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When Is A 20# Spring A 20# Spring?


AlphaLaundry

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If I buy a 20# recoil spring, at what point is it a 20# spring?

I have been having trouble with my slide comming out of battery during reloads with my XD40 Tactial, so I started checking spring weights, and found things like a 20# spring was at about 8.75#s when holding the slide closed, and 15.0# when the slide is at full recoil. So what part of this makes this a 20# spring?

Just so that we are on the same page, the spring in question (ISMI 20#) had less then 100 rounds on it, and I worked 5 years for a testing lab that did this kind of testing, so I know how to set up and run a test like this, and this was the result of just one of the springs I tested, but they where all like this (lower then what was on the package).

So what dose the spring rating on the package mean?

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The spring wasn't in the gun when I tested it. When I said that it was 8.75# when the slide was closed and 15# at full recoil, I was testing the spring out of the gun, but compressed to the point that it would be in the gun when it was closed and with the slide all the way back.

What I wanted to know, was should a 20# spring have 20#s of force when the slide is closed, or when it is open, and all the way back?

Thanks.

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A 20# spring is rated to be 20# when it is compressed to a certain length. Is your spring an aftermarket spring (Wolff, ISMI, etc.) that is listed by the manufacturer for a 1911 style gun? They interchange with the XD Tactical but the springs are rated to be a certain pound rating when compressed to 1.6" length which relates to a 5" 1911 style gun. You will need to know the compressed spring length for your XD and then measure the spring in pounds/ounces at that particular length. If the compressed length is different than the 1911 style gun then the pound rating of the spring will be different as you might not be compressing the spring to 1.6" thus a lower pound measurement. You might call the folks at Wolff and see if they can tell you the compressed length for an XD Tactical and then measure your spring.

CYa,

Pat

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Pat

Thanks, that is just the info I have been looking for. I have been using ISMI springs for a 1911, and when I get some time I will check to see what the compressed lenght is in a XD.

For now I checked what tension it took to hold the striker back, and then used a recoil spring that was a few pounds heaver, and hope that will work.

Thanks again

Mike

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You might try and round up a spring tester to measure the ISMI springs at the compressed length. I have found that the ISMI springs are heavier (lbs, ozs) than they are rated at (16# measured at close to 18#). Understand, there is absolutely nothing wrong with ISMI springs. You just have to know what a particular spring measures at and then adjust accordingly. One other point to watch for. Make double damn sure that whatever spring you use you don't let it stack up solid when it is at full compression. ISMI sends a notice regarding this as well as instructions with their springs on measuring for this problem. Read them and use them!

CYa,

Pat

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If I buy a 20# recoil spring, at what point is it a 20# spring?

I have been having trouble with my slide comming out of battery during reloads with my XD40 Tactial, so I started checking spring weights, and found things like a 20# spring was at about 8.75#s when holding the slide closed, and 15.0# when the slide is at full recoil. So what part of this makes this a 20# spring?

Just so that we are on the same page, the spring in question (ISMI 20#) had less then 100 rounds on it, and I worked 5 years for a testing lab that did this kind of testing, so I know how to set up and run a test like this, and this was the result of just one of the springs I tested, but they where all like this (lower then what was on the package).

So what dose the spring rating on the package mean?

I always thought it was what ever wieght you are using is the required pressure to collapse a coil spring one inch.

FM

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I don't get too excited about the manufacturer's spring rating. I'm more interested in comparing springs at specific compression lengths. Then when I need a lighter spring or a heavier spring I can select one.

I test springs at two points - The installed length in the gun with the slide in battery and the length with the slide at full recoil. I've measured a few ISMI springs but don't remember the results. The Wolf springs I've measured have been for Glocks and at the recoil compressed length are close to their package marked rating.

Keith

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I always thought it was what ever wieght you are using is the required pressure to collapse a coil spring one inch.

FM

The spring rate is pounds per inch. However, recoil spring are listed as the load at solid height. So an 18# wolff spring exhibits 18 pounds at coil bind.

It you check Lee Spring and the other manufacturers, they're specifications are listed the same way.

Kenny

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