Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Recommended Posts

I have always said if it stops being fun, ill slack off. It's not hard to see where travel and time away can wear a person down. Especially of they're not shooting up to their own expectations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have worked with several of the same firearms instructors for over 15 years. While I still love to shoot and have a healthy respect for firearms… This is not the case with some of my coworkers.

Here is the analogy. Amusement parks are fun, right? It would be terrific to work there, right? Well, at my last trip to Kings Dominion, I could see the look of death and boredom on many of the faces of the people who work there. Unfortunately many of my coworkers have the same look on their faces. I know it's hard to believe… But yes it can even happen at a gun range!

When I began working as a firearms instructor, I vowed to never let the work interfere with my love for firearms and the sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was interesting about the OP's goal theory.I read Bassham's book about how he was flat after winning the gold.I had the best year of my life shooting this year.I blew all my goals out of the water.The day after the last shoot when I woke up I just felt dead inside.This depression of sorts lasted about a month...My coach and I started putting new goals together for next year and the fire is coming back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes you just got to take a mental break from everything. I have found its very easy to beat your self up in this sport from simple mistakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working consistently at something without totally saturating oneself in it or obsessing about it will help prevent burnout while enjoying most of the benefits of pursuing it.

But if you seek to be at the very top level of something, you are going to have to saturate yourself and obsess about it, for a long time, before you're one of the best. What do you do in that case?

I remember a story about one of the world's finest trumpet players who held the principal trumpet chair in a top symphony orchestra, and also kept a full schedule of teaching aspiring trumpeters. He said that every summer, he took one full month to go fishing and completely get away from civilization, music and his trumpet. The last few days of his time off, he started to really miss his trumpet, his musician friends, and the magnificent music they made. His rest was complete and he went back at it full force for the next 11 months. I believe he did this every single year over a multi-decade career.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say I got burned out in a different way.  I had a divorce so all my money and guns went to get back on my feet.  In that time I also had a bad motorcycle accident that put me back in motivation.  

 

Do or did I want to stop no.  Had the chance to get back into the game 4 years later. I have to say the excitement I had before was lacking and I do believe it's due to my accident 3 years ago.  I am a believer that if I practice as I did before  I'm sure I can get that excitement back.  I feel I gave up. Trying to turn that around but it seems like I need motivation. I guess you can say it's hard to motivate myself at times. We will see where this goes as LIFE doesn't stop for no one.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never felt even the least bit burned out with shooting of any kind. I honestly think I would play with guns all day everyday if my budget/schedule allowed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me having success kills burn out. Coming in 3rd place 4 times in a row can start burn out for sure. Sometimes starting a new hobby or interest can  your outlook on life in general. Just my 2cents........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2006 at 1:15 AM, spook said:

My burnout came when I started doing things other people wanted me to do. It also had something to do with being afraid to let go of things that have given you success in the past (say you're a good Lim shooter and you're afraid to switch to Open because you will have to "start from scratch"). The funny thing is that there is no thing more detrimental to shooting performance than burn out...

If you do EXACTLY what you want, there's no burn out. This includes taking breaks, switching divisions, shooting different shooting games etc.

My 2 cents.

 

Good advice, on some days when I plan to go live fire practice and as I’m getting stuff ready to leave   my drive kind of dies and I’m just not feeling it.  I’ve worked through it and forced it some times and the practice just wasn’t effective cause my head wasn’t in the game 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to switch games when I burn out. I cycle between USPSA, 3 Gun and PRS. Currently on on the long range kick and haven't shot USPSA in over a year.

 

I know that's not the way to get good at any one sport but I'm in it for fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Run two clubs and build stages for a third.  For 3 years, that will do it. I would be interested to see how many of these posters are club administrators. I got tired of the complainers who show up at 9:00, do nothing and then complain all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×