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Fl Sizer Die Adjustment


mustang_52

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Typically, when setting a full length sizing die, you would bring the ram all the way up. Screw the die in until it touches the shellholder/plate, then back the die off just enough to clear the shellplate/holde - if a carbide sizing die. With a steel sizing die it would be normal, once the die is in contact with the shellholder, to lower the ram, then turn the die in another 1/8 turn or si, then bring the ram back up and secure the lock ring on the die.

I've not used a steel die in a progressive press, so I cannot say it this would be the procedure for a shellplate and a steel die, though I would expect something similar. For the steel die it removes the play in the threads. With a carbide die, the carbide is brittle, so you do not want the die contacting, as it may fracture the carbide ring.

Guy

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Typically, when setting a full length sizing die, you would bring the ram all the way up. Screw the die in until it touches the shellholder/plate, then back the die off just enough to clear the shellplate/holde - if a carbide sizing die. With a steel sizing die it would be normal, once the die is in contact with the shellholder, to lower the ram, then turn the die in another 1/8 turn or si, then bring the ram back up and secure the lock ring on the die.

I've not used a steel die in a progressive press, so I cannot say it this would be the procedure for a shellplate and a steel die, though I would expect something similar. For the steel die it removes the play in the threads. With a carbide die, the carbide is brittle, so you do not want the die contacting, as it may fracture the carbide ring.

Guy

2 of the fl dies are steel which i use for rifle and i have 2 others that are carbide for pistol. im using a dillon 550b. Thats pretty much how i did it but i keep reading about taking headspace measurements and adjusting to get that right so im a little confused. I did notice when i ran some 223rem in the sizer die the length of the casing seemed to have gotten just a tad larger while my 260rem seemed to shrink, is this normal?

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Typically, when setting a full length sizing die, you would bring the ram all the way up. Screw the die in until it touches the shellholder/plate, then back the die off just enough to clear the shellplate/holde - if a carbide sizing die. With a steel sizing die it would be normal, once the die is in contact with the shellholder, to lower the ram, then turn the die in another 1/8 turn or si, then bring the ram back up and secure the lock ring on the die.

I've not used a steel die in a progressive press, so I cannot say it this would be the procedure for a shellplate and a steel die, though I would expect something similar. For the steel die it removes the play in the threads. With a carbide die, the carbide is brittle, so you do not want the die contacting, as it may fracture the carbide ring.

Guy

2 of the fl dies are steel which i use for rifle and i have 2 others that are carbide for pistol. im using a dillon 550b. Thats pretty much how i did it but i keep reading about taking headspace measurements and adjusting to get that right so im a little confused. I did notice when i ran some 223rem in the sizer die the length of the casing seemed to have gotten just a tad larger while my 260rem seemed to shrink, is this normal?

IN A PROGRESSIVE, FL steel dies can be adjusted as described previously (touch the shellplate, plus 1/8- to 1/4 turn so the handle "cams over", then tighten the lock ring). Carbide dies should JUST touch the shellplate, then, run an unsized case into the die, check for the barest sliver of light between the die mouth and the shellplate (there's enough spring in most progressives to ensure this), and tighten the lock ring while the case is still in the die to ensure concentricity.

You don't say what you're running your 223's and 260's through, but common wisdom is to full-length-size any round going into a pump, auto, or lever action. Most quality dies will NOT oversize cases (e.g. push the shoulder back too far), and, unless you're looking for benchrest accuracy out of a bolt gun, this generally isn't a concern.

However, adjusting your sizing dies and checking with a headspace gage (e.g. L.E. Wilson, et al) is generally a good idea. 223's stretching is a common phenomena - shrinkage is unusual...

YMMV...

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Typically, when setting a full length sizing die, you would bring the ram all the way up. Screw the die in until it touches the shellholder/plate, then back the die off just enough to clear the shellplate/holde - if a carbide sizing die. With a steel sizing die it would be normal, once the die is in contact with the shellholder, to lower the ram, then turn the die in another 1/8 turn or si, then bring the ram back up and secure the lock ring on the die.

I've not used a steel die in a progressive press, so I cannot say it this would be the procedure for a shellplate and a steel die, though I would expect something similar. For the steel die it removes the play in the threads. With a carbide die, the carbide is brittle, so you do not want the die contacting, as it may fracture the carbide ring.

Guy

2 of the fl dies are steel which i use for rifle and i have 2 others that are carbide for pistol. im using a dillon 550b. Thats pretty much how i did it but i keep reading about taking headspace measurements and adjusting to get that right so im a little confused. I did notice when i ran some 223rem in the sizer die the length of the casing seemed to have gotten just a tad larger while my 260rem seemed to shrink, is this normal?

IN A PROGRESSIVE, FL steel dies can be adjusted as described previously (touch the shellplate, plus 1/8- to 1/4 turn so the handle "cams over", then tighten the lock ring). Carbide dies should JUST touch the shellplate, then, run an unsized case into the die, check for the barest sliver of light between the die mouth and the shellplate (there's enough spring in most progressives to ensure this), and tighten the lock ring while the case is still in the die to ensure concentricity.

You don't say what you're running your 223's and 260's through, but common wisdom is to full-length-size any round going into a pump, auto, or lever action. Most quality dies will NOT oversize cases (e.g. push the shoulder back too far), and, unless you're looking for benchrest accuracy out of a bolt gun, this generally isn't a concern.

However, adjusting your sizing dies and checking with a headspace gage (e.g. L.E. Wilson, et al) is generally a good idea. 223's stretching is a common phenomena - shrinkage is unusual...

YMMV...

ok, this info helps alot. The 223rem and 260rem are both run out of ar15,ar10 rifles. ill follow your instructions and go from there. thanks

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