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Hello, I have been doing some research on Atlas Gunworks for a potential 2011. The various videos mentioned that certain models perform better within a particular range of grip pressure. How does one evaluate grip strength when holding a pistol? Additionally, do any of you do anything to improve your grip strength or do you just shoot and gain strength as you go?

 

Thanks for your help.

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I use the captains of crush grippers and rubber bands. I kept them on my desk and use them occasionally throughout the day.

 

The test strength they my grip strength devices that measure how many pounds you can pull. None of these are very expensive given what an Atlas Costs.

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20 hours ago, NotAnAddict said:

The various videos mentioned that certain models perform better within a particular range of grip pressure.

 

Sounds like nonsense. 

 

Grip the s#!t out of it with your support hand.  Grip it just hard enough with your strong hand so you can freely work the trigger.  Get stronger hands.

 

It's simple don't over think it.

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I think it has more to do with grip technique than strength. I don't see myself as an overly strong dude, but the gun doesn't move much in my hands. 
I've seen big meat heads at the range struggling to control a 9mm. 
One of the most important things is getting as much meat of your left hand onto the gun as possible.

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3 hours ago, StefVanHauwe said:

 

21 hours ago, Intheshaw1 said:

I use the captains of crush grippers and rubber bands. I kept them on my desk and use them occasionally throughout the day.

 

The test strength they my grip strength devices that measure how many pounds you can pull. None of these are very expensive given what an Atlas Costs.

 

Thank you for those videos. This gave me and understanding of why Intheshaw1 mentioned rubber bands in his comments. I have never worked out those support muscles so I imagine my grip strength may be weak. Glad I did not go nuts on the crush grippers before watching the videos and get tendonitis.  

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I think weight, PF, and other things play a factor. Can't grip every pistol the same. Just like hammering in different size nails into different material. After the first shot you can micro adjust. Firm but not struggling to clinch

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3 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

 

Sounds like nonsense. 

 

Grip the s#!t out of it with your support hand.  Grip it just hard enough with your strong hand so you can freely work the trigger.  Get stronger hands.

 

It's simple don't over think it.

 

I imagine I need stronger hands and better grip techniques to control recoil more effectively. Thank you for your input.

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1 minute ago, MuayThaiJJ said:

I think weight, PF, and other things play a factor. Can't grip every pistol the same. Just like hammering in different size nails into different material. After the first shot you can micro adjust. Firm but not struggling to clinch

MuayThaiJJ, I appreciate the analogy with hammering and nails. So do you apply the different grip pressure with each gun or is it more a function of different grip techniques? Thank you.

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29 minutes ago, NotAnAddict said:

 

 

Thank you for those videos. This gave me and understanding of why Intheshaw1 mentioned rubber bands in his comments. I have never worked out those support muscles so I imagine my grip strength may be weak. Glad I did not go nuts on the crush grippers before watching the videos and get tendonitis.  

Those are the videos that got me started as well. I usually warm up with a T gripper and work in some 1s and always the rubber bands after.  You can use any rubber band that gives enough resistance, I just use the CoC ones because Amazon had them with my T gripper for like a buck more.

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30 minutes ago, NotAnAddict said:

MuayThaiJJ, I appreciate the analogy with hammering and nails. So do you apply the different grip pressure with each gun or is it more a function of different grip techniques? Thank you.

Different guns and platforms. For example, my 2011 and Tanfo are a lot heavier than my small frame CZ75, so I feel like I grip those softer than the CZ. Firm but relaxed if that makes sense. I find the recoil is not dispersed just to my hand/wrist but my whole body. I find myself gripping the CZ a bit tighter because it has more snap.

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2 hours ago, MuayThaiJJ said:

Different guns and platforms. For example, my 2011 and Tanfo are a lot heavier than my small frame CZ75, so I feel like I grip those softer than the CZ. Firm but relaxed if that makes sense. I find the recoil is not dispersed just to my hand/wrist but my whole body. I find myself gripping the CZ a bit tighter because it has more snap.

Thanks. That is some practical experience that gives me some clarity along with your analogy. 

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2 hours ago, Intheshaw1 said:

Those are the videos that got me started as well. I usually warm up with a T gripper and work in some 1s and always the rubber bands after.  You can use any rubber band that gives enough resistance, I just use the CoC ones because Amazon had them with my T gripper for like a buck more.

 

Have you noticed a large difference over time on your ability to control recoil and muzzle flip with the improvement in strength?

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14 minutes ago, NotAnAddict said:

 

Have you noticed a large difference over time on your ability to control recoil and muzzle flip with the improvement in strength?

