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Trying To Get My Reload Fast


mjbine

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I am a L/L10 C Class shooter. I have been practicing my reloads and finally taped a couple. I seems to hit my reload but for some reason do not pick up on the sight quickly. I have been drying firing and practicing with hitting most of my reloads about 1.2-1.25 with good hits. I am trying to get faster and wanted someone to give me tips on how to improve.

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Watch Jake's vid's (there posted around here somewhere). For now, look the mag into the gun. You are lowering the gun to the mag in your videos (the oppisite of what you should be doing).

And once you have the technique down it's 10,000 dry fire reps a week for a few months.

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forget speed..you dont speed up errors, you drop them.. e.g. bring back the pistol in one smooth, straight motion instead of the dance that the gun does when coming in for the reload..

once your form is right then it is all about letting go so your body can execute!! iow get out of your own way..

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If you don't do it right, you'll never do it fast. At least not consistently fast.

If you're *trying* to make fast reloads, come game day, you're going to end up with a few decent reloads and a whole bunch of blown reloads with mags floating around low-earth orbit.

Resist the urge to play "wave your hands around and try to beat the timer."

Slow isn't fast. Fast isn't fast. Precise efficiency is fast.

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Don't take this the wrong way. If being fast at reloads amuses you, then by all means focus on it. However, your reloads seem to be fast enough to get out of C class unless live fire results aren't holding up to dry fire results. An extra tenth off a reload isn't what's going to make or break your performance at this point.

That being said, what others have said is right. I'll just add that not only is the gun doing a dance that has more movement than it should, your head and eyes are moving around a bit too much too. the video is too small to tell if you are tracking the magazine or the magwell, but as far as I can tell, the magwell is the right place to be looking.

You should also try checking out your reloads from all your mag pouches, and possibly even from a table.

One other thing to look at in a match or livefire is if you are screwing up your last shot before a reload in order to try and smoke a reload.

Resist the urge to play "wave your hands around and try to beat the timer."

as the kids these days say QFT.

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Resist the urge to play "wave your hands around and try to beat the timer."

as the kids these days say QFT.

LOL, had to look QFT up. I thought it would stand for "Quit F***in' Trying" ;):D

Quoted For Truth works too though :D

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I seems to hit my reload but for some reason do not pick up on the sight quickly.
It's kind of tough to offer advice from the video, but here goes. First off, you might try keeping the gun up in front of your face just a tad higher. Also, the end of the pistol looks like it is bouncing around like a tuning fork during the presentation. Perhaps you are thrusting the gun out with a little too much enthusiasm.

Locating the sights after a reload isn't any different than during the draw. After the reload, snap your eyes to the exact spot on the target you want to hit, see the slide and sights coming up peripherally, let the gun slide into position, then pull your eyes back to the sights. It's really pretty simple. Then again, simple isn't always easy.

FWIW, I have shot a lot of classifiers in the 85%-95% range with 1.25-1.30 second reloads that were really pretty sloppy, lol.

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I am a L/L10 C Class shooter. I have been practicing my reloads and finally taped a couple. I seems to hit my reload but for some reason do not pick up on the sight quickly. I have been drying firing and practicing with hitting most of my reloads about 1.2-1.25 with good hits. I am trying to get faster and wanted someone to give me tips on how to improve.

Well I'm only a B-shooter. I'm nowhere near the skill of the other guys that have commented. The fact that you are actually practicing your reloads is good.

What I don't like about your reload (again remember this is comming from a lowly B shooter... and its been probably said before):

- The angle on your front mag pouch seems a bit too shallow. Maybe take it up a little?

- Are you practicing from the other pouches?

- It looks like you are taking the gun too low and going a tad too flat with it. Try doing the reloads with the gun more vertical and ready for the firing position.

- It sounds like your magazine is "thunking" into the sides or the bottom of the magwell. A perfect reload will barely skin or not touch the bottom and sides of the magwell. Experiment with the angle you are holding the gun and the magazine.

- It seems like you are tense. You aren't flowing. It looks like you are semi-amped. Could be good. Could be bad.

- I'd like to see you snap you eyes to the target more. As soon as your eyes confirm that the mag is 1/4-1/2 (maybe even sooner) in SNAP your eyes to the target. It looks like you are looking at the mag being seated fully before snapping to the target.

That said I don't think your reload is gonna holding you back much. Except for the tension it looks like a B class or low A shooter reloading to me.

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Is there anything other than an A hit? Of course. ;)

Not necessarily an A in the head....but everywhere else.

Seems a little fast for a limited gun (more so for the 10 yard shot than the 7 yard shot), but open that sounds realistic pars to shoot for.

