Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
Sign in to follow this  
RAZZ

Glock factory barrel with lead

Recommended Posts

I have shot lead through a glock and have had major leading problems. in 9mm and 10mm.. was using very hard cast lead at a 130 Power Factor. but zero problems with aftermarket barrels. www.kapbullets.com sells some good lead. And will ship whatever will fit in a priority mail flat rate box for flat rate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have shot lead through a glock and have had major leading problems. in 9mm and 10mm.. was using very hard cast lead at a 130 Power Factor. but zero problems with aftermarket barrels. www.kapbullets.com sells some good lead. And will ship whatever will fit in a priority mail flat rate box for flat rate.

At the risk of sounding silly, is it visible in the same way that it is with my 1911 barrels, meaning you can literally see it in the first 1/4inch of the barrel?

I'm wondering because I've shot 100 rounds through my factory G21 barrel and it required no more cleaning than if I were shooting Rainiers.

I've shot 500 round of 40 lead reloads through my KKM Glock barrel and it takes two minutes to clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am about to get my first Glock (a 22). Two of my friends just got a 35 and a 22. I loaded up 700 rounds of 155 lead hardcast bullets ( 157 PF) for them to try out and after I checked the barrels and didn't notice any excessive leading that a general cleaning didn't cure. I will run mostly jacketed (no smoke) but will use some lead for practice. I just can't believe I finally bought a Glock I have always thought they were ugly, but on the other hand I have always recommended them to new shooters wanting to get started because they run perfect right out of the box. Thought I would get a production gun so a 22 was the logical choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted this on Glock Talk, but realized I'd get better responses here. You guys don't have the "I said so, and that's the only reason you need" attitude. It is definitely appreciated.

I haven't even tried to count the number of times I've heard, "don't shoot lead in a stock Glock barrel." I've read that this is not recommended b/c lead builds up in a stock barrel faster. I've also read that lead in a stock barrel is fine as long as you don't push it over 1000 fps. Another apparent bonus that you don't need as much powder with lead. I just don't understand what the problem is with lead. Yes, I know it's dirty, but you shoot your gun, then you clean it = not dirty anymore. Does lead buildup affect performance, and if so, how many rounds of does it take for before performance declines? I know an aftermarket barrel is only about $160, but $160=3k bullets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lead builds up faster in the polygonyl rifling of the Glock. That said you can shoot tons of lead through the barrel. As long as that is all you're firing. If you try to follow it up with a FMJ or other jacketed bullets the reduced diameter of the barell from lead buildup can cause overpressure and blow the barell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also new to the forum. I have shot Bear Creek bullets through all of my Glocks (stock barrels) with no problems. In fact I have shot well over five hundred rounds (close to 1000)without cleaning the pistol, with no problems.

That being said my loads are only about 125 power factor (.40). I can only speak for Bear Creek bullets, I shoot them in my revolver all the time. The Bear Creek don't seem to lead the barrels as much as other lead bullets I have used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We run lead, although they are molly coated. So, I suppose that is still considered lead.

Even if we do not clean the rest of the gun we do try to do the barrel every 100-300 rounds.

Having said that, be aware that each barrel will behave differently.

If shooting straight lead take a look at what is happening in the barrel. Some might not like too many lead rounds before a good cleaning. Some might be Ok for several hundred rounds while others might want a bit of scrubbing at 50 or 90 rounds. It comes down to the individual gun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the guns I have seen blown up were Glocks in .40 shooting lead in the first few years of .40 S&W. I think we have better powders and info now.

I think with the new lower power factors required in competition you are more safe but I would put a aftermarket barrel in. Lead requires less powder so that means more pressure right? If you are casually shooting then that's a different story.

I prefer jacketed bullets since they don't have smoke which I find is a killer to overcome in low angle sunlight. Jacketed bullets have gotten pretty cheap also,

I have seen a lot of 1911 .45's double charged and blown up also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lead bullets have a lower coefficient of friction than jacketed bullets = higher velocity with same powder charge. I have shot tens of thousands lead bullets through my Glocks over the years. I don't shoot them in matches because of the smoke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Glock 17. NOWHERE in the manual does it say "Do not shoot lead bullets". They clearly state to only shoot factory ammo, but I think all guns I bought with a manual say that. I cannot say about the manuals for the .40 models.

Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The manual says they won't warrant reloads. In the Armorers class they tell you not to shoot lead, then FMJ. If you shooting one or the other it's okay, just not both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B) Hey Guys,

I've changed my tune on this one. In the first edition of "The Glock in Competition" I waxed philosophic about the various reasons why people blow themselves up with lead bullets that have nothing to do with lead. Those reasons (mostly double-charging with double-charge-prone low-volume powders by inexperienced reloaders, and some quirks about the .40-something Glocks) still apply, however, Mark Passamaneck's scientific research changed my mind.

Mark's an engineer who makes his living dealing with failure analysis in metals. He's also a Glock nut and practical shooter like us.

As you will read in the second edition of "The Glock in Competition" (forgive the shameless plug) Mark set up a number of tests, watching the pressure performance of polygon versus rifled barrels with the same ammo. At the behest of a group of lawyers hoping to sue Glock over the issue, he intentionally blew up a Glock 22 just to study how/why it happened.