What has worked best for me is the stamina over the course of the match. Before I would have some fatigue halfway through the match and unknowingly start relaxing my grip and now I can just keep it locked it. 

 

It's not so much overpowering recoil as just gripping the gun so it doesn't move on your hand and having consistent recoil.

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I will say as a 2011 manufacturer and user myself, grip strength can and will play into functionality of a custom race gun.  It doesnt just apply to 1911 and 2011s either.  Personal experience has taught me this over the last few months especially.  I never have gun issues with my guns unless its ammo related pretty much, but since I started shooting again a few weeks ago after a major support arm injury, I have been having periodic malfunctions with failure to feed due to limp wrist.   I have a hard time gripping the gun still with support hand and after decades of shooting proper grip I sometimes forget I am monkey gripping with strong hand right now to make up for that.  These guns are race cars and finely tuned with ammo, springs etc.  If you fail to do your part and grip the gun proper each time, then you are changing the characteristics of what it was tuned for.   

Edited by jbauman915
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On 9/24/2021 at 5:00 PM, NotAnAddict said:

Additionally, do any of you do anything to improve your grip strength or do you just shoot and gain strength as you go?

I do have a hand squeezer but deadlifts in the gym and shooting a lot of weak hand seem to work better for me. In both instances, you are getting secondary benefits  - posterior body strength and better weak hand shooting respectively - you don't get with the hand squeezing devices.

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On 9/24/2021 at 5:00 PM, NotAnAddict said:

The various videos mentioned that certain models perform better within a particular range of grip pressure. How does one evaluate grip strength when holding a pistol?

Dry fire a lot with the gun of your choice. Ben Stoeger has some good advice on what to watch for so you know when it is right. Does the gun/grip point well for you? Sight picture good? Sight picture maintained when you pull the trigger fast? It's trial and error so adjust as needed. Test it all with live fire when the gun is bouncing.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 9/24/2021 at 3:00 PM, NotAnAddict said:

Hello, I have been doing some research on Atlas Gunworks for a potential 2011. The various videos mentioned that certain models perform better within a particular range of grip pressure. How does one evaluate grip strength when holding a pistol? Additionally, do any of you do anything to improve your grip strength or do you just shoot and gain strength as you go?

 

Thanks for your help.

NAA: 

 

Never found the hand grip things to work as quickly as weights.  Some simple ones that don't need weight lifting stuff are hanging from a bar and weighted carries using things you have at hole like two each, five gallon buckets.  A good one would be to load two sand bags about 3/4 full and grab them in the middle so you have sand on each side of your hand and walk for twenty or thirty yards.  The loose sand bags will force you to really grip them which is probably better than static holds like on a solid bar.  Lifting the same from the ground overhead will also do a decent job.   If you have gear, consider buying an axle bar.  I think my best gains with wrist and grip strength come from an axle bar.  Just use it in place of an Olympic bar and you will be fine. 

 

Forgot one that I just got done using.  Suples Bulgarian Bag.  Fantastic for grip strength, not boring, and pretty good for overall fitness.  A lot of transference into any action sort of activity.  With any dynamic training types of gear, get something lighter than you think you can handle.  

 

Gargoil66

 

 

Edited by gargoil66
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On 9/26/2021 at 2:53 PM, jbauman915 said:

I never have gun issues with my guns unless its ammo related pretty much, but since I started shooting again a few weeks ago after a major support arm injury, I have been having periodic malfunctions with failure to feed due to limp wrist.   I have a hard time gripping the gun still with support hand and after decades of shooting proper grip I sometimes forget I am monkey gripping with strong hand right now to make up for that.  These guns are race cars and finely tuned with ammo, springs etc.  If you fail to do your part and grip the gun proper each time, then you are changing the characteristics of what it was tuned for.   

 

I have never been able to duplicate the issues some guns seem to have if they are not held tight, got curious one day and set up a test where the gun was fired (Sig 9mm in this case) without any grip pressure whatsoever and still couldn't force a ftf. At matches I also do not see folks getting ftf's on the weak hand or strong hand only classifiers.

 

Not picking on anybody or any gun, I just can't duplicate this often mentioned issue with my guns and if I could I think I would have to modify the gun so it would be reliable when fired weak hand only - maybe less slide spring weight? 

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I think the average guy has more than enough strength to control a handgun with out any extra work. If anything just dryfiring regularly will build any additional strength you might need, while also helping to improve your technique which is what I think matters.

 

Don't believe me, go find a video of a lady, or junior, or even better a lady junior who's controlling the gun really well. The average adult male is going to be stronger than them, so if they out shoot you it's not because you need to work on your grip strength. 