You are hitting head shots at 10 yards with a limited gun in around 1 sec? That is smokin!!!

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The worst perceived notion in are sport is that you need a fast shot split, draw or mag. change to win...

I saw this thread before I shot to day and with Open @ 10yds. Draw 2 reload 2 on same full size paper aiming for A’s I was:

Fastest .93 load /.96 draw

Average 1.23 load /1.11 draw

I did an average out of 5 runs then I took 3 runs to get my fastest. The 1st run to obtain the fastest draw and load was the fastest. The next 2 runs were slower than any of my first 5 runs to average. It’s just not worth pushing at 100% and failing 50+% of the time when you can shoot at 85% and have 90+% success. The point is, learn to do a proper magazine change and push and push and push to do it faster and faster and faster… but at the same time know how much you can push and get the magazine in the gun every time! Consistency while performing as close to the edge is what when’s matches.

DvC,

Chris Tilley

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Hey, Chris - good to see you on here ;)

Fastest .93 load /.96 draw

Average 1.23 load /1.11 draw

Glad to see my times (as an M classified Open shooter) are in line w/ the pace :) At least, in practice, anyway...

It's just not worth pushing at 100% and failing 50+% of the time when you can shoot at 85% and have 90+% success. The point is, learn to do a proper magazine change and push and push and push to do it faster and faster and faster…

...which also makes that 85% speed faster ;)

I guess the answer for Flatland Shooter is that many GMs can consistently draw and reload in the sub-second range, when they're standing there working that skill in practice (I've seen sub .6 reloads out of one, for instance... :wacko: ). In a match, though, the typical pace is slower than max, as Chris is saying. I believe I read somewhere that typical match draws for top GMs hover around a second, and typical loads are 1.00-1.10 for standing reloads?

Some manage faster - in the Steel Challenge, the fast guys are apparently sub .75 for draws on Smoke & Hope, for instance. And there will be an occasional IPSC stage that has some fun like that in it. By and large, though, points rule, and scoring an A on a target is worth a lot more than the 3 tenths you might save with that wicked fast draw that sends the shot sailing wide of the target

The speed difference is more made up in efficiency of movement, lack of hesitation, and confidence in planning and tactics. There's not a huge difference in the shooting speeds between A, M, and GM shooters - its everything else.... (and fewer mistakes, too, usually....)

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More unqualified advice from someone who is in the process of learning how to reload a gun again (this time with a bit more success than the last three times I learned how to reload a gun).

- There is no substitute for slowing down during practice and learning how to reload based on your own ergonomics. Gun in the face. Gun dropped down farther. Gun more vertical. Gun tilted more. You know why the hot rocks are fast? Because they spent the time going through the permutations - giving at least most of them an objective, fair shot. Then they analyzed the weaknesses, made changes and went through the process all over again. Unless you have an identical twin who's a card-carrying Super-G, nobody can rattle off the exact mechanics of how you need to reload. It's a journey that you'll have to explore on your own. There's a lot of qualified people who will make suggestions, but it's ultimately up to you to critically evaluate what generates success for you.

- An average 1.5 second rock-solid reload beats the sh*t out of the occasional 1 second reload with a few 4 second Sputnik's in-between. Down-cold consistency will make you dangerous at many matches. You may not win lots of battles, but it will leave you in good stead to win the war.

- A slight hesitation before you run the mag into the well can work absolute wonders for your reloads. It will give your stronghand a few precious milliseconds to finish rotating the grip toward the magazine. Oddly enough, once your left hand start operating independently, the limiting factor in reloads can become ejecting the mag and rotating the pistol around. The fresh mag is usually already there and waiting - which puts you in the position of learning how to eject the mag out of the gun sooner and thus the learning cycles begins anew.

- Don't underestimate the value of switching guns to learn how to reload. Moving to a SS or a Glock without a magwell can work wonders. There is no margin for error. You'll know you've learned to reload when you go back to the gun with the gigantic magwell and your reloads become almost always all net.

- The biggest challenge I have had to overcome was having the magazine approaching the grip at differing angles. This was caused primarily by my efforts to emulate others and refusing to analyze the mechanics I needed to perform to be successful. Monkey see monkey do will only take you so far. ;)

FWIW...

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Good to see your here Chris!! You said it just about perfect. Todd has almost the exact same philosophy as you. When I took Todd's class, he said basically the same thing, shoot to 90-95% of your ability, not 100% because if your at 100%, you're going to crash a few times and blow the match overall.

Shoot to 90% and do everyting on demand every time, instead of 100% and blow it 50% of the time.

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