Like some of the other posters, I burn a lot of Bear Creek moly-coats, and have burned thousands and thousands of rounds of cast lead. That said, I've been surprised by cast bullets, where after a period of problem-free shooting, I looked at my brass and found black primers, and enough lead in the barrel to leave metal filings on my bench after using a Lewis lead remover.

As Mark points out, the leading performance of the Glock barrel is NOT linear. Frankly, his discussion of the topic is the best I've ever seen. That's why it's in my book.

You can shoot lead bullets, but I don't recommend it. Mark's article explains why (pictures, pressure data, and all.)

Robin Taylor

www.taylorfreelance.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B,

Less powder does not equal more pressure.

Umm 200 gr lead and 200 jr jacket

Lead requires less powder to get the same velocity.

If its not generating more pressure than what is happening??

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC, part of the answer is that lead obturates the barrel better because it is softer than jacketed. It seals the bore better against the gases being generated by the burning of the powder. Less leakage - more gas pressure to propel the bullet.

I've also heard that the polygonal rifling of Glock barrels also allows a better seal than the traditional lands and grooves rifling, so that for a given bullet, lead or otherwise, Glock barrels will run, on average, a bit faster.

FWIW,

Kevin C.

Edited to say, Welcome to the forums!

Kevin C.

Edited by kevin c

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that the Glocks that kaboom for one reason or another seem to be mostly 40s. I remember when they first started doing that and the fault was almost always traced (or so they claimed) to certain powders. Or the weakened brass base from reloading brass fired in Glocks.

I use a 17 and interchange hard cast and jacketed and, since it isn't a self defense gun, I clean it when I feel guilty about it.

Have there been any documented cases of 9s kabooming after shooting lead that was not attibutable to double-charging or some other factor?

I ask because in a current magazine, the author is touting a Barsto barrel because, among other things, lead can be used in the Glock. I like my 17, plan to keep on using lead, but if there REALLY is a reason to be concerned, I probably will buy another barrel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B,

Less powder does not equal more pressure.

Umm 200 gr lead and 200 jr jacket

Lead requires less powder to get the same velocity.

If its not generating more pressure than what is happening??

.

Nope, lead requires less powder because its generating less friction. Less friction means more velocity with the same powder charge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think half the people here are mis-using or mis-understanding the word "lead".

Lead bullets are just that - lead - with a groove or two to hold solid lubricant (looks & feels like wax at room temp.) These tend NOT to be PURE lead but are rather "hardcast". THESE bullets cause problems over time and pure/soft lead is supposed to make it worse - if you shoot enough of it.

In contrast MOLY JACKETED or POLYMER JACKETED like Nationals present no problem whatsoever. THEY ARE NOT THE "LEAD" BULLETS WE ARE TALKING ABOUT.

ANd copper plated/jacketed? I have well over 12,000 rounds through my GLock 17 barrel with NO cleaning of the bore whatsoever. We won 4 of 5 GSSF team events in 2005 with the barrel in that condition.

D.C. Johnson

Team Shooters Paradise GSSF I

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lead in a Glock?

10mm 200gr. WFNGC Beartooth made by Double Tap Ammo in a stock G29

"This is the load that you have been hearing about! This hardcast Wide Flat Nose gas - checked bullet will not deform on impact, and will create a large deep wound channel. Excellent for hunting or woods protection!"

"Bill,

Yes, the gas check and the hardness of the bullet make this a great

choice for your G29. You will have no problems.

Mike McNett

President

DoubleTap Ammunition"

I know you're not supposed to shoot lead out of a stock Glock, but Double Tap Ammo says these will be fine out of my stock G29. Opinions anyone? I hunt with handgun, and I'm a fan of using hardcast over JHP for hunting.

Thanks, jager

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Billy, I personally feel if you just keep the gun clean every couple hundred of rounds you will never have an issue.

See you in Sept at the LIC..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are going to get varying reports.

The thing with lead is that the bullets need to have a certain amount of hardness (or softness) for the velocity that they are being shot. If it's off either way...the barrel can lead up quickly.

Then, guns like the Glock, have polygon rifling that can further enhance the dreaded leading issue.

You might just try some and see.

Are you going to use this ammo for everyday plinking, or just for hunting/carry ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are going to get varying reports.

The thing with lead is that the bullets need to have a certain amount of hardness (or softness) for the velocity that they are being shot. If it's off either way...the barrel can lead up quickly.

Then, guns like the Glock, have polygon rifling that can further enhance the dreaded leading issue.

You might just try some and see.

Are you going to use this ammo for everyday plinking, or just for hunting/carry ?

Not a plinker round. Strictly hunting or bear protection, and maybe 50 or so to sight in and get familiar with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might be worth it to try some out then.

Check as you go (pull the barrel out of the gun and look). If you do get leading, come on back and let us know. After pulling my hair out...I found what works to get the lead out of Glock barrels.

BTW...you'd probably get a better answer to this particular question on the 10mm section (10 ring?) over on GlockTalk. Somebody there will have tried this out already. (DT ammo in the Glock)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...