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New Colt 10 shot .22


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This new 10 shot might be an alternative for a 617 for speed sports. The cylinder appears to be the same size as the 617's so I hope my loaders will fit. Hopefully the trigger is smooth and fast and not a super long DA pull like my GP100 .22. I might have to order one.

new colt.jpg

617_loaders_800w.jpg

Edited by DS-10-SPEED
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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I have had the opportunity to fondle and measure a new Cobra, gun was tight with very good lockup and a better trigger than any of the newer S&W guns. if this carries over to the King Cobra 22 it will be a winner; too bad we cant find one for sale nor listed on Colt's site.

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On 7/5/2022 at 1:58 PM, DS-10-SPEED said:

I just ordered a 4.25" 10 shot King Cobra, $965.95, I was surprised to hear they listed 3 barrel lengths, 2.5", 4.25" and 6".

 

I'll post pics when it comes in.

Where did you order from?  I've been looking all over!

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1 hour ago, rooster mcbee said:

Where did you order from?  I've been looking all over!

I ordered it from Williams Gun Sight Inc., besides their sight manufacturing business they also have a fairly large retail store and it's 20 miles from me. They didn't have any .22 10 shot Colts in stock but the salesman said he could order one, they don't know when it will come in, hopefully soon but it could take awhile.

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I just saw this picture of the new Colt 10 shot cylinder, there is no recess for the cartridge rims. That seems really dangerous for rimfire! All my other .22's have a recessed area to protect the rims from being discharged. I'm sure the odds are slim that someone would accidentally hit the cylinder with something hard when it is loaded up and the cylinder is open, but that's how bad stuff happens. What are your thoughts?

 

 

Colt-King-Cobra-22LR-4-800.jpg

617_cylinder.jpg

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I'm not too worried, though the worse can happen at anytime.

Looking at the 617 if you dropped it on a sharp pointy rock "star down" even they could go off maybe !

 

And speaking of stars, the Colt looks kinda pathetic, though that could be just a picture gun.

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57 minutes ago, 10mmdave said:

I'm not too worried, though the worse can happen at anytime.

Looking at the 617 if you dropped it on a sharp pointy rock "star down" even they could go off maybe !

 

And speaking of stars, the Colt looks kinda pathetic, though that could be just a picture gun.

That's true, pretty rare for that to ever happen. But over the last 30 years of shooting speed sports, I have seen a few rim blow out failures and the cylinder recess would be nice to have when that happens.

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The recessed headspace has been pretty standard on rimfires since back when everything was a rimfire. If a .22 has a rim blowout, at least it will be in front of the recoil shield and sandwiched between 2 other cases. It seems unlikely that the shooter would be in danger of any harm.

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I've had a few blown cases in my 617 so I like the added safety of the recessed chamber.  These happened with Aguilla SE ammo.  I had two with the 617 and two more with my Walther Colt Gold Cup Trophy so I sold all the remaining Aguilla I had after segregating the bad brick.

Blown cases (3).jfif

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With the rims exposed and that close together wouldn't a case head blow out possibly detonate the round next to it?  if it blew right next to a live rimfire round wouldn't that set off the round? I might be stating the obvious (it wasn't to me until now) but that seems to be a great reason for recessed chambers.  Theoretically they could set off multiple rounds since they are all exposed and so close together. might not be an issue in a 6 shot but the 10 shot versions the rims of all the rounds are practically touching.

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On 7/7/2022 at 10:04 PM, DS-10-SPEED said:

I just saw this picture of the new Colt 10 shot cylinder, there is no recess for the cartridge rims. That seems really dangerous for rimfire! All my other .22's have a recessed area to protect the rims from being discharged. I'm sure the odds are slim that someone would accidentally hit the cylinder with something hard when it is loaded up and the cylinder is open, but that's how bad stuff happens. What are your thoughts?

 

 

Colt-King-Cobra-22LR-4-800.jpg

617_cylinder.jpg


Odd / cheap looking for sure.  Can think of no good reason, maybe ejector strength? Cost cutting?

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On 7/9/2022 at 7:41 PM, Toolguy said:

The recessed headspace has been pretty standard on rimfires since back when everything was a rimfire. If a .22 has a rim blowout, at least it will be in front of the recoil shield and sandwiched between 2 other cases. It seems unlikely that the shooter would be in danger of any harm.

What he said ^^^

 

I was shooting my 617 over the weekend, had a few hang ups closing the cylinder as all the rounds did not seat and I bashed the rims of some rounds pretty good a few times (two days of steel challenge shooting, dirty dirty gun) and no discharges or issues.

When it does happen, because since we are talking about it it will more than likely happen to ME, I will report back 🤕

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  • 4 weeks later...

Called Colt today to inquire about the king cobra 22, was told that they do not have a scheduled production date for the gun. Guess the Colt rep that stated in one of the videos that they were ready for shipment is a typical over promise underdeliver type. 

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S&W started recessing .22 rims in 1935, the Heavy Frame Target having been on the market since 1915.  

Colt, H&R, and IJ followed suit. 

Some H&Rs have a rim around the circumference of the cylinder instead of individual counterbores.

Iver Johnson later added the Flash Control cylinder with a flange around the front of the cylinder to contain flash from the gap.

 

The purpose is not so much as to protect against knocks but to divert the flash if a case rim ruptures.

 

Ammo is better now, but it seems strange that Colt should give up a design that has been common for 87 years.

Edited by Jim Watson
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