice and after knowing what I wanted I turned to Venry from Radical Precision. In addition to interpreting my interests he also provided me the feedback I needed to build the gun and also the types of loads to put through it. He gave me 2 springs for different loads. He advised me on certain things that I was looking for and the best way to accomplish those interests.

Venry is a person that will work with you. I approached him with a shopping list of parts and we went over these parts with scrutiny to understand what benefits they offered and if they were worthwhile getting. After putting our heads together we agreed on some of the parts, and disagreed on others, but he respected my wishes and interests and put them on the gun anyway. When it came to the barrel and the compensator he worked wonders. Depending on what you want the gun to do and how you want it to feel in your hands he will tune the gun to your wishes and needs.

The gun performs flawlessly. Prior to finishing the gun he gave it to me to try just in case it required something final tuning or adjustment. I shot some 300 – 400 rounds through it. I kept on looking for something to change, but there was nothing. The gun was light like I like them, he fitted the parts so the grip will hold high, the accuracy is superb, I looked, but I didn’t find anything really that I cared to change. He interpreted my wishes and the gun performs beautifully. :wub: I gave the gun back to him and he finished it in no time.

My suggestion is that if you are drooling over what you saw on the website, you need to call him so you can drool over actually firing one of his works of art. By the way in the process of researching my gun I shot the blue gripped one you saw on the website. That gun is awesome, but I like mine better. :lol:

Happy Shooting!!!! :D

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I've found a local guy who has been outstanding about answering my questions and general open-gun babble. I believe he sells SV's, but services in house.

Not to mention the stuff he's got is very sexy.

Here's a pic of what I was recently drooling over. Of course... it would have to be black, but I like the look and I've handled a couple guns very similiar and I like the feel.

jpsv.JPG

I've used a C-more on my glock for 2 years(1 shooting open, 1 year of GSSF), but I really like the Jpoints. I've heard locally of some dislikes with the jpoints, but I have no doubt he'd stand behind his product if I had a problem.

I'd like to try a couple different guns, but it seems like everyone around here shoots 38super.

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I'm kind of figuring money isn't an object for this thread. I'd really like new, and a local smith has been real good about helping me out so far. Just looking for outside opinions on what other people think about various options.

That way, if I ever have a problem, I have one guy to go to who will support the firearm, and knows the exact pistol. And, when I go for my 2nd and 3rd, I can work with the same guy about little things I want to change, or other things to try.

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I'm kind of figuring money isn't an object for this thread. I'd really like new, and a local smith has been real good about helping me out so far. Just looking for outside opinions on what other people think about various options.

That way, if I ever have a problem, I have one guy to go to who will support the firearm, and knows the exact pistol. And, when I go for my 2nd and 3rd, I can work with the same guy about little things I want to change, or other things to try.

Read the above again ... sounds good to me. Seems like a solid base with confidence: a good plan.

That is exactly what I would do for my first open gun if I had somebody "locally" willing to give you the "shirt off his back". Repeat steady access to your 'smith can't be beat when he is a "local", and if he is willing to deliver what you are looking for ... definetely a "hogs heaven". Have fun with it. :D:D:DB)B);)

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