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35 minutes ago, Racinready300ex said:

I think the average guy has more than enough strength to control a handgun with out any extra work. If anything just dryfiring regularly will build any additional strength you might need, while also helping to improve your technique which is what I think matters.

 

Don't believe me, go find a video of a lady, or junior, or even better a lady junior who's controlling the gun really well. The average adult male is going to be stronger than them, so if they out shoot you it's not because you need to work on your grip strength. 

RR300:

 

Nope -- grip strength alone may not be key to shooting performance but it sure does help.  We  both know why too.  The more vice like our grip is, the faster we can pull the trigger without moving the firearm in the process.  Since I shoot revolver, grip strength is very critical in performance.  

 

My bet is that any competitive shooter, male or female, who notes what they think is a weakness will train to overcome that weakness.  If they think it is a mental issue, they will test out some of the mental skills techniques common today.  Most likely though, if they think it is physical strength, they will go after physical training of some sort.

 

Part of the mental skills game is eliminating stressors.  Someone may have enough of any physical ability to do something really well but if they think they are lacking, they will bring that with them into competition and these sorts of thoughts are not good for performance unless they can block them -- which is difficult.  Easier to go into the event confident that they are physically ready.  

 

So maybe they don't need to do any sort of grip strength training and maybe they do.  One thing for sure, I give the edge to the guy who enters an event confident of his physical ability to perform in that event so if someone thinks they need to work on grip strength -- they need to go for it.  Unless they do something real stupid like way too many reps or way too much weight and end up tearing tendons, I do not see how it will hurt and in fact think it will surely help.

 

GG66

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, gargoil66 said:

RR300:

 

Nope -- grip strength alone may not be key to shooting performance but it sure does help.  We  both know why too.  The more vice like our grip is, the faster we can pull the trigger without moving the firearm in the process.  Since I shoot revolver, grip strength is very critical in performance.  

 

My bet is that any competitive shooter, male or female, who notes what they think is a weakness will train to overcome that weakness.  If they think it is a mental issue, they will test out some of the mental skills techniques common today.  Most likely though, if they think it is physical strength, they will go after physical training of some sort.

 

Part of the mental skills game is eliminating stressors.  Someone may have enough of any physical ability to do something really well but if they think they are lacking, they will bring that with them into competition and these sorts of thoughts are not good for performance unless they can block them -- which is difficult.  Easier to go into the event confident that they are physically ready.  

 

So maybe they don't need to do any sort of grip strength training and maybe they do.  One thing for sure, I give the edge to the guy who enters an event confident of his physical ability to perform in that event so if someone thinks they need to work on grip strength -- they need to go for it.  Unless they do something real stupid like way too many reps or way too much weight and end up tearing tendons, I do not see how it will hurt and in fact think it will surely help.

 

GG66

 

 

 

 

Certainly the mental game is important, much more important than your strength or speed. But if working it helps you feel better about your chances that's great go after it. But know and believing you already have the grip strength you need can have the same effect. Freeing you up to work on things that matter. 

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6 hours ago, gargoil66 said:

RR300:

 

Nope -- grip strength alone may not be key to shooting performance but it sure does help.  We  both know why too.  The more vice like our grip is, the faster we can pull the trigger without moving the firearm in the process.  Since I shoot revolver, grip strength is very critical in performance.  

 

My bet is that any competitive shooter, male or female, who notes what they think is a weakness will train to overcome that weakness.  If they think it is a mental issue, they will test out some of the mental skills techniques common today.  Most likely though, if they think it is physical strength, they will go after physical training of some sort.

 

Part of the mental skills game is eliminating stressors.  Someone may have enough of any physical ability to do something really well but if they think they are lacking, they will bring that with them into competition and these sorts of thoughts are not good for performance unless they can block them -- which is difficult.  Easier to go into the event confident that they are physically ready.  

 

So maybe they don't need to do any sort of grip strength training and maybe they do.  One thing for sure, I give the edge to the guy who enters an event confident of his physical ability to perform in that event so if someone thinks they need to work on grip strength -- they need to go for it.  Unless they do something real stupid like way too many reps or way too much weight and end up tearing tendons, I do not see how it will hurt and in fact think it will surely help.

 

GG66

 

 

 

Great post

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On 10/13/2021 at 10:05 AM, gargoil66 said:

We  both know why too.  The more vice like our grip is, the faster we can pull the trigger without moving the firearm in the process.  Since I shoot revolver, grip strength is very critical in performance.  

 

Not arguing, but I have seen a lot of guidance suggesting that you work on trigger control by trying to get the mechanics right while pulling the trigger rather than outmuscling the gun. 